Pre-study Course

The pre-study course at Poznan University of Medical Sciences begins usually on the first Monday of September and lasts for four weeks. The course is mandatory for all the students accepted to the 1st year of the 6-year MD Program, the 5-year DDS Program, Physiotherapy Program and the 6-year Pharm. D. Program taught in English at our University.

The main aim of the course is to revise students’ knowledge in Biology, Chemistry and Physics, and to introduce new subject areas in these particular courses, which contribute to the medical studies that the newcomers undertake. In addition, the students have language classes in Polish, starting from the beginner level. Students who already speak Polish form a separate group which is taught at a more advanced level.

Both parts of the Pre-study course – Part 1offered online and Part 2 with students present at PUMS – is mandatory for all students accepted to the first year of the 6-year MD Program, the 5-year DDS Program, the 3-year B. Sc.

Physiotherapy Program and the 6-year Pharm. D. Program taught in English at the University.

Part 1 will be held on July 31 to August 18, 2017. Online access will be e-mailed to all admitted students prior to July 31.

Please note that for this part of the course students are advised to have access to the Internet once a day every day throughout the entire duration of Part 1.

The second part of the pre-study course will be held at PUMS starting on August 28 and ending on September 22, 2017.

2017 SCHEDULE of the second part of the pre-study course click here to open PDF file

2017 Biology schedule click here to open PDF file

The cost of the 2017 course is 4 200 PLN. The fee must be paid before the end of June 2017.

The list of books for pre-study course is presented below:

Biology:
Reece:Campbell Biology with MasteringBiology GE_o10, 10/e Reece, Urry, Cain, Wasserman, Minorsky, Jackson & Campbell – ISBN-13:9781292008745.

Chemistry:
Pearson New International Edition: An Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry, 11/e Timberlake – ISBN-13:9781292022154.

Physics:
Pearson New International Edition: Principles with Applications, 6/e Giancoli – ISBN-13: 9781292021768.

3rd European Laryngological Live Surgery Broadcast

Save the date for our annual live surgery on-line event in the field of laryngology. The 3rd European Laryngology Live Surgery Broadcast is organized by PUMS Department of Otolaryngology (best clinic of its kind in Poland) in cooperation with the European Laryngological Society and Poznan Supercomputing and Networking Center, and brings together world-class specialists in the field to discuss cases, perform and comment live surgeries.

Tune in for free on December 13 from 9am CET at http://els.livesurgery.net/.

Teenage patient implanted with a micro-pacemaker

After introducing the smallest pacemaker in the world to treat adult patients, doctors from PUMS Lord’s Transfiguration Hospital have now sucecssfully used this type of device to save a teenage girl. Having been born with a congenital heart disease, the patient has lived with various types of traditional pacemakers, but after her heart was attacked by infections, the best solution was to use a much smaller device.

The procedure was performed in Poland on a teenage patient only for the second time. Because the size of the new device, the operation was minimally-invasive and the patient can be released home after just one week to lead a normal life.

News report in Polish: http://poznan.tvp.pl/35011348/stymulator-w-sercu-nastolatki.

Honorary Degree for Prof. Oliver Kayser

We are happy to announce that Poznan University of Medical Sciences has awarded Prof. Oliver Kayser from Faculty of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering at Technische Universität, Dortmund (Germany) with an Honorary Doctorate Degree.

The distinction has been conferred in recognition of prof. Kayser’s achievements in isolation and identification of new pharmacologically active compounds, and for explaining the genetic and molecular mechanisms involved in their synthesis.

Diabetic Foot Conference

Learn all about the surgical techniques used in endovascular operations during the VII International Conference on Diabetic Foot on December 1, 2017 at PUMS. In addition to renowned Polish surgeons, we will be hosting Dr Marco Manzi and dr Mariano Palena from Italy. The guests will present CLIC session (Critical Limb Ischemia Course) for the first time in Poland.

The program of the conference is available HERE.

Thanksgiving Dinner 2017

Annual Thanksgiving Day Dinner event organized by Poznan University of Medical Sciences for students of the English language programs will take place in Collegium Stomatologicum on November 23 at 7pm.

The plan for the evening includes an award ceremony for students with outstanding academic achievements and a thanksgiving dinner, as well as student musical performances.

There will also be Facebook live streaming for the event – follow PUMS FB page for details.

Event regulations can be found at http://pums.ump.edu.pl/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Thanksgiving-regulations-2017.doc.

Visa Office open hours at the Dean’s Office

We will host a representative from the Voivodship Office’ immigrations to assist our students at the Dean’s Office on November 8th, between 10:45am and 12.45.

The oficer will gladly help with matters relating to:
-temporary stay card/visa application,
-legalization of stay in Poland,
-registration process and document requirements.

New partner in Greece

We are excited to announce a new partnership between PUMS and the Greek education services company The Study Rooms. We are hoping this new connection will help to promote the University on Greek and Cypriot markets, and that it will result in attracting new students from the Mediterranean region to our international community.

The Study Rooms was created, among others, in response to the needs of the Greek students for better quality educational services, which include both EFL learning as well as offering consultation and alternatives in the field of tertiary education. In their own words: “Our vast experience with students together with our client-centred philosophy has enabled us to offer tailor-made services to each student, which we’d like to further expand. Our vision is to make The Study Rooms a meeting point, a platform where Greek students and educational professionals grow, develop, and progress their careers and lives.”

Survey on harassment and sexual harassment

We invite all students to take a couple of minutes to fill out this national survey on the harassment and sexual harassment of students. The initiative by the Polish Commissioner for Human Right is aimed to estimate the scale of such incidents and to increase students’ safety and wellbeing in the future. The survey can be accessed via http://badania.pbs.pl/studenci.pg.

 

NCFMEA accreditation extended

Prof. Grzegorz Oszkinis, Director of PUMS Center for Medical Education in English took part in the delegation of the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education, Polish Accreditation Committee and Conference of Rectors of Medical Universities, to Washington, DC. The point of the meeting was to discuss extension of the US National Committee’s on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation (NCFMEA) accreditation for Polish medical schools.

The visit was the final step in a long evaluation process that resulted in the Polish side securing positive review and extension of the accreditation for another 3 years. Polish medical universities have been receiving positive evaluations continuously since 1997, which is a testimony to the high quality and good organization of Polish medical education and results in US students choosing Poland as one of their education destinations abroad.

Prof. Oszkinis was invited to join the delegation as a consultant and representative of the medical school that was first to open international programs in Poland and invited students from abroad as early as 1993. There are currently over 150 US citizens at PUMS and more than 600 have already graduated in the past.

Guest lecture: Prof Ingolf Cascorbi

A lecture on “Perspectives of Individualized Medicine” will be presented by our esteemed guest, pharmacology professor Ingolf Cascorbi from Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel. Please join us on Friday, October 13 at 10:30am in PUMS Medical Biology Center room 3008 at 8 Rokietnicka St.

Prof. Miguel Valderrábano Vázquez’s lecture on arrhythmia on Oct 10

Want to be a cardiologist? Internist? GP? This talk is for you!
Come and find out how to treat the most common arrhythmia in the World! Meet Miguel Valderrábano Vázquez – the head of cardiac electrophysiology at Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center in Houston, Texas, USA.

 

Q&A on US MD residency with Dr L. Kolankiewicz on OCT 2nd

Please join us for Q&A sessionEverything you would like to ask about US MD residency with an #alumnus of #PUMS Class of 2002, Dr Luiz M Kolankiewicz, MD, FASN, FS, Major USAFR, Chief of Section of Nephrology & Hypertension Inpatient Dialysis Unit, Director at White River Junction-VAMC
It will be on Monday, October 2nd 7-9pm at the Library (in seminar room C).

Inauguration of the Academic Year 2017/2018

Join us on October 3rd for the official inauguration of the academic year 2017/2018 ceremony in the Adam Mickiewicz University Auditorium at 1 Wieniawskiego St. at 11am! The event will include Rector’s inaugural address, freshmen matriculation, presentation of merit awards and a lecture on Chopin and medicine. The ceremony will be fully translated into English & broadcasted live on-line at http://www.ump.edu.pl/transmisja. We cordially invite all students, staff, faculty, alumni and friends of the University to attend.

Orientation Days for Freshmen!

New academic year is closing fast and new students are flying in to Poznan already. Starting from August 24th, we will be hosting Orientation Days events for them to welcome them to our School community and to provide all the basic information they will need in the upcoming months. See the schedule of the event on the following link

Andrew Wiktor – meetings on August 23rd

Dear Students,

This is to inform you about the visit of Mr. Andrew Wiktor to our University. Mr. Wiktor will be available to meet the students individually regarding US loan matters on Wednesday August 23, 2017 from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm in the Study Room in Karolek Dormitory (5E, Rokietnicka St. – 2nd floor). The meetings will take place every 15-20 minutes. Please sign up for meeting with Ms Agata Bartoszewska  (tel. + 48 61 854 7145, email: abartoszewska@ump.edu.pl). In the e-mail please provide your name, surname and programme. DEADLINE to sign up: August 21, 2017.

Mr Andrew Wiktor will be available also on Thursday, August 24, 2017 during Open Hours (12:15 – 2:00 pm) at the Library – Congress Center (37A, Przybyszewksiego Street).

With regards,
DEAN’S OFFICE

Medicine admissions closing soon!

We have almost filled up all of our available spots in the medical programs for the Fall 2017 entry – both in the 6-year and the Advanced program. This is why we will only be accepting new on-line applications for these programs until 6AM CEST on July 20, 2017, after which we will disable this possibility.
We will subsequently re-open admissions in September to start recruitment for the Fall 2018 entry.

Please note that it will still be possible to apply to Dentistry until July 31 and Pharmacy until the end of August.

Cooperation with The National Academy of Future Physicians

We are happy to announce the start of cooperation between PUMS and the US National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists – an organization dedicated to helping all young people who want to become physicians or medical scientists achieve their dream. (http://www.futuredocs.com).

Poznan University of Medical Sciences will become the host of the 2018 edition of the NAFPMS Future Docs Abroad program – a summer medical internship for high school students. Find out more baout the program at http://www.futuredocs.com/abroad/

We will also be present at the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Boston, MA, USA on Jun 25 to 27 meeting thousands of future doctors from all across the US.

Prof. Wartofsky and Mastorakos’s guest lectures on JUNE 22

We have the pleasure to host two eminent guest lecturers this week.

Professor Leonard Wartofsky, former Chief Editor of Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism and present Chief Editor of Endocrine Reviews, Visiting Professor and Doctor Honoris Causa of PUMS will talk about “Treatment of hypothyroidism: T4 or T4 + T3?” at 9am on 22nd June 2017 in room no. 2009 of Center for Medical Biology.

At 9.45, on the same day and in the same place Professor George Mastorakos, outstanding endocrinologist from National and Kapodistrina University of Athens (Greece) will give lecture on “Stress and Reproduction”.

Certificates of attendance will be provided for the lecture participants.

Graduation and White Coat Ceremonies

We cordially invite all students, their families and close ones, as well as faculty, staff and friends of our University to join us in celebrating two big events on June 5: graduation of students from the English-language programs, Class of 2017, and White Coat Ceremony for first year students.

Both events will take place in the Auditorium of Adam Mickiewicz University at 1 Wieniawskiego St., with Graduation Ceremony starting at 10am and White Coat Ceremony at 1pm.

For those of you who will not be able to be in Poznan on that day, we will be broadcasting live on-line via PUMS Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/PUMS.UMP/.

Recognition of Polish medical education in Norway

Earlier this year Mr. Bent Høie, the Minister of Health and Care Services of Norway, and Mr. Konstanty Radziwiłł, the Minister of Health of Poland, have issued a joint statement confirming full recognition of Polish professional medical education in Norway and assuring that the road to medical career in Norway is still open to graduates of Polish medical schools. The full text of the statement is available here.

Euroasmus soccer tournament 2017

City of Poznań invites You for the 6th edition of students international football tournament called euroasmus and friends cup 2017!
Gather your friends, complete a team and play for the championship!
Join event on fb (https://www.facebook.com/events/242770429537170/?fref=ts) find out all about it and be always up to date!

Hope to see You on the pitch June 8th 2017!

Tournament Director
Michał Kaczmarek
Poznań City Hall

NASG Canadian Event on May 19th!

If you’re thinking about taking the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) then we definitely recommend you join us TODAY for a short presentation and Q&A session regarding the exam! The presentation will cover logistics as well as exam prep. See you there!

STN/ Journal Club workshops at 17ICYMC

STN and Journal Club would like to invite you to take part in 7 free workshops during the 17th International Congress of Young Medical Scientists in Ponzan on 1st/ 2nd June:
1) Pediatric emergencies (in Simulation Centre),
2) Surgical suturing workshops,
3) Emergency in diabetology,
4) Insulin therapy in clinical practice,
5) Biopsy and trepanobiopsy- practical guide,
6) Neurophysiological diagnostics of patients with spinal cord injury,
7) Clinical trials- Highlights of Conduction Pharmaceutical Industry- sponsored Clinical Trials.

 

Registration starts on 21st May at 8 pm (registration form on the Facebook profile) and is available for everyone (you don’t have to pay the conference fee for active/passive participant).

Please check the exact time/place/hour on their posters/
Facebook profile: https://web.facebook.com/events/153207495181915/ or their website: www.icyms.ump.edu.pl.

Workshop entitled “Clinical trials- Highlights of Conduction Pharmaceutical Industry- sponsored Clinical Trials” is conducted by our guest Annette Niestroy-Janus, M.D., PUMS graduate from class of 2003, certified neurologist and therapeutic expert in neuroscience, experienced industry clinical researcher for global clinical trials, currently working as freelance consultant clinical trailist and medical advisor in the US and UK
https://www.linkedin.com/in/annette-janus-6b916aa7/

Guest lectures by Prof. William D. Foulkes

A cordial invitation from PUMS and the Academic & Scientific Poznan initiative to a series of open lectures by the renowned oncogeneticist and well-published researcher from McGill University School of Medicine, Prof. William D. Foulkes. The event will take place on May 22 in PUMS Library-Congress Center.

Application for student Residential Advisors open

Students interested in volunteering as residential advisors in university dormitories are requested to apply on-line via this link.

Academic Sports Day – May 11

The 44th annual PUMS Academic Sports Day will take place on Thursday, May 11th this week. The program is packed with events from various sports disciplines, including basketball, soccer, volleyball, fitness, tennis, american football, track & field and table tennis. The games will be held in University sports hall, on the playing field, as well as on the tennis courts, starting from 9:45am. See you there!

Important Dates: Applicants and Freshmen 2017/2018

Final Application deadline:
MEDICINE and DENTISTRY: JULY 31, 2017
PHARMACY and PHYSIOTHERAPY: AUGUST 31, 2017

Newly accepted students’ dormitory preferences must be submitted online by July 31, 2017 at the latest.

Information confirming dormitory assignments will be e-mailed to all students concerned no sooner than the first week of August 2017.

First part of the Pre-study course provided online, mandatory for the 6MD, DDS, PharmD and Physiotherapy Programs will be held on July 31 – August 18, 2017.

Incoming students may start moving into the dormitories on August 18, 2017 at the earliest.

Orientation Days for students accepted to the first year for the academic year 2017/2018 will be held on August 23 (Wednesday) – August 27, 2017 (Sunday) at PUMS.

Second part of the Pre-study Course held at PUMS, mandatory for the 6MD, DDS, PharmD and Physiotherapy Programs will be held on August 28 – September 22, 2017.

August 28 – September 1, 2017 – beginning of classes for the first year of the AdvMD Program.

Last week of September 2017 – beginning of classes for the 6MD, DDS, PharmD and Physiotherapy Programs.

AMSA USMLE Residency Event on April 26th

AMSA is hosting a live interactive webinar with the International Trustee of AMSA who will be giving advice specifically catered to PUMS students in regards to how to break into the US medical residency system as an IMG!

The event entails the ins an outs of applying and crushing Step 1 and 2, obtaining electives, how to network with program directors to obtain such opportunities, what’s the process of applying to residency programs based on different specialties, boards during residencies, and how to maximize your future application to overcome any shortcomings that each IMG faces.

Come join us this Wednesday APRIL 26th at 7:30 in Room 2.09 (Main Library)!
PS Pizza and refreshments will be served 🙂

Hope to see you there 🙂 Happy studying

NASG Match Event on Apr 25!

Join us on Tuesday, April 25th as we celebrate the success of our PUMS grads who matched into US residencies all over the country! We couldn’t be prouder!!! 🙌🏼 💯

Come find out where they’re headed and learn the keys to their success! This is the event you DON’T want to miss! #celllllllabrategoodtimes#theydoctorsnow

II International Student Congress of Medical Sciences

We have the honor of invite to the second edition of International Student Congress of Medical Sciences -Frontiers in Neurology, Neuropharmacology and Neurophysiology .​

​This year, we have decided to broaden contents and we function as a part of the bigger project called “Frontiers in Neurology, Neuropharmacology and Neurophysiology”. It has two main parts and the first one will be realized on 6th May 2017.
(More information about this event: http://konferencjaneurologiczna.pl/)

In terms of conference on 13th May 2017, we have organized four main sections. Two plenar sessions  tell participants few words about new trends within Neurology, Neuropharmacology and Neurophysiology. Besides great content-related part, eminent lecturers, we would like to stimulate students to present their original dissertation. Specially for them  we have created student session. During last part our Guests will have a possibility to meet specialists who work all over the world. They will ask not only to medical questions but they touch on humanitarian aspect and voluntary service.

We encourage to acquaint with full offer our project and active participation.

​See you soon in Poznań!

WHEN? 13th May 2017

Registration page: https://sknneurofizjologow.wixsite.com/konferencja/rejestracja

Our website: https://sknneurofizjologow.wixsite.com/konferencja

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/769725299861022/

Dr Jens Madsen’s guest lecture

We have the pleasure to host dr. Jens Madsen, BSc, MSc, PhD from University of Southampton as a guest lecturer this week. Dr. Madsen is an Associate Professor in Child Health with a research focus on airways and the importance of innate immunity for the maintenance of a normal healthy lung and during infection, inflammation and repair processes.

In an open lecture on April 21, 2017, the guest will talk about “Innate Immunity – the GP of your Immune System” at 11am in room 116 of K. Jonscher Clinical Hospital at 27/33 Szpitalna St.

Happy Easter!

Best Easter wishes to all of PUMS Students, Alumni, Faculty, Staff and Friends! Have a relaxing break with your families and close ones!

Taiwanese curriculum pathway for DDS and Advanced MD programs

In response to the updated Principles for the Recognition and Acceptance of Academic Credits in Medical Departments of Foreign Universities and Colleges in force since January 1, 2017, Poznan University of Medical Sciences will introduce an elective “Taiwanese” curricular pathway for those of the incoming students who are interested in practicing either of the two medical professions in Taiwan after graduation.

These pathways will be available in our Dentistry and Advanced Medical programs and will entail increased coursework with main emphasis on clinical practice. Thanks to these adjustments, the programs will be fully compatible with the latest guidelines set by the government and licensing authorities in Taiwan, as it is currently the case with the 6-year Medical Program for high school graduates.

More information on the new curricular pathway will be available soon.

Winners of SimChallenge 2017 at PUMS

The School finals of this year’s edition of SimChallenge medical simulation competition are now complete. Congratulations to the winning team that will be representing our School in the national finals in Katowice in May:

Anna Simoniuksztis
Ewa Grelowska
Adam Janicki
Jakub Hypki
Witold Kwietniak

but also to the other skilled finalists:

2nd place:
Rafał Mazurek
Maciej Kasprzyk
Aleksy Nowak
Michał Piaseczny
Arkadiusz Stachowicz

3rd place:
Ridha Ali
Paul Brodzik
Conrad Kozlowski
Dorothy Mitkowski

The winners of the Polish national competition will go to Paris to compete against teams from all over the world during the Annual Meeting of SESAM – Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine.

The final round of the PUMS finals has been recorded and is now available at https://www.facebook.com/536721969675760/videos/1652431851438094/.

The event was also attended by the local media – read the report (in Polish only) at http://www.gloswielkopolski.pl/wiadomosci/a/poznanscy-studenci-ratowali-najwazniejsza-osobe-w-kraju,11956524.

3rd McMaster Intenational Review Course in Internal Medicine

Don’t miss the opportunity to attend the 3rd McMaster International Review Course in Internal Medicine (MIRCIM 2017), taking place in the beautiful historic city of Kraków, Poland on May 12th and 13th, 2017!

The two-day course features lectures delivered by outstanding experts, from authors of clinical practice guidelines to researchers behind the breakthrough trials that shape the modern standards in medicine. For the first time, satellite events are available on May 11 (Thursday), including a conference on evidence-based medicine supervised by Professor Gordon Guyatt and a series of practical workshops for physicians. Great educational experience for doctors and students. Visit www.mircim.eu for more information and to register!

SimChallenge 2017 School finals

PUMS finals of the 2017 edition of SimChallenge – a medical simulation competition for students – will take place on April 5 at noon in room 1010 of the Medical Biology Center at 8 Rokietnicka St. in Poznan.

The three teams who have won the qualifiers will compete against each other to win a chance to partake in the national finals in Katowice and the European finals, organized by the Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM).

Anyone who is interested is invited to attend and to cheer for the contestants. The teams will put their skills to the test on the state-of-the-art SimMan 3G patient simulator – one of the most modern machines of this type in Poland.

More information is available on the event’s Facebook page.

Dental Workshop Series 2017

PUMS Dental Student Association invites all interested DDS students and graduates to their annual workshop. It includes an open lecture on “Full Veneer Protocol: From Alignment to Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Restorations” by our alumni and faculty, Dr. Marco Roy & Dr. Adam Piosik, on April 8, but also a practical workshop section on April 22.

More details are available at https://www.facebook.com/events/181058845742658/.

Poznan International School of Ultrasonography

“Are you on the 4th, 5th or 6th grade of medical studies? Are you interested in ultrasound diagnostics? You need an occasion to use your knowledge in practice? And do it in the new, inspiring place with interesting peple?

From 2nd to 7th July we are giving you the possibility not only to improve your knowledge in the field of ultrasound diagnostic, but first of all to bring you a unique opportunity to PRACTICE IT in the best clinics of Poznań University of Medical Sciences.
What exactly does it mean?

– spend one week in Poznań and have almost 50 hours of practise and theoretic lessons in ultrasonography: abdominal, vascular, gynecological , endocrine and much more!

– unique occasion to make new acquaintances and meet interesting people from other countries!

– amazing social programme will give you an opportunity to know better the city of Poznań – the capital of Wielkopolska, mixture of new and old, full of old monuments and modern attractions, teaming with students and youth!

– accommodation and catering in Poznań at ATTRACTIVE PRICES!!!
Price: 100 Euro/ 400 zł

More information soon at https://www.facebook.com/events/1677866175847825/!

We hope to see you soon in Poznań!”

Guest lectures by Prof. Oliver Kayser

PUMS Vice-Rector for HR and International Cooperation, Prof. Jaroslaw Walkowiak, invites all students, graduates, faculty and staff to a series of lectures on Pharmaceutical Biochemistry by Prof. Oliver Kayser – a specialist in technical biochemistry from the Technical University of Dortmund.

Free legal advice and information for foreign citizens in Poznan

If you are looking for legal advice, help with formalities of Poznan’s public offices, immigrations, etc., or are simply in need of basic information regarding living and studying in Poznan, it might be worth contacting one of the two resources that are offering this type of services free of charge for foreign citizens in Poznan:

-Migrant Info Point – funded by the Poznan City Hall,
-Centre of Leagal Advice for Foreigners at the European University of Business.

Meeting with an Alumnus

The Irish and British Student Group extends a cordial invitation to a meeting with an alumnus of PUMS, Dr Simon Corcoran, who is currently in internship in Ireland as a geriatric internist:

10th Annual European Head & Neck Course

This November we will be hosting the 10th Annual European Head and Neck Course, covering the current management of head and neck cancer within a multidisciplinary framework.

The format will consist of lectures, panel discussions and operative techniques. There will be a series of keynote addresses dealing with some of the more controversial topics. There will be time allocated for audience participation through question and answer sessions.

The course is suitable both for trainees (residents and fellows) in ENT, Maxillofacial, Plastics and Oncology in preparation for exams, as well as providing a stimulating update for practicing surgeons and physicians.

Visit the event’s official website for details: http://www.eurohnc.com/

Intercultural Medical Care conference

“Intercultural Medical Care as a Challenge for Interdisciplinary Teams” conference will take place on May 19 and 20, 2017 at PUMS.

The  aim  of  the  scientific  programme  is to fully demonstrate the everyday character, built from working with  intercultural  patients. During the Conference, the best experts  from  Poland and abroad will  be  lecturing  and  presenting  various examples on such matters.

Special guests of the conference include: historian and religion expert, Michael Schudrich, the president of EDUNET, Victor Dudau, as well as supermodel, UN special ambassador and activist fighting against female genital mutilation, Waris Dirie.

Find out more at http://interculture-medical-care.pl.

SPS and AMSA Teddy Bear Drive hospital visit

A big thank you to all the contributors and donors involved in the Teddy Bear Drive toy collection for children patients of K. Jonscher’s PUMS Clinical Hospital. Special words of appreciation go to the members of the Student Pediatric Society (SPS) and the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) who organized this charity initiative and keep on contributing to this and other causes on a yearly basis.

“It’s always a thing of joy to be able to put more smiles on the faces of children. Love is born through the giving of kindness and so on behalf of SPS and AMSA, we say a huge Thank you to everyone who loved on these children by donating a Teddy bear. Your love and kindness were totally felt in the hearts of these beautiful young children and seen in their adorable smiles. Thank you =) ”.

Best Wishes,
Precious Patrick E.

Photos from the hospital visit concluding the drive on February 28 are available HERE.

17th International Congress of Young Medical Scientists

PUMS Student Scientific Society extends a cordial invitation to the 17th edition of the annual International Congress of Young Medical Scientists.

The aim of the event is to give young and talented researchers from all over the world not only possibilities to present their achievements, share their ideas and views, but also to take part in professionally organized workshops and courses where they can meet other gifted and enthusiastic young researchers who share their fascination for medical knowledge.

More information will be available on the event’s page at https://www.facebook.com/events/153207495181915/.

Prof. Maria Siemionow’s lectures in April

Learn from the best! – Prof. Siemionow, who led the team that performed the world’s 1st near-full face transplant, will be giving lectures at PUMS in April.

Guest lecture: Prof. Enrique Rodilla Sala

“Dear Academic Staff and Students,

I would like to invite you to  participate in the lecture “Subclinical target organ damage in the management of cardiovascular diseases” that will be conducted by a guest of our university, Prof. Enrique Rodilla Sala.

Prof. E. Rodilla Sala is a scientist and academic teacher of the Catholic University of  Cardenal Herrera in Valencia (Spain).

The lecture in English will be held on March 3, 2017 at. 11:00,  in lecture hall no. 116 in Clinical Hospital of Karol Jonscher at 27/33 Szpitalna Street.”

Prof. Jarosław Walkowiak, MD, PhD
Vice-Rector for HR and International Relations

NASG Elective Workshop on Feb 23rd

NASG presents part 2 of their annual elective workshop series: Ask the Experts!
A panel of students who recently completed their elective rotations in North America are here to answer all of your questions- hope to see you there!


9th International Conference of Contemporary Oncology

The 9th International Conference of Contemporary Oncology will take place in Poznan on March 22-24, 2017. The event is organized by the Greater Poland Cancer Center, PUMS Department of Medical Biotechnology and International Institute For Molecular Oncology in Poznan, as well as the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, USA).

The leading theme of the Conference is the Genom-based Precision Oncology – Direct Targeting and Immune-targeting of Cancer. Lectures will be given by invited eminent guest speakers and international experts. To find out more please visit: http://www.termedia.pl/Konferencje?Program&e=604&p=4245.

NASG annual Step 1 event on Feb 9

NASG annual (and critically acclaimed) Step 1 event is finally scheduled to take place next Thursday, February 9th, at 7PM in the library auditorium. They’ve got a great panel ready to share their Step 1 secrets and keys to success. And as usual, there will be a Q&A session with pizza to follow!

2nd European Laryngological Live Surgery Broadcast

Video recordings from the 2016 2nd European Laryngological Live Surgery Broadcast are now available at http://els.livesurgery.net/video.php. The topics of the event included:

  • benign and malignant pathology of the larynx,
  • open and endoscopic procedures,
  • laser and robotic surgeries,
  • phonosurgery.

This professional web conference took place on November 30, 2016. It is organized annually by PUMS Department of Otolaryngology and the European Laryngological Society with the help of Poznan Supercomputing and Networking Center. The idea is to demonstrate and discuss live ENT surgeries by leading European specialist surgeons. This edition transmitted procedures performed in Genoa, Barcelona, Marseille, Luxembourg, Giessen, Leiden, Essen, Cagliari and Poznan.

Annual Teddy Bear Drive

Join the Annual Teddy Bear Drive – a charity collection of toys for children patients in one of PUMS clinical hospitals – organized by our Student Pediatric Society and local AMSA division. The donations will be collected throughout February.

For more info please contact the groups directly:
SPS: https://www.facebook.com/groups/182108155959
AMSA: https://www.facebook.com/amsapums

“Neonatus” International Neonatal Conference in Poznan

The 5th “Neonatus” International Neonatal Conference will take place on September 28 and 29, 2017 in Poznan. It is dedicated to a clinically useful infant care, addressed to neonatologists, pediatricians, anesthesiologists and children surgeons  with a strong emphasis on clinical investigations supported by evidence based medicine. Meetings have fixed sessions: Postgraduate Education, News, Treatment / Diagnosis: Effective Vs. ineffective, Multicenter clinical study, Research reports and practical workshops.

Detailed program and registration form is available at http://neonatus.org/en/program-3/.

Success in cardiac surgery

Just before Christmas the cardiosurgery team at the Lord’s Transfiguration PUMS Clinical Hospital has performed a complicated but successful procedure of implantation of a superlight and small HeartMate 3 artificial heart pump support device. The procedure, including the surgical operation and adjusting the parameters  of the device, took 6 hours. The operating team, lead by prof. Marek Jemielity, was assisted by fellow cardiac surgeons from Germany and Croatia.

The Thoratec HeartMate 3 is a left ventricular assist system (LVAS) designed to supplement the pumping function of the heart and to help circulate blood throughout the body for a broad range  of patients with of advanced heart failure. It can be a temporary solutions for patients awaiting a heart transplant, but it can also serve as a long-term artificial heart support for people who do not qualify for a transplant. Made of plastic and metal, it weighs 450g and its size is 7.5cm, making it the smallest circulatory support device approved by the US FDA. It costs around 120,000 USD. HeartMate works together with the heart and does not require its removal.

The patient is feeling well and was back on his feet a few days after the procedure. He is now undergoing rehabilitation, which will allow him to lead a normal life and return to work.

PUMS alumnus Dr. Ganapathy awarded at Berkeley College

We are proud of PUMS alumnus – Dr. Mandanna Ganapathy, MD – for receiving the Faculty of the Year award for Outstanding Teaching at Berkeley College!

Dr. Ganapathy has graduated from our English-language medical program in 1998. He is currently a teaching member of the Health Sciences Faculty at Berkeley College School of Health Studies.

Read more at: http://newsroom.berkeleycollege.edu/news/mandanna-ganapathy-md-of-paramus-nj-receives-berkeley-college-faculty-of-the-year-award

Holiday Season

In the Christmas and New Year’s week the Dean’s Office will be closed on the following days:

– December 19, 2016 from 1 pm
– December 23-26, 2016
– December 30, 2016
– January 6, 2017

The authorities and the staff of the Center for Medical Education in English want to wish you a Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Poznań Silent Night 2016

Dear international students,

on December 15th (Thursday at 17:00) very special Christmas event will take place in our City. We are happy to invite you to create multilingual choir and sing together Christmas Carol “Silent Night” in as many languages as possible. Let’s meet, sing, cheer and spend time together in our multicultural and multinational Poznań. Many languages, one carol, a common message of love and joy!

Everyone feel free to come and celebrate Christmas time together.
Check out more details @studyin.poznan.pl <http://www.poznan.pl/mim/studia/en/news/poznan-silent-night-2016,100688.html>.

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Facebook live transmission of Thanksgiving dinner gala

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We are happy to share that our annual Thanksgiving dinner gala will be broadcasted live on-line via our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/PUMS.UMP.

Join us on Thursday, November 24 at 7pm CET!

 

Workshops by dr. David Klein

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Detailed schedule available at Schedule

Thanksgiving Dinner 2016

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During the Ceremony, the Director of the Center for Medical Education in English, Prof. Grzegorz Oszkinis, will present awards to outstanding students for their achievements in the academic year 2015/2016.

The dress code is formal.

Please note that alcoholic drinks and smoking are forbidden during this event.
The dinner will end at 10pm.

We hope to see you there! Please bring your ticket (available with your class representatives) and student ID card.

The safety regulations for the incoming Thanksgiving Dinner event click here to open PDF file
Please make sure to get acquainted with them, if you plan to attend the event.

Sincerely,
Dean’s Office

 

Gloria Medicinae medal for prof. Wojciech Golusinski

We are proud to inform that prof. Wojciech Golusiński, Head of PUMS Department of Head and Neck Surgery, was awarded the highest honor in the Polish medical community – Gloria Medicinae medal by the Polish Medical Society. The award is a recognition of outstanding achievements in the field of medicine and for exemplary service to patients and to the community.

Congratulations!

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2nd European Laryngological Live Surgery Broadcast

A cordial invitation to an exciting live surgery on-line event in the field of laryngology. The 2nd European Laryngology Live Surgery Broadcast is organized by PUMS Department of Otolaryngology in cooperation with the European Laryngological Society and Poznan Supercomputing and Networking Center, and brings together world-class specialists in the field to discuss cases, perform and comment live surgeries.

Tune in to this fantastic learning opportunity on November 30 from 9am to 4pm CET at http://els.livesurgery.net/.

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Best Otolaryngology clinic in Poland

Once again, PUMS Department of Otolaryngology was ranked the No. 1 clinic of its kind in Poland by The Medical Tribune Polska. The announcement was made during the award ceremony of the Graeme Clark Foundation scholarship for one of the clinic’s patients, Ms. Marta Mikula. Marta is on of 1,300 patients who have received a cochrane implant at the PUMS clinic, since we have started administering the procedure in 1994.

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The clinic is also the national coordinating unit of the newborn hearing screening program. Financed by the Great Orchestra of Christmas Charity, the program has already successfully screened 5 million newborns for hearing impairments. Early detection of hearing impairments allows children to get the help they need and lead normal lives.

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While providing high-quality specialized medical procedures and research, the clinic and its Head, prof. Witold Szyfter, are constantly developing international cooperation and peer-learning system  by scientific cooperation and training visits by specialist doctors from centers in countries like Italy, Austria, Japan and Sweden. The clinic is also host to the annual European Laryngological Live Surgery Broadcast events, bringing together best medical experts in the field for live on-line conference-surgery sessions: http://els.livesurgery.net/.

PUMS Alumni Newsletter issue No. 2

The second issue of our Alumni Newsletter is now out! Download it from here.

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PUMS at Academia Lebanon Fairs in Beirut

Visit our stand at the Academia Lebanon International College Fair 2016 in Beirut, Lebanon, to find out more about PUMS and our English-language programs! The event will take place on October 31 and November 1 from 10am to 3pm in Hilton Beirut Metropolitan Palace.

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5 years of “PUMS in Indonesia” project

With their 5th annual expedition this year, the “PUMS in Indonesia” initiative completed another successful volunteer undertaking. This unique project involves partnering with Kaohsiung Medical University from Taiwan to bring free medical aid to underdeveloped parts of Indonesia. The faculty, alumni and students are commiting to this service together during their own vacation time, using their own funds – which are also used to buy all the medical supplies – and working dawn till dusk with local patients. Apart from medical aid, they are also educating the local communities on proper teeth brushing, benefits of breastfeeding, etc.

Click on the photo below to watch a video summary of their service. More information is available at https://www.facebook.com/PUMS-in-Indonesia-pomagamy-we-help-118895781780186/.

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Course on Skin Tumors and Inflammatory Dermatoses

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Dear Colleagues,
Pathologists and Residents in Pathology as well as Dermatologists

The long life learning is a part of medical practice. Some of diseases are known for centuries but diagnostic standards and classifications as well as prognosis and treatment modalities are changing. For many pathologists skin lesions neoplastic as well non-neoplastic are very interesting issues and sometimes challenging diagnostic cases.
We are pleased to welcome you to Poznan for a course with practical impact which will be given by excellent tutors from Harvard Medical University, Massachusetts General Hospital.
See you in Poznan, soon!

 
Prof. Andrzej Marszałek

EPSU Halloween party

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Students from the English Programs Students Union are organizing the annual Halloween party on October 28. You can find out more details about the event at: https://www.facebook.com/events/118667178601796/.

Prof. A. Jakubowiak’s guest lectrues

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Dear Colleagues,

Vice-Dean of Faculty of Medicine II of the Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Assoc. Prof. Lidia Gil, along with the City of Poznań, cordially invite you to public lectures presented by Prof. Andrzej Jakubowiak, MD, PhD – an internationally known expert on hematology, Director of Myeloma Program Section of Hematology/Oncology at University of Chicago Medical Center.

As the leader of a multi-center study, Prof. Jakubowiak discovered a highly effective drug combination for myeloma patients. He authored over 50 research papers published in the best international journals and several books chapters. Professor Jakubowiak is a frequently invited lecturer, honorable speaker at many medical meetings around the world. He was reviewer for several scientific journals and was awarded numerous research grants and honors for his translational research bringing the most important laboratory discoveries to clinical practice.

Professor is an alumnus of Poznań University Medical Sciences from 1997 and is a Visiting Professor at our University. The two lectures will take place at Collegium Anatomicum (6 Święcickiego Street, Poznań) in Prof. Różycki Lecture Hall:

“Multiple Myeloma – Is it Now Curable?” on November 2nd (Wednesday) at 1:30 PM

and

“Making career in medicine” on November 3rd (Thursday) at 2:00 PM.

 

Lidia Gil, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
Vice-Dean of Medical Faculty II
For Research and Development

Honorary degree for prof. Eli Y. Adashi

PUMS has awarded Prof. Eli Y. Adashi with a honoris causa doctorate degree. Dr. Adashi is a professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Brown University in Providence, RI, USA, world-renowned Ob/Gyn specialist, Senior Consultant for Women’s Health in the World at US Secretary of State and a member of the Board of Directors of Physicians for Human Rights and of Population Connection. His scientific work earned him an impressive citation index of 18 155 and a Hirsch index of 77.

The award recognizes his achievements in reproductive medicine and women’s healthcare management, but also his long-standing and fruitful cooperation with our University: guest lectures, research projects, post-graduate training and student exchange.

The award ceremony also celebrated Prof. Adashis love for classical music, in particular Frederic Chopin’s music, with the talented pianist Piotr Zukowski’s performance of two of Chopin’s polonaises.

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NASG NBME event

Invitation for an info session by PUMS North American Student Group:

“Thursday, October 20th come on over to the library for our annual NBME workshop! Find out what the NBME exams are all about and get invaluable information on how to ace those exams from students who have taken them in the past!”

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PUMS Research Fair 2016

A joint effort of PUMS Journal Club and PUMS section of AMSA brings you the first PUMS Research Fair – an event aimed to increase the involvment of students in research and promote the School’s science interest groups of PUMS Student Scientific Society (STN).

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Conference-workshop on medical errors

“To err is human”
Alexander Pope (1668-1744)

Dear STUDENTS and DOCTORS,

Poznan University of Medical Sciences invites you to a Conference-Workshop:

‘When things go wrong’
Exploring the reasons, results and remedies for medical errors

As in every area of life, errors in medical practice are bound occur. Our challenge is to understand why they happen, how best to reduce them, and how to support everyone involved  – patients and professionals – when an error has occurred. Join us for this Conference where through interactive presentations and small group workshops, a panel of highly experienced clinicians will be facing up to this challenge.

Monday 24th October 2016 at 4,30 p.m. room 3009 in PUMS Medical Biology Centre, 8 Rokietnicka Str.

The main speaker and the chairman will be PUMS Visiting Professor: Prof Richard Vincent

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Senior Consultant Cardiologist; Formerly Co-founder and Associate Dean Brighton and Sussex Medical School; Founding Head, Institute of Postgraduate Medicine Brighton and Sussex Medical School;
Recent Chair of Executive Committee, PRIME Partnerships in International Medical Education

Co-chaired by:

Dr Aleksandra Bojarska, Consultant Anaesthetist, University Hospital of South Manchester, UK
Undergraduate, Postgraduate and International PRIME Tutor,
Dr Lena Lobakk,  Dentist, Secretary and Editor of the Norwegian Dental Forensic Society, Norway, Undergraduate, Postgraduate International PRIME Tutor

Certificates of Attendance will be provided.
Registration via e-mail address ekaniewska@ump.edu.pl untill October 19th

Students have permission to attend the conference-workshop as an alternative to their regular classes or clinical work.

 

PUMS at the European Education Fair in Taiwan

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A great opportunity to meet with our representatives and find out more about our School is coming to Taiwan next week – we will be available at the Warsaw Trade Office’s stand at the European Education Fair Taiwan on October 14 and 15 in Taipei, and then on October 16 in Taichung.

NASG Fall book sale event

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The Fall edition of the student book sale event organized by the North American Student Group will take place this Sunday!

Inauguration of the academic year 2016/2017

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Join us today for the official inauguration of the academic year 2016/2017 ceremony in the Adam Mickiewicz University Auditorium at 1 Wieniawskiego St. at 11am! The event will include symbolic succession of Rector’s duties, matriculation of 1st year students and presenting university awards.

For those that will not be able to make it, we are also streaming the event live on-line at http://www.ump.edu.pl/aktualnosci/transmisja-inauguracji-roku-akademickiego-20162017.

Prof. Eli Y. Adashi’s guest lectures

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Guest lectures by prof. Eli Y. Adashi – visiting professor and honoris causa doctor at PUMS:

“Eggs and Sperm from a Buccal Smear” – 11am,
“Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy” – 3.45pm

October 3, 2016 in prof. Głyda’s lecture room on BA level in Ob/Gyn PUMS Clinical Hospital at Polna St.

Prof. Adashi is a world-renowned Ob/Gyn specialist, Senior Consultant for Women’s Health in the World at US Secretary of State and a member of the Board of Directors of Physicians for Human Rights and of Population Connection.

NASG are recruiting new members

nasg_application The North American Student Group of PUMS is recruiting new representatives for the new academic year. Find out more at this link.

Dr James Huang’s guest lectures

Guest Lectures

During the upcoming open days in Collegium Stomatologicum on September 8, we will be hosting a guest speaker – dr James Huang from Taiwan, a renowned expert in implant dentistry. Dr Huang will give two lectures:

  1. 3-4pm “Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation and Decrease in Arterial Pressure by Endodontic Therapy: A New Etiology of Syncope”
  2. 4-5pm “The New Era of CBCT in Dentistry”

The lectures will take place in room 202 of Collegium Stomatologicum and will be open for all interested visitors.

You can review dr Huang’s bio below:

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  • Diploma, Yuanpei College – Department of Radiology
  • Fellowship of International College of Dentistry
  • China-japan Friendship Hospital :Guest Professor
  • Professor of Kaohsiung Medical University
  • Visiting Professor of National University (Philippines)
  • Standing Director of Taiwan Academy of Implant Dentistry
  • Post-graduate study at University of Groningen Netherlands
  • Masters of Kaohsiung Medical University – College of Dental Medicine
  • President of Taiwan Dental Association
  • Chief of Dentistry, St. Paul’s Hospital
  • Chief Instructor, Taiwan Anker Implant System
  • First successful case of implantation in renal transplant patient
  • Training Dentist, Department of Dentistry, National Taiwan University
  • Member of National Health Insurance Supervisory Committee
  • Member of National Health Insurance Medical Expenditure Negotiation Committee
  • Member of Medical Claims Review Committee, Bureau of National Health Insurance
  • Member of National Health Insurance Dispute Mediation Committee
  • Advisor of the Office of the President of Taiwan

Forensic project for Ukrainian television

The Ukrainian television 1+1 has requested our help with an investigation into Ukrainian history – a specialist team of scientists from our Forensic Medicine and Neuroradiology Departments has been tasked with identifying the remains found in the tomb of Yaroslav the Wise, the Grand Prince of Kievan Rus’ from 11th century.

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The team was led by dr. Dorota Lorkiewicz-Muszynska, MSc, PhD – forensic anthropologist – and also included: dr. Julia Sobol, MD, PhD – forensic pathologist – and dr. Wojciech Kociemba, MD, PhD – expert radiologist.
In order to recreate the facial features of the subject, the scientists were also supported by a specialist in virtual engineering from Poznan University of Technology, dr. Michal Rychlik, EGD, and an illustration artist – Miroslaw Kuzma.

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The PUMS team has analyzed previous CT scans of the remains that were made when the tomb, situated in Kiev’s Saint Sophia’s Cathedral, was opened in 2009, as well as earlier reports from other scientists who researched this topic. Based on this data and the team’s own supplementary x-ray and anthropological analysis, they have created a 3D model of the skull, and proceeded to reconstructing muscles and layers of soft tissue. Facial approximation was generated with the use of computer 3D technology and supplemented in detail with an artistic vision of the face and of the whole head to complete the final 3D model.

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The mysterious female remains, resting alongside Prince Yaroslav, most likely belonged to his second wife, Ingegerd Olofsdotter of Sweden.

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The case was presented in the documentary “Ukraine. Return to History.” – which is now available on YouTube (in Ukrainian, starts at 29:23):

Photo credits:
-1-6 and 9-10 – Markian Kaniuka, 1+1 TV,
-7 – Wojciech Kociemba, PUMS,
-11-12 – Michal Rychlik, PUT,
-8 and 13-16 – Dorota Lorkiewicz-Muszynska, PUMS,
-17 – Miroslaw Kuzma, artist,
-18 – Dorota Lorkiewicz-Muszynska and Miroslaw Kuzma with the help of a computer graphics artist from 1+1

New University Authorities commence their term

Once in every four years the University community elects its representatives for the Senate and all the highest academic offices. Throughout the first months of 2016, the School staff and faculty have made their decisions in a series of voting procedures. Meet the newly elected officials for the term of 2016-2020:

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Rector: Prof. Andrzej Tykarski, MD, PhD – the highest office will be represented by prof. Tykarski, a PUMS alumnus, specialist physician in angiology and hypertensiology and current Head of the Department of Hypertensiology, Angiology and Internal Medicine, working at the Lord’s Transfigurations Hospital in Poznan. His previous appointments in University administration included: various functions in the Senate, Dean of the Medical Faculty II and Vice-Rector for Organization, Promotion and Development.

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Vice-Rectors:

-VR for Student Affairs: Prof. Edmund Grzeskowiak, MD, PhD,
-VR for Education and Post-Graduate Training: Prof. Ryszard Marciniak, MD, PhD,
-VR for Organization, Promotion and Regional Coordination: Prof. Michal Musielak, MD, PhD,
-VR for Science and Development: Prof. Michal Nowicki, MD, PhD,
-VR for Human Resources and International Cooperation: Prof. Jaroslaw Walkowiak, MD, PhD.

Deans:

-Dean of Medical Faculty I: Prof. Ewa Wender-Ozegowska, MD, PhD,
-Dean of Medical Faculty II: Prof. Zbigniew Krasinski, MD, PhD,
-Dean of Faculty of Pharmacy: Prof. Lucjusz Zapruko, MPharm, PhD,
-Dean of Faculty of Health Sciences: Assoc. Prof. Malgorzata Kotwicka, MSc, PhD.
 

The new authorities are taking office starting from September 1, 2016.

Orientation Days for Freshmen

New academic year is closing fast and new students are flying in to Poznan already. Starting from August 24th, we will be hosting Orientation Days events for them to welcome them to our School community and to provide all the basic information they will need in the upcoming months. See the schedule of the event below:

OD_schedule_18Aug 16-page-001

 

Geriatric Department is working on bioactive textiles

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PUMS Geriatrics Department is involved in a consortium effort that developed innovative bioactive textiles enabled with healing capacities and intended for dermatological patients. The cooperation with Institute of Natural Fibres and Medicinal Plants, Lodz Univeristy of Technology and Marko-Kolor sp. J. textile company resulted in creating new textiles allowing production of clothing that can treat dermatoses with the use of microspheres containing active herbal extracts. Read more at: www.innovationintextiles.com/fibres-yarns-fabrics/polish-consortium-develops-bioactive-textiles-for-dermatological-patients.

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Students bring medical aid to Kenya

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This inspiring group of PUMS med students is a great proof of how far can a lot of determination and a little good will take you. Starting off from a simple idea, they have managed to send 7.5 ton of medical equipment, clothes and gifts to Africa and they are currently on a 5-week mission to support local hospitals in Kitui region in Kenya. And that’s the 3rd year in a row they managed to do this!

Follow them at Leczymy z Misją and help out by contributing to their operation fund!

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PUMS volunteer medical aid to Indonesia

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Once again, the team of “PUMS in Indonesia” volunteer medical initiative is undertaking an expedition to bring free medical aid to underdeveloped parts of Indonesia. Investing their own time and money, and working hard in very difficult conditions they are trying to help as many people as they can during their annual volunteer service trips.

This unique initiative operates in partnership with Kaohsiung Medical University and brings together members of PUMS faculty (dr Chudzicka-Strugala, dr E. Madry, dr R. Madry), alumni (S. Piotrowska-Brudnicka, D. Brudnicki, dr Winardi, dr Jiun Chyi Hwang), as well as current students (S. Paschke, P. Popowicz, K. Ito, F. Karim, T-H Kuan, L. Hu and F. Mezque).

You can follow their activities and show your support at https://www.facebook.com/PUMS-in-Indonesia-pomagamy-we-help-118895781780186/.

Application deadline for Dentistry has passed

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We have almost filled up all of our available spots in the dental program for the Fall 2016 entry. This is why we have disabled the option to register new applicants.

However, it is still possible to apply for Pharmacy and Physiotherapy until Aug 31.”

Rector Wysocki awarded in Edinburgh

The Rector of PUMS, Prof. Jacek Wysocki, was awarded an honorary degree at the University of Edinburgh in recognition of his support for the Edinburgh’s Polish School of Medicine.

Celebrating the 75th anniversary of its founding, the Polish School of Medicine, is a unique case of a sovereign state setting up its own faculty as part of another country’s university. It was established during the World War 2, after the invasion of Poland, in order to enable the Polish students in exile to complete their medical education. It also provided a continuity between the pre- and post-war PUMS as a medical school.

And although the last degrees were awarded by the PSM in 1949, the ties between PUMS and UoE last until this day, as manifested by scholarship opportunities and close collaboration.

Read more at http://www.ed.ac.uk/news/2016/polish-medical-links-celebrated.

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Dentistry admissions closing soon!

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We have almost filled up all of our available spots in our dental program for the Fall 2016 entry. This is why we will only be accepting new on-line applications for these programs until midnight CEST on July 28, 2016, after which we will disable this possibility.

Please note that it will still be possible to apply to Pharmacy and Physiotherapy until the end of August.

Application deadline for medicine has passed

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We have almost filled up all of our available spots in the medical programs for the Fall 2016 entry – both in the 6-year and the 4-year programs. This is why we have disabled the option to register new applicants.

It is still possible to apply for Dentistry (until Jul 28), Pharmacy and Physiotherapy (until Aug 31).”

Medicine admissions closing soon!

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We have almost filled up all of our available spots in the medical programs for the Fall 2016 entry – both in the 6-year and the 4-year programs. This is why we will only be accepting new on-line applications for these programs until midnight CEST on July 12, 2016, after which we will disable this possibility.

Please note that it will still be possible to apply to Dentistry, Pharmacy and Physiotherapy until the end of July.

Medicine admissions closing soon!

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We have almost filled up all of our available spots in the medical programs for the Fall 2016 entry – both in the 6-year and the 4-year programs. This is why we will only be accepting new on-line applications for these programs until midnight CEST on July 12, 2016, after which we will disable this possibility.

Please note that it will still be possible to apply to Dentistry, Pharmacy and Physiotherapy until the end of July.

Alumni Reunion in Taiwan!

Reunion Taipei

A cordial invitation for all PUMS alumni to a reunion that will take place in Taipei, Taiwan, on October 13, 2016. The event will be co-hosted with the Warsaw Trade Office in Taipei. So make sure to save the date and book your tickets – more details to follow!

Facebook group for incoming students 2016/2017

Dear Students,

If you would like to get in touch with other incoming students, you are welcome to join a student-administered Facebook group created for this purpose at https://www.facebook.com/groups/1594904944073883/

Regards,

Dean’s Office

Graduation ceremony – Class of 2016

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This year’s Graduation Ceremony for English Programs’ students was held on June 2nd. The Alumni, their families and close ones, as well as PUMS faculty and staff gathered at the Adam Mickiewicz University Hall to celebrate this special occasion.

Many respected guests honored the ceremony with their presence, including the Honorary Consul of Kingdom of Norway Jan Antoni Kubiak, PUMS Vice-President Prof. Grzegorz Oszkinis, Dean of Medical Faculty II Prof. Zbigniew Krasinski, Dean of Faculty of Health Sciences Prof. Wlodzimierz Samborski, as well as Vice-Deans of respective faculties and Associate Deans of the Center of Medical Education in English.
The commencement speech was delivered by an Alumna of PUMS, currently Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chicago State University College of Pharmacy, Prof. Anna Ratka.
Other addresses were made by Dr. Agnieszka Rogalska, a medical graduate of PUMS and Deputy Chief Medical Examiner at Dane County Medical Examiner’s Office in Madison, WI, USA, as well as prof. Beata Czarnecka, as a member of PUMS faculty.

Nearly 150 members of the graduating class from 20 different countries took part in the ceremony, representing future professionals of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and physiotherapy.

Outstanding graduates were awarded letters of congratulation from the President of the University in recognition of their academic and sports achievements, as well as community service.

For the first time in PUMS history, the event was broadcasted live on-line via the University YouTube channel. Photos from the event can be viewed here.

NEW academic calendar 2016/2017!

2016/2017 ACADEMIC CALENDAR for all English-based Programs at PUMS is available here

Poznań cultural offer for June 2016!

Check Poznań cultural offer for June 2016!

Concerts, spectacles, exhibitions, festivals, conventions, events and more: click here to open PDF file
Hope you’ll enjoy it!

Poznań City Hall

https://www.facebook.com/Poznan/

Graduation photo opportunity

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There will be a professional photo booth in the hall on the day of the graduation ceremony offering paid individual and group portraits. They will be available from 8:30 before the ceremony and then afterwards as well.
The final photos will be framed and decorated with PUMS logo.

NASG’s presentation re MCCEE on May 25th

Planning or thinking about taking the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE)? Then you should check out NASG’s presentation regarding the MCCEE! The presentation will discuss logistics as well as exam preparation. The event will be held at the library (seminar room C) this Wednesday, May 25th 7:00pm. Refreshments after 🙂 See you there!
MCCEE Event

Honorary Doctorate degree for Prof. Admir Hadžić

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We are pleased to invite you for the solemn celebration of conferring the degree of Doctor “Honoris Causa” to Professor Admir Hadžić, Consultant Department of Anaesthesiology at Oost Limburg Hospital in Genk (Belgium), for his great achievements in the development and the progress of regional anaesthesia.

The ceremony will be held on May 23rd (Monday) at 12:00 noon at Dzialynski Palace at 78/79 Old Market Square.

Guest lectures by prof. Jon DiGiovanni

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We have two guest lectures coming up by Prof. John DiGiovanni from University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy. Our guest is an expert in experimental oncology and cancer prevention. This Thursday, May 19 at 12 in room 1010 of Medical Biology Center (8 Rokietnicka St.), he will be speaking about:

1. Genetic Susceptibility to Environmentally Induced Cancer
2. Obesity, Energy Balance and Cancer: New opportunities for Cancer Prevention

NASG Superbowl tournament & BBQ on May 12

NASG is hosting it’s annual Superbowl tournament & BBQ on May 12. Spend your day off enjoying delicious burgers and cheering on your classmates in flag football! Starting at 12pm, on the field behind Karolek. Don’t forget to bring CASH for the purchase of food. See you there!

More at: https://www.facebook.com/events/1708739952745352/

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Lectures by Prof. Maria Siemionow

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SimOlympics2016 School finals winners

Congratulations to the winning team of the SimOlympics2016 PUMS finals:

Tomasz Dobiecki
Radosław Kadziszewski
Tomasz Kłosiewicz
Bartosz Michalski
Marta Niezgoda

They will be heading to Krakow to take part in the national finals where they could potentially qualify for the global finals in Lisbon.

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ANSA Medical Seminars

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Save the date! The Association of Norwegian Students Abroad extends an invitation to all interested students to a series of seminars with renowned medical experts:

– Prof. Roald Bahr, MD, PhD (Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, Oslo, Norway): “Acute ankle injuries and how to treat them”,
– Prof. Karim Khan, MD, PhD, FASCM (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada): “Active exercise as a treatment option for a variety of injuries”,
– Prof. Lasse A. Skoglund, DrSci, DiplSci. GenBiology, DiplSci. Sedation&PainControl, Cand.odont, FDS RCS (University of Oslo, Norway): “Effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on pain and swelling after dental surgery

More details can be found on the event’s page at https://www.facebook.com/events/991860427559187/.

SimOlympics2016 School final

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Eliminations for the SimOlympics1016 School final are complete and we’re happy to announce the top 3 teams that will compete in the final on Apr 21 at noon in Stomatologicum:

Team A
Dorothy Mitkowski
Ridha Ali
Paul Brodzik
Conrad Kozlowski

Team B
Rafał Mazurek
Maciej Kasprzyk
Aleksy Nowak
Michał Piaseczny
Waldemar Wyrzykiewicz

Team C
Radosław Kadziszewski
Tomasz Dobiecki
Marta Niezgoda
Tomasz Kłosiewicz
Bartosz Michalski

3rd Annual NASG Residency Match Event

PUMS North American Student Government is organizing its annual meeting with students who have successfully applied for residency in the US and Canada.

Come join the celebration and get some valuable first-hand tips!

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Live transmission of Graduation and White Coat ceremonies

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We are happy to anounce that this year’s Graduation and White Coat ceremonies for international students on June 2nd will be broadcasted live on-line for all the family members and close ones that won’t be able to make it all the way to Poznan to be there for you in person. Stay tuned for more details as we prepare the transmission!

SimOlympics 2016 – School finals

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School finals of the SimOlympics 2016 medical simulation tournament for student teams will take place on April 21 at 12 noon in Collegium Stomatologicum. We’re extending an open invitation for anyone who would like to join us and watch how the future doctors and nurses tackle the interactive assignments, showing their best medical knowledge and clinical skills.

The winning team of the local tournament will qualify for national finals that will be held in Krakow on May 6 this year, which in turn will qualify for the global finals in Lisbon.

The 3rd Global SimOlympics are organized by PUMS, Polish Society of Medical Simulation and the Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine (SESAM).

We’re coming to Vancouver!

For the first time we are holding our entrance examinations in Vancouver this year. Register for admissions and have your exam in Vancouver on May 8: https://applicant.ump.edu.pl!

We will also be taking part in International Universities Fair in Vancouver the day before – meet us there and ask away!

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Important Dates: Applicants and Freshmen 2016/2017

Final Application deadline: July 31, 2016.

Newly accepted students’ dormitory preferences must be submitted online by July 31, 2016 at the latest.

Information confirming dormitory assignments will be e-mailed to all students concerned no sooner than the first week of August 2016.

First part of the Pre-study course provided online, mandatory for the 6MD, DDS, PharmD and Physiotherapy Programs will be held on August 1-19, 2016.

Incoming students may start moving into the dormitories on August 19, 2016 at the earliest.

Orientation Days for students accepted to the first year for the academic year 2016/2017 will be held on August 24 (Wednesday) – August 28, 2016 (Sunday) at PUMS.

Second part of the Pre-study Course held at PUMS, mandatory for the 6MD, DDS, PharmD and Physiotherapy Programs will be held on August 29 – September 23, 2016.

First week of September 2016 – beginning of classes for the first year of the 4MD Program.

Last week of September 2016 – beginning of classes for the 6MD, DDS, PharmD and Physiotherapy Programs.

Socially Responsible University

We are proud to share that PUMS has been certified “Socially Responsible University” by the DKMS Stem Cell Donors Database Poland Foundation for our support for the “Say AAAaaa” campaign aiming to populate the Polish Stem Cell Donors list.

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Can’t go to Krakow for the McMaster International Review Course in Internal Medicine in May? Join us in Poznan for the official live event where we will be transmitting the whole conference.

MIRCIM 2016 is an accessible presentation of the most practical, up-to-date, evidence-based knowledge useful in everyday practice. The lectures will be delivered by an outstanding assembly of 30 speakers, who are world-renowned experts in their fields. Presented knowledge will be very useful for general internists, subspecialists, hospitalists, family physicians, residents and fellows in training specialising in internal medicine.

The event is free and the registration deadline is April 11!

Prof. Wysocki receives Hipokrates award

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Congratulations to Rector Jacek Wysocki for receiving the “Hipokrates” award from the Polish Society for Family Medicine! The award was presented during the Top Medical Trends Congress in Poznan.

Easter Break

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Wishing you a fantastic, relaxing Easter Break spent together with friends and family!

Due to holiday break, the Dean’s Office will be closed for students on Friday (Mar 25) and Monday (Mar 28).

Youth in the World of Science Conference

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The Youth in the World of Science Conference aims at bringing together academic students and high school youth in a professional conference event. It will take place on April 9, 2016 in the Library-Congress Center of PUMS. Detailed program is available at: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/program-konferencji-2016-ang/.

Prof. Witold Wozniak passed away

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We are deeply saddened by the passing of long-time anatomy lecturer, esteemed academic and a mentor to many generations of students, prof. Witold Wozniak.

A valued member of the University community, prof. Wozniak served as Dean of Medical Fauclty and Vice-Rector, as well as a member of the University Senate. He was a member of many Polish and international scientific societies, awarded for his scientific and education achievements by the School and by the Minister of Health.
And perhaps his teaching is what he will be remember for the most. It brought him sympathy and recognition by the students, both Polish and international, resulting in many student awards. He also received the international Innovative Excellence in Teaching, Learning and Technology Award, as well as the Polish Officer’s Cross and Knight’s Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta, the Medal of the National Commission of Education and the Ministry’s award for Exemplary Work in Health Service.

Our symapthies go to his family and close ones in this difficult time.

Funeral service will take place on March 18, 2016 at 1.50pm at Junikowo Cemetery.

NASG North American Electives Workshop

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NASG will be hosting its annual North American Electives Workshop on Friday, March 11th at 7:00pm. This event is aimed for those seeking North American residencies, especially for students in 2nd and 3rd years of 4MD, AND 4th and 5th years of 6MD, however all are welcome. Come learn from upperclassmen who have successfully completed electives in US or Canada and hear their experiences and advice. Topics such as logistics finances, applications, and Letters of Recommendation will also be briefly highlighted. After, come with your questions and mingle with upperclassmen over Pączki!

https://www.facebook.com/events/1137877286225426/

“You’re off to great places, today is your day! Your mountain is waiting, so…get on your way!” -Dr. Seuss

Best in Polish licensing exam LEK

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Congratulations to our medical students who did a very good job on this Spring session of the Polish medical licensing exam LEK – they achieved the highest score average out of all medical schools in Poland. Detailed report (in Polish) can be found here.

A call for help

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You might remember prof. Jacek Luczak, founder of the Palium Hospice in Poznan and professor at PUMS Department of Palliative Medicine – we’ve reported when he was awarded the European Citizen’s Prize by the European Parliament. His work towards the development of palliative care, his efforts to strengthen the cooperation of specialists in this field from various EU countries and building model doctor-patient relationships have been admirable. Even more so his work with the patients and as head of the first-in-Europe university Department of Palliative Care and of the hospice.

Now prof. Luczak has found himself asking for help. Because of the worsening condition of his son’s health – who is suffering from Lou Gehrig’s disease (SLA) – their family have started a crowdfunding campaign to fund a therapy with the use of embryonic stem cells in China.
The campaign went up on http://www.siepomaga.pl/wygram-z-sla on Feb 29th, and by the time we report on it Today, it just already reached its goal, collecting 120 thousand PLN in two days. And the donations are still coming! Now there’s one story of good deeds done to others and to the community coming back.

Help, if you can, or simply join us in supporting the Professor’s son to become the first human to overcome the disease. Michal Luczak has vowed to start a foundation to help other people suffering from SLA once he gets well. He also has to take his 4-year old daughter to a Metallica concert.

US and Canadian licensing and residency workshops

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We would like to invite all medical students interested in pursuing their professional careers in the US or Canada to attend a series of seminars, workshops and consultations covering the topic of licensing, clinical rotations and residency in these countries. The guest speaker will be dr. David Klein from Focus Education Center Canada. Detailed schedule is available at http://pums.ump.edu.pl/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Dr-Klein-PUMS-March-2016.pdf.

CS exam – RM & Dr Swartz webinar

A useful insight by Dr Mark H. Swartz for all those who have the USMLE Step 2 CS exam ahead of them. Courtesy of Residents Medical.

Dr Swartz is an internationally renowned teacher and author of medical textbooks, currently affiliated with SUNY Downstate College of Medicine and New York Medical College.

Click here to watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYaN93hskuU&feature=youtu.be

“Leczymy z misją” medical aid project

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An inspiring story of how individual impulse to help and a lot of determination can make a difference and improve the lives of many. A project started by three of PUMS students turned into an initiative bringing 4 ton and quarter of a million zloty worth of medical aid for the areas of Kenya that would not be able to afford it otherwise. Visit the Facebook page of Leczymy z Misją (“Treating with Mission”) to find out more.

“Useless equipment in Poland is invaluable in Kenya and helps to save lives of countless patients there.
This is the origin of the idea to contact all hospitals within our reach and collect their superfluous yet functional equipment and freight it by sea to the Dark Continent.

What have we done so far?
1 container
10 000 kilometers and over 4 tons of medical equipment
valued at 250 000 pln.
27 hospital beds
5 cardio monitors
3 EKG devices
1,5 tons of disinfection products
300 surgical instruments and countless number of indispensable supplies.

This is what the boys gathered last year!
All went straight to Kenya.

What do we plan for this year?
We want to send even more!

After last year’s excursion we’re smarter and know even better what is most needed in particular parts of the country and what could be of use to the doctors.

If there is anyone among you who has some used yet functional medical equipment at disposal please contact us.
We’ll be glad to take it, store it and send it with undefiable confidence that it’ll reach those in need.”

Debate on “How to internationalize Poznan?” on Feb 24th

Poznan University of Economics and Business invites all international students in Poznan to take part in a debate on “How to internationalize Poznan?”, including a presentation and discussion of international students’ ideas. The meeting will be held in English (participated by interpreters).

WHEN: 24 February 2016 (Wednesday)
1:30 – 2:30 pm

WHERE: ECES building, room 4.1
Poznań, 55 Towarowa Str.

More information at http://ue.poznan.pl/en/news,c16/news,c15/viii-days-of-pueb,a46143.html

Free Dental Check-Ups on Feb 27th

Dear Student,

When was the last time you visited the dentist for a check-up and cleaning? It is recommended to get a check-up and professional cleaning every 6 months to avoid cavities or root canal treatment.

We are offering FREE DENTAL CHECK-UPS and cleaning if needed, on February 27th at the university’s Dentistry building (Collegium Stomatologicum, at Bukowska 70) courtesy of the Dental Student Association, sponsored by Colgate.

If you are interested, please send an email to: dsa.info.pums@gmail.com, subject line: Dental Check-Up. Again, it will be completely free of charge! You will receive email confirmation with an appointment time as a reply.

Regards,

Dean’s Office

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SimOlympics 2016 are coming up!

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Don’t miss the March registration for the 2016 edition of SimOlympics! Below is the invitation from our Center for Medical Simulation:

“We would like to invite you to SimOlympics 2016 !!!

During this contest you will have a chance to compete in small groups (4-5 students, at least two of then should be students of medicine) against each other in challenging but very interesting simulated clinical scenarios.

The patient you will be responsible for managing is a new generation of human patient simulators, so you will be able to perform a full physical examination, take history as well as check yourself confidence in terms of some medical procedures.

Your patient will have physiological pupils, can sweat, cry, bleed, urinate and seize!

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Top prize will go to the team who makes it to the final round and achieves top scores.

You will be scored by a panel of judges on your knowledge, skills, communication and teamwork.

Winners from PUMS will participate in national SimOlympics, which will take a place in May in Cracow.

Winners of national SimOlympics will participate in international SimOlympics, which will take a place in June in Lisbon during SESAM conference.

Try yourself !!! It’s a great experience and big fun!!!

You can register from 1st March to 31th March 2016 in 4-5-person teams at simolympics@ump.edu.pl

Please remember that only first 9 teams will be accepted – registration will be on first come, first served basis !!!

PUMS elimination will take a place on: 08th, 13th and 15th April at 5.00-8.00 p.m. in Medical Simulation Centre, Coll.Stomatologicum.

PUMS finals will take a place on 21st April in Medical Simulation Centre, Coll. Stomatologicum.

We are waiting for your team !!!”

Invitation to study in Poland

PUMS has been featured in a video invitation to study in Poland, created by the Embassy of Poland in Ottawa. The clip includes interviews with two of our students and footage from the campus.

Innovative cardiac surgery

12376366_1032069980168746_2994362086707064724_n 12552957_1032069976835413_117787010804754989_nAnother innovative surgery was performed in PUMS Lord’s Transfiguration Hospital in January. Cardiac surgeons have applied a completely new kind of device for left atrial appendage closure – the Watchman FLX (Boston Scientific). The ingenious construction improves both the efficiency of the procedure, and the patient’s safety. It is also minimally invasive – the patient can be discharged on the next day. The surgery is intended for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and increased risk of stroke. According to dr. Marek Grygier, who performed the procedure, it is a great alternative to anticoagulant treatment.

As a national leader in treating structural defects of the heart, PUMS Hospital at Dluga Street is always aiming at the very best solutions and is keeping up with newest medical science that can guarantee that. The Watchman FLX has only been used in a few medical centers in the world so far.

Watch the instruction video explaining how the device works:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAJn6EcLKUM

Assoc. Prof. Leszczyńska-Rodziewicz passed away

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We are extremely saddened by the passing of Assoc. Prof. Anna Leszczyńska-Rodziewicz, adjunct instructor in PUMS Psychiatry Department, dedicated teacher and scientist. Our hearts go out to her family and loved ones.

Funeral service will take place on February 12 at 12:30 at Junikowo Cemetery.

Innovative elbow joint replacement surgery

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Innovative elbow joint replacement was performed in January at PUMS Orthopedic Hospital. The procedure was challenging because of patient’s allergy to nickel and other metals composing traditional prostheses, as well as her senior age. It required importing a special nickel-free endoprosthesis from the USA – it is made of titanium, and chrome alloys and only became available in Europe last year. It was used in Poland for the first time.

The surgery, performed by prof. Leszek Romanowski (Head of Traumatology, Orthopedics and Surgery of the Hand Department) and dr. Pawel Surdziel, went well and the patient will now be starting her rehabilitation. She came to Poznan after unsuccessfully looking for help in other medical centers. As a specialized hospital with expert doctors and loads of experience, PUMS Orthopedic Hospital often takes on difficult cases from all over Poland.

SPS Newborn Knitting Donations

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“This year the Student Pediatric Society was able to donate 236 hand-knit hats and 34 pairs of socks to the Perinatology and Gynecology Department at the OB-Gyn PUMS Clinical Hospital on Polna Street. Newborns need one more layer of clothing than adults as a general rule – the hats donated will help the littlest ones regulate their body temperature and every contribution is extra special. This project began last year and has expanded to include socks to donate to newborns – the international students have been knitting since the beginning of the year with hopes of expanding the project, continuing in future years.”

Thanks guys!

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Alumni spotlight: Sadhana Dharmapuri, M.D.

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Watch the interview with a graduate of our 4-year Medical Program, class of 2002, Dr. Sadhana Dharmapuri, M.D., and hear about her stay in Poznan, her expectations and experiences,  and how PUMS influenced her life and career.

Dr. Dharmapuri currently occupies the position of Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, USA. The video is available on our YouTube channel at https://youtu.be/Re8Wp5iBI5I?list=PLE-A6VY5Mkfdw-Aqdo-Mz4xrPZTIGyFId.

1st European Laryngological Live Surgery Broadcast

The recording from the 1st European Laryngological Live Surgery Broadcast is now available on-line at http://els.livesurgery.net/video.php.

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It includes surgeries from 8 different European departments presented by famous laryngologists-head neck specialists.

The event was organized by the European Laryngological Society, PUMS Department of Otolaryngology and Poznan Supercomputing and Networking Center.

Innovative technology for cardiology

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The world’s smallest artificial cardiac pacemaker was implanted in a patient at PUMS Lord’s Transfiguration Hospital last week.

The device is the size of a pill, but does the same job as regular-sized single-chamber pacemakers, which are 10 times bigger, making the surgery much less invasive – the patient may be concious throughout the procedure. The new device also lacks an electrode, which was the most vulnerable part of the traditional pacemakers.

Since the device is more expensive than single-chamber pacemakers, it will be used in cases where it’s indispensable.

NASG Step 1 Workshop on Jan 28th 7pm

NASG is presenting a USMLE Step 1 workshop on Thursday, January 28th, 7pm at the library. The presentation will encompass students discussing their experience studying and taking the USMLE Step 1. Pizza will be served after the presentation. 
 
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‘Transculture Medical Care in the Face of Birth and Death’ lecture on Feb 8th

Dear students,

The Student Research Group of Ethics and Bioethics at PUMS Department of Social Sciences is organizing lectures about transculture in medicine “Transcutural Medical Care in the Face of Birth and Death”. The project will be carried out in the academic year 2015/2016 and consists of the series of meetings on four cultures and religious communities: Islamic civilization, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Judaism and Romani culture.

Next lecture will be delivered on Monday February 8th, 2016 at 4:00pm in the Conference Center of Poznan University of Medical Sciences (Przybyszewskiego 37a).

The meeting will be dedicated to Jehovah’s Witnesses community. Organizers along with guests will answer some questions e.g.: How one should provide health care and support their patients from Jehovah’s Witnesses community? Are there any medical procedures unacceptable for these patients? Do birth and death in the community have any special customs?

During the event you will have a possibility to ask our guests your own questions. After the lecture we invite you to take part in the workshop about taking care of transcultural patient – Jehowah’s Witness.

The participation is free of charge. However, the registration is necessary and available at www.transkulturowosc.evenea.pl.

LECTURE FLYER: click here to open PDF file

PUMS student an Interstudent contender

Dear Students,

We are happy to say that one of our own – Pharmacy student: Mohamed Abouzid Mahmoud – has qualified for the Interstudent competition for best international student in Poland. The purpose of the contest is to promote students who are particularly active in academic and scientific life during their time spent in Polish universities.

You can show your support by casting your vote at http://studyinpoland.pl/interstudent/voting/main.php?language=en. The voting ends on midnight of January 14.

Best regards,
Dean’s Office 2016_01_08_03

Dr Czekajlo awarded by the Medical Society of Virginia

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We are proud to share the news that Dr. Michael Czekajlo, our 4MD graduate and former faculty member, has been honored with a Salute to Service Award by the Medical Society of Virginia!
Currently an assistant professor at Virginia Commonwealth University, Dr. Czekajlo was awarded for his service to the international community, i.e. establishing a CPR for Schools program in Poland, contributing to the rapid development of medical simulation in our country and training American military and first responders on critical care practice. During his time as a Fulbright scholar at PUMS he helped to create and develop our Medical Simulation Center, as well as student and faculty training programs. Congratulations!

Watch the interview with dr Czekajlo at https://youtu.be/jvtwW_08cYU.
Read the story at http://bit.ly/1n5zN2M.

PUMS student in the INTERSTUDENT 2015 contest!

We are pleased to announce that PUMS 6-year PharmD student Mohamed Abozaid has been selected for the final phase of the “best international student in Poland” INTERSTUDENT 2015 contest. Congratultions!

Merry Christmas!

DEAR STUDENTS,

In the Christmas and New Year’s week the Dean’s Office will be closed on the following days:
– December 22-25, 2015
– December 31, 2015
– January 1, 2016
– January 6, 2016

The authorities and the staff of the Center for Medical Education in English want to wish you a Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!PUMS_xmas 2014

DEAN’S OFFICE

Poznań Silent Night on Dec 17th

Dear students,

Along with Poznan City Council we invite you to create multilingual choir to sing together Christmas Carol “Silent Night” in as many languages as possible!

PLACE: OLD MARKET SQUARE (STARY RYNEK)
TIME: THURSDAY DEC 17th 6-7:30pm

Many languages, one carol, a common message of love and joy. Let’s meet, sing, spend time together and feel how multicultural and multinational Poznan is! Together we create one Poznan.

Best wishes
Dean’s office

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Lecture on ISLAMIC CULTURE on Dec 13

The Student Research Group of Ethics and Bioethics at PUMS Department of Social Sciences is organizing lectures about transculture in medicine “Transcutural Medical Care in the Face of Birth and Death”. The project will be carried out in the academic year 2015/2016 and consists of the series of meetings on four cultures and religious communities: Islamic civilization, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Judaism and Romani culture.

The organizers hope the lectures will start a discussion about identifying the needs of multicultural patients who stay in in the Polish healthcare institutions and give us all a chance to broaden our knowledge of discussed topics.

FIRST LECTURE “ISLAMIC CULTURE” (10 ZL) will be held on DECEMBER 13, 2015 (Start at 11 AM) in PUMS Library and Conference Center at 37a Przybyszewskiego Street

For more information, please visit website www.skneib.ump.edu.pl or send an email to transkulturowa.opieka.medyczna@gmail.com.

LECTURE FLYER: click here to open PDF file

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Clinical Bases and Physiotherapy in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Knowledge of issues in the field of gynaecology: conducting interview, gynaecological examination, basic disease entities in gynaecology.
  2. Physiological changes during pregnancy, the most common co-morbidities of pregnancy.
  3. Knowledge of issues related to obstetrics. Physiological and surgical childbirth. Physiology and pathology of childbirth – basic issues.

Practicals:

  1. Conducting an interview, examination.
  2. Keeping clinical documentation to the extent necessary in physiotherapeutical practice.
  3. Female genital prolapse and urinary incontinence – diagnosis, treatment.
  4. The proceedings after surgery, contraindications for surgery, postoperative complications – prevention and treatment.

Learning outcomes

  1. The student distinguishes and explains basic concepts related to the subject.
  2. The student distinguished and uses concepts related to diagnostics and treatment in obstetrics and gynaecology.
  3. The student has and uses elementary knowledge of physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology.
  4. The student suggests diagnostics and points to the symptoms of diseases in obstetrics and gynaecology.
  5. The student appropriately and skilfully argues the preparation of physiotherapy program of for the patient based on the conceptual apparatus.
  6. The student cooperates in an interdisciplinary team and works in collaboration with the doctor, midwife.
    The student understands the importance of discussion in the field of gynaecological and obstetric physiotherapy using proper argumentation.
  7. The student understands the needs reported by the patient and responds appropriately selecting a proper physiotherapy program.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Practical Training (2nd year)

Practical training during the academic year covers 200 hours, including:

  1. Kinesis therapy – 100 hours,
  2. Physical therapy – 100 hours.

Summer practical training covers 180 hours, including:

  1. Physical therapy practical training – 100 hours,
  2. Clinical practical training – 80 hours.

 

Curriculum content:

  1. Introducing students to the organization of a hospital or other healthcare facility in which students undergo the practical training (characteristics of the unit).
  2. Introducing students to the equipment; to performance of physical treatments (type of equipment, maintenance, certifications, etc.).
  3. Reading the documentation in the health care unit (card orders).
  4. Performing the exercises of kinesis therapy independently.
  5. Independent performance of physiotherapy, such as: : heat therapy, cold therapy, hydrotherapy and exercise in water, electrotherapy, magnetic therapy, phototherapy, laser therapy, ultrasounds, thermotherapy.
  6. Extending theoretical knowledge during the meetings with the person supervising the practical training and using the knowledge in practice.
  7. Introducing students to the unit in which they undergo the practical training, that is: the types of treatments performed, what kind of diseases the unit is treating, physiotherapy equipment etc.
  8. Introducing students to the profile of training place and the therapeutic regimen for dealing with the most common diseases in hospital. Assisting during work with patients in the above mentioned diseases.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student can read thedocumentationinthephysiotherapyfacility
  1. The student can perform kinesis therapy treatments and therapeutic massage under the control of the training supervisor.
  2. The student can perform physiotherapy, such as: : heat therapy, cold therapy, hydrotherapy and exercise in water, electrotherapy, magnetic therapy, phototherapy, laser therapy, ultrasounds, thermotherapy.

The student can work with patients in the most common diseases in hospital.

Occupational Therapy in Neurology

Curriculum content:

  1. Occupational therapy for patients with various neurological diseases: multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke.
  2. Practical training in the field of occupational therapy for adult patients with various neurological diseases: multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke, cerebral palsy.
  3. Orthopaedic aids in everyday usage for patients with neurological.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student knows the scope of occupational therapy for patients with neurological diseases: multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke, cerebral palsy
  2. The student can help to select appropriate orthopaedic aids in order to facilitate the daily functioning of patients with various diseases from a group of neurological disorders.

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Cell Biology and Biotechnology in Locomotor Disorders

Curriculum content:

  1. Structure of the genome and the flow of genetic information (replication, transcription, translation).
  2. Mutations. Methods of inheritance. Diagnosis mutations.
  3. Gene therapy and therapeutic approaches in selected disease entities.

Stem cells: characterization, source (cloning, IPS, cord blood).

  1. Recombinant proteins, growth factors, PRP in the treatment of organ motion.

Transgenic animals as models of diseases of the locomotor system and manufacture of recombinant proteins.

  1. The use of gene and cell therapy for the treatment of diseases of bone and cartilage.
  2. The use of gene and cell therapy for the treatment of diseases of muscle and nerve tissues.

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student can describe the structure of the genome and the flow of genetic information (replication, transcription, translation).
  2. The student can describe mutations. Methods of inheritance. Diagnosis mutations.
  3. The student can describe gene therapy and therapeutic approaches in selected disease entities. Stem cells: characterization, source (cloning, IPS, cord blood).
  4. The student can describe recombinant proteins, growth factors, PRP in the treatment of organ motion.
  5. The student can characterize transgenic animals as models of diseases of the locomotor system and manufacture of recombinant proteins.
  6. The student can characterize the use of gene and cell therapy for the treatment of diseases of bone and cartilage.
  7. The student can characterize the use of gene and cell therapy for the treatment of diseases of muscle and nerve tissues.

Assessment method: credit, test with a grade

Palpative Anatomy

Curriculum content:

  1. Functional anatomy.
  2. Palpative anatomy of the shoulder girdle.
  3. Palpative anatomy of the upper limb.
  4. Palpative anatomy of the pelvis.
  5. Palpative anatomy of the lower limb.
  6. Palpative anatomy of the spine.

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student can discuss the basic division in functional anatomy.
  2. The student can perform palpation of anatomical structures of the shoulder girdle, upper limb, pelvis, lower limb and spine.

 

Assessment method: credit

Sports Medicine

Curriculum content:

  1. Key information on the aims and objectives of sports medicine.
  2. Detailed discussion of rules of eligibility of people for practicing sports. Discussing main health contraindications for individual sports
  3. General principles for periodic health examinations for people practicing sports.
  4. Main principles of optimizing nutrition in athletic training.
  5. Control methods used in athletic training. Presentation of measurement tools enabling the control of athletic training.
  6. General rules for the fight against illicit substances supporting the body’s ability to exercise. Doping in sport.
  7. General principles for preventing injuries in sports.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student knows goals and tasks of sports medicine.
  2. The student knows the rules of eligibility of people for practicing sports.
  3. The student knows the methods for controlling athletic training and can independently use the knowledge in practice.
  4. The student knows basic information regarding most common injuries in sports and knows general principles for avoiding them.

Assessment method: credit

Clinical Biomechanics

Curriculum content:

  1. Biomechanics as the study of the structure of human movement: origins, divisions, interdisciplinarity.
  2. The structural parameters of the human movement. The functional parameters of muscle actons.
  3. General characteristics of test methods used in biomechanics.
  4. Mass/inertial parameters of the human body.
  5. Biomechanics of muscles: basic geometrical, static and dynamic characteristics of skeletal muscles.
  6. Biomechanical characteristic of the body posture.
  7. Biomechanical interpretation of the human motor coordination. Bernstein’s theory of movement behaviour.
  8. Biomechanics of locomotion. Kinematic and dynamic structure of walking.
  9. Measurement of characteristic somatic parameters for calculating: masses and radii of mass centres (based on regression equations) and static loads.
  10. Detailed description of the structural parameters of the upper limb, lower limb, the spine and chest with the calculation of their mobility calculation; characterization of the functional parameters of selected muscle actons.
  11. Determination of the position of the general centre of mass using the direct method: the du Bois-Reymond technique.
  12. Calculating the masses and radii of the centres of masses of human body segments based on specific regression equations.
  13. Calculation of static loads in the characteristic geometric positions of the body and limbs, derived from the maintenance of body segments.
  14. Biomechanics of muscles – characteristics of the force/torque dependency and the operating angle of the muscle.
  15. Biomechanics of muscles – description of the dependency between force and torque of a muscle and its length [F= f (L)]; muscle force and the time needed to generate it [F = f (t)]; muscle force/torque and the speed of its contraction [F = f (V)].
  16. Measurement of muscle forces and torques generated in statics and quasi-statics. Topography of torques of muscle forces and its importance in clinical biomechanics/physiotherapy.
  17. Measurement of torques of muscle forces generated by muscles of the torso.
  18. Body postures through studies of postural stability. Laboratory experiments.
  19. Biomechanics of walking – detailed kinematic characteristics of angular changes in the joints: the hip, knee and upper ankle in the walking cycle.
  20. Biomechanics of walking – detailed characteristics of the dynamic reaction of the ground in the walking cycle. Biomechanical interpretation of the walking with crutches. The context of dynamic loading/unloading. Laboratory experiments.
  21. Biomechanical interpretation of movement techniques. The context of compensatory mechanisms.

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student has basic knowledge of biomechanics and clinical biomechanics.
  2. The student has knowledge of basic research methods of biomechanics and their application.
  3. The student can interpret: body posture and the problem of postural stability, kinematic and dynamic structure of physiological and pathological walking, the characteristic limit values of the parameters of human walking.
  4. The student can take basic measurements of postural stability.
  5. The student can take basic measurements of forces and torques of chosen groups of muscles.
  6. The student can take basic measurements of ground reaction forces in walking/running type of movement.

Assessment method: exam

Physical Education in Water Pool

Curriculum content:

  1. Learning to swim with front crawl.
  2. A list of shaping exercises, strengthening upper and lower limbs and muscles of the spine. A list of the following exercises: buoyancy control, breathing exercises, coordination exercises and relaxation exercises. List of games and activities involving swimming.
  3. Exercises increasing the range of movement in joints. Exercises improving the silhouette and correcting posture. Jumping into the water, the elements of water rescuing. Exercises developing endurance.
  4. Learning the butterfly stroke.
  5. Learning the breaststroke.

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student has knowledge of the list of   exercises that increase the range of movement in joints and act on the spine.
  2. The student knows how tu apply shaping exercises in teaching various swimming techniques.
  3. The student has knowledge on how to master swimming techniques properly.
  4. The student knows how use relaxation exercises in the aquatic environment.
  5. The student knows how to apply standard and custom gear in teaching various styles of swimming and to make classes more attractive
  6. The student can use shaping exercises that increase the range of movements in joints and acting on the spine in the aquatic environment.
  7. The student can select the exercises that help mastering swimming techniques.
  8. Has mastered swimming styles.
  9. The student can carry out relaxation exercises in water.
  10. Makes physical activities in water more attractive by using standard and custom gear.

 

Assessment method: credit

Physical Culture in Rehabilitation

Curriculum content:

  1. Physical culture as one of the elements of rehabilitation.
  2. Mental training – principles and learning how to carry it out independently.
  3. Strength training, games compensating muscular disparities in people with muscle paralysis and paraplegia.
  4. Nordic Walking, strength training, games used in rehabilitation of upper and lower limbs.
  5. Exercise for the elderly, prevention, maintenance and restoration of correct body posture according to exercises by prof. Artur Dziak

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student has knowledge of physical culture regarding elimination of consequences of diseases caused by body dysfunctions.
  2. The student has knowledge of the fitness of the elderly and the basic resource of exercises to be used with this group of people.
  3. The student has knowledge of adapting physical activity to the needs and possibilities of persons threatened with damage to the musculoskeletal system
  4. The student has knowledge of various forms of movement and exercises for people with various disabilities.
  5. Has the ability to present and perform specialized forms of physical activity in order to eliminate the consequences of disease caused by a dysfunction of the body.
  6. Has the ability to perform exercises delaying the ageing process.
  7. Has the ability to adapt physical activity to the needs and abilities of people threatened with damage to the musculoskeletal system.
  8. Has the ability to carry out efficient and safe physical activities with persons with various impairments of the body.

 

Assessment method: credit

Psychology

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Basics of clinical and developmental psychology as a field of research and practice
  2. Human emotional functioning in the course of individual development and psychopathology
  3. Basic theoretical concepts of stress and coping with stress
  4. Psychosomatic and somatopsychic dependencies in human functioning.
  5. ICD10 and DSMIVTR diagnostic classifications and basic diagnostic criteria of selected disorders and factors influencing their incidence.
  6. The ability to recognize and analyse factors interfering with human development.
  7. Tasks implemented by clinical and development psychology: psychopathology, development, features and phases of development.

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. Uses knowledge of the models of clinical and developmental diagnosis in undertaking practical tasks, understands the specifics of clinical diagnosis and can determine the importance of a clinical problem with respect to the patient’s behaviour and the relationship with the patient.
  2. The student knows the basic assumptions of clinical and development psychology referring to the patomechanism of most common types of mental disorders.
  3. The student understand the relationship between emotional state and behaviour.
  4. Uses psychological knowledge reflexively in the perception of disorders, risk factors and resources and mechanisms in clinical and developmental psychology.
  5. The student knows the ICD10 and DSMIVTR diagnostic classifications and basic diagnostic criteria of selected disorders and factors influencing their incidence.
  6. The student knows psychosomatic and somatopsychic dependencies in human functioning.

Assessment method: exam

Pediatric Physiotherapy

Curriculum content:

  1. Characteristics of the infant psychomotor development.
  2. Characteristics of the psychomotor development in early childhood.
  3. Characteristics of reflexive reactions that occur during the pre and postnatal development of the child.
  4. Characteristics of the scale used to assess the psychomotor development of the child.
  5. Improving children’s skills using neurodevelopmental methods.

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student can characterize the psychomotor development of an infant.
  2. The student can characterize the psychomotor development in early childhood.
  3. The student can characterize reflexive reactions that occur during the pre and postnatal development of the child.
  4. The student can use the scale to assess the psychomotor development of the child.
  5. The student can perform basic treatments in the field of rehabilitation and according to the rules of neurodevelopment.

Assessment method: credit

Manual Therapy

Curriculum content:

  1. The theoretical basis of manual therapy.

– the place of manual therapy in the physiotherapeutic process.

– biomechanical and pathophysiological basis of manual therapy.

– rules for implementing the basic manual techniques: traction and sliding mobilizations.

– the basic methods of manual therapy – convergences and differences.

– indications and contraindications for the use of manual therapy.

  1. An analysis of simple and complex human movements in normal conditions and in conditions of various movement disorders.
  2. Methods of performing basic manual techniques: traction and sliding mobilizations – practical presentation of the manual-articular therapeutic techniques.
  3. Examples of the use of manual therapy techniques in patients with impaired organ system.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has knowledge of theoretical and practical bases of manual therapy.
  2. The student has knowledge of biomechanical analysis of simple and complex anatomic movements

in normal conditions and in conditions of various movement disorders.

  1. The student knows indications and contraindications for the use of manual therapy.
  2. The student can independently perform manual therapeutic techniques according to the methodology used in manual therapy.
  3. The student can independently perform a biomechanical analysis of the locomotor system. The student can independently select and apply therapeutic techniques, suitable for clinical and functional status of the patient.

 

Assessment method: exam

Practical Training (1st year)

Practical training during the academic year covers 120 hours, including:

  1. a) preclinical practical training – 80 hours,
  2. b) kinesis therapy practical training – 40 hours.

 

Summer practical training covers 180 hours, including practical training in:

  1. Kinesis therapy – 120 hours
  2. Physical therapy – 60 hours

 

Curriculum content:

  1. Introducing students to the work and the organization of the unit.
  2. Introducing students to the tasks and the work of a physiotherapist in the unit.
  3. Reading the documentation in the physiotherapy facility.
  4. Carrying out independently interviews with patients.
  5. Making the basic tests to assess the functional status of patients.
  6. Assisting in the execution of the basic exercises of kinesis therapy.
  7. Independent execution of kinesis therapy treatments and therapeutic massage under the control of the training supervisor.
  8. Assisting in the execution of procedures in the field of: heat therapy, cold therapy, hydrotherapy and exercise in water.
  9. Extending theoretical knowledge during the meetings with the person supervising the practical training and using the knowledge in practice.

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student can read thedocumentationinthephysiotherapyfacility
  1. The student can independently interview patient.
  2. The student can perform basic tests to assess the functional status of patients.
  3. The student can perform kinesis therapy treatments and therapeutic massage under the control of the training supervisor.

The student can perform heat therapy, cold therapy, hydrotherapy and exercise in water

Sensomotoric Integration

Curriculum content:

 

1 History of sensory integration.

2 Introduction to the theory of sensory integration.

3 Construction and operation of the sense organs.

4 Classification of diagnostic categories sensory processing disorders.

5 Sensory processing disorders – cases.

6 Getting the surgery sensory integration.

 

Learning outcomes:

The student:

1 explains the definition of sensory integration.

2 discusses the structure and functions of the sense organs.

3 explains the classification of disorders of sensory processes.

4 can describe the diagnostic tools sensory integration processes

5 can describe the basic equipping the office sensory integration.

6 assigns case descriptions to each diagnostic category.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Physical Training

Curriculum content:

  1. Nationwide test of physical fitness.
  2. Proper movement technique and proper breathing during exercise.
  3. The choice of exercises for overall physical strength training.
  4. The choice of exercises for overall physical endurance training.
  5. The choice of exercises and loads in the prevention of posture defects.
  6. The basics of basketball, volleyball and tennis.
  7. Becoming acquainted with the possibilities of using cardio equipment in the development of motor abilities. Learning how to monitor heart rate.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student can carry out a nationwide test of physical fitness.
  2. The student knows movement technique and is aware of the need for proper breathing during exercise.
  3. The student can plan a physical strength training.
  4. The student can plan a physical endurance training.
  5. The student can plan and carry out exercises for the prevention of posture defects.
  6. The student knows the basics of basketball, volleyball and tennis. The student knows the correct volleyball, basketball and tennis posture; ways to move around the court.
  7. The student knows the possibilities of using cardio equipment in the development of motor abilities. The student can monitor heart rate.

 

Assessment method: credit

Polish Language

Curriculum content:

  1. Treatment and rehabilitation of the musculoskeletal system.
  2. Treatment and rehabilitation of the cardiovascular system and blood circulation.
  3. Treatment and rehabilitation of the respiratory system.
  4. Treatment and rehabilitation of the nervous system.
  5. The organizational structure of health care and its employees.
  6. The equipment to be found in a physiotherapy office.

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of treatment and rehabilitation of the musculoskeletal system.
  2. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of treatment and rehabilitation of the cardiovascular system and blood circulation.
  3. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of treatment and rehabilitation of the respiratory system.
  4. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of treatment and rehabilitation of the nervous system.
  5. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of the organizational structure of health care and its employees.
  6. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of the equipment to be found in a physiotherapy office.

 

Assessment method: credit

Introduction to Physiotherapy

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Explaining the concept of rehabilitation and physiotherapy
  2. Discussion of chemical, physical and mechanical stimuli acting on the body during physical therapy.
  3. The effect of and indications and contraindications for balneology, massage, kinesiotherapy, therapy with heat and cold, magnetotherapy, phototherapy, hydrotherapy, therapy with laser and ultrasound.

 

Practicals:

  1. Assessing the range of motion of limbs using a goniometer.
  2. Assessment of the range of motion of the spine using a tape measure.
  3. Assessment of the muscle strength.
  4. Basic clinical tests
  5. Rehabilitation exercises and techniques – a clinical case.
  6. Synergy and kinematic chains – a clinical case.
  7. Discussion of dynamic and static muscle activity – a clinical case.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student can explain the concept of rehabilitation and physiotherapy.
  2. The student can discuss the chemical, physical and mechanical stimuli acting on the human body during physical therapy treatment.
  3. The student has knowledge of the effect of and indications and contraindications for balneology, massage, kinesiotherapy, therapy with heat and cold, magnetotherapy, phototherapy, hydrotherapy, therapy with laser and ultrasound.
  4. The student can assess the range of motion of limbs using a goniometer.
  5. The student can assess the range of motion of the spine using a tape measure.
  6. The student can assess muscle strength.
  7. The student knows basic clinical tests
  8. The student knows rehabilitation exercises and techniques.
  9. The student can discuss practical synergies and kinematic chains.
  10. The student can discuss muscle function.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

PUMS authorities finalists of the LUMEN University Award!

We are pleased to announce that the University President Prof. Jacek Wysocki and Vice-President Prof. Grzegorz Oszkinis are finalists of the LUMEN University Award in the infrastructure and internationalization categories respectively. This is a great success for students, faculty and staff! Congratulations!

Lumen_nagroda

 

 

LUMEN JWLUMEN GO

Practicing Medicine in Europe seminar on Dec 5th

The Medical Student Association will be hosting a seminar this Saturday, December 5th at 1:30pm on the topic of Practicing Medicine in Europe! We will be holding this seminar in the Library on the first floor in Rm 2.09! Come Join us!

https://www.facebook.com/events/623233834484529/

This seminar will consist of two parts:

  1. LEK exam and Staz: Students who want to have their MD degree recognized in Poland and throughout the European Union must write and pass this exam. This is important for students who are planning on practicing medicine in Sweden, Germany, Poland and many other countries. The pass rate for English Students is very low and we want to improve this! Not much information about this exam is available for English students, so come join us at this seminar to find out how to prepare for this exam! A recent graduate of PUMS has just passed this exam and she wants to share some tips on what helped her! ;)For more information on LEK
    http://pums.ump.edu.pl/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/LEK-LDEK-terms-of-perf.-staz_upd22Jan15.pdf
  2. Applying to Ireland and UK Residency: MSA in collaboration with Ireland British Student Group will be presenting on how to apply for residency. The key for being successful is starting early and being familliar with the process of application. Come hear from a 4/4MD student who has recently applied what the process is like!

    Returning to Ireland and Britain to practice medicine is the main focus of IBSG. Whether you are an Irish/British student or not, if you are planning to apply to either of these places it is important you join this group on facebook to stay up to date with all of their events!
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/632739493496280/

    Please join us for coffee and pastries after 🙂

    MSA_seminar_5Dec'15

“Residency Interview Tips, Questions, and Answers!” Webinar Now Available

Dear students,

ECFMG is pleased to announce that the “Residency Interview Tips, Questions, and Answers!” webinar is now available on the ECFMG ECHO site.

Helpful tips and insight into the U.S. residency interview process are available on the following page: http://www.ecfmg.org/echo/webinars-oct-2015.html

Best regards
Dean’s office

Honoris Causa Doctorate for prof. Michael P. Sherman

Sherman

Prof. Michael P. Sherman, M.D., F.A.A.P. has been awarded an honorary honoris causa doctorate degree by our University.

The esteemed recipient is a professor of Child Health at the University of Missouri, Columbia, and professor emeritus of pediatrics at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Sherman is a world-renowned expert in neonatology and newborn immunity with extensive scientific work. But he is also an exemplary teacher and mentor: he has greatly contributed to educating top neonatology specialists in Poland by mentoring Polish doctors, overseeing scholarships abroad, advising and sharing his expertise, which in effect has improved the level of newborn medical care in Poland.
He is currently involved in scientific cooperation with neonatology departments in Cracow, Warsaw and Poznan.
You can read more about his input into Polish neonatology at http://cmcf.org/about-us/board-of-trustees-and-directors/board-members/prof-michael-sherman-m-d/.

The official conferment of the award will take place on Nov 18, 2015 at 11.30am in the Senate Room of the Library-Congress Center.

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED ON NOV 11, 2015

Dear Students,

On November 11 we will be celebrating the Polish Independence Day and all offices will be closed.

The Dean’s Office will reopen on Thursday November 12, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

HOURS OFF for PUMS STUDENTS – MONDAY NOV 2, 2015 until 12pm

Dear Students,

This is to inform you that the Rector of the University has announced hours off on MONDAY NOVEMBER 2, 2015 until 12 pm. There will be no classes held during the mentioned hours off.

Best wishes,
The Dean’s Office

Innovative surgery – first superhip/superknee procedure in Poland

A team of doctors from PUMS Department of Child Orthopedics and Traumatology has performed a successful 6-hour “superhip/superknee” surgery on a young patient in the University’s Orthopedic-Rehabilitation Hospital.

This innovative procedure, performed for the first time in Poland, was developped by a Canadian orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Dror Paley (currently working in Florida), as a method to treat Congenital Femoral Deficiency. The idea is to reconstruct both: the hip and the knee joints during one surgery. It also involves osteotomy and rearrangement of the bones, as well as shortening and lenghtening of the muscles, and, finally, a follow-up surgery to lenghten the femur itself. The aim is to equal the lenghth of the lower limbs and, after rehabilitation, restore full mobility.

Our doctors: Milud Shadi, Pawel Koczewski and Michal Walczak, have learned the procedure under the supervision of its author in Florida. With next patients already queued for the procedure, the hospital department is planning to cooperate with dr. Paley to develop a specialized surgery unit in Poznan that could routinely perform such surgeries.

News report (in Polish).

12191674_998943560147636_408187529293322215_n

NASG NBME Workshop

“Thursday October 29th at 7:00pm, come on over to the library for our annual NBME workshop! Learn about what the NBME exams are all about and get invaluable information on how to ace those exams!”NBMEworkshop

Admissions open

Our on-line application module for the Fall 2016 entry is now open. you can access it at https://applicant.ump.edu.pl/create/assignment-request/.

 

TEXT(4)

PUMS at Polish Universities’ Fair across Canada and US

Meet us at the Fahrenheit Center Polish Universities Fair in US and Canada! We’re coming to Chicago, Toronto/Mississauga, New York and Clark on October 24 to 27.

Details: http://www.fahrenheitcenter.org/vi-polish-universities-fair-2015.html

fairs_can_us_nov'15

Inauguration Day Ceremony

_MG_8902On October 5th we have officially inaugurated the Academic Year 2015/2016 in the Adam Mickiewicz University Auditorium. Rector Jacek Wysocki and esteemed University Authorities have declared the 95th academic period open, welcomed over 1700 new students and presented honorary awards to members of the faculty.

View the full gallery of the event on our facebook page.

PUMS at the European Education Fair Taiwan

We will be available at the European Education Fair Taiwan. Come find us at the Warsaw Trade Office stand!

For more information visit: http://www.eef-taiwan.org.tw/.

2015

THE INAUGURATION DAY on OCTOBER 5, 2015

Dear students,

This is to remind you that the official opening of the new academic year (“inauguration“) will be held on October 5, 2015 at 11 a.m. in Collegium Minus (1, Wieniawskiego Street).

All students should wear formal clothes. The presence on this ceremony is obligatory for all first-year students.

Selected first-year students of the English Language Programs will be asked at the stage and officially admitted to the University. Afterwards, all students will take the student oath in front of the authorities of the Poznan University of Medical Sciences.

Please be reminded that there will be no classes on that day.

View the Inauguration 2014 gallery on our Fb page

Best wishes

Dean’s Office

Applications for Irish and British Student Union (IBSU) positions

Dear Students,

The newly set up student organization Irish and British Student Union (IBSU) is looking for new members for the 2015-2016 academic year.

>The Executive Board members:
Attention! candidates must be in their penultimate year of their studies
Vice-President
Treasurer
Secretary
Communications Officer

> delegates from each class:
2 representatives for the 1/4 MD program
2 representatives for the 2/4 MD program
2 representatives for the 3/4 MD program
2 representative for the 2/6 MD program
2 representative for the 3/6 MD program
2 representative for the 4/6 MD program
2 representative for the 5/6 MD program

The Irish and British Student Union (IBSU) is an organization for all English-based MD Programs which aim is to provide a platform on which information about the processes of applying to residency programmes in the UK and Ireland can be conveyed to members.

All applications must be submitted by October 9, 2015 to:  nanasackey@live.com

If you have any questions please feel free to email nanasackey@live.com

Best regards

Dean’s office

Applications for NASG positions!

Dear Students,
The North American Student Government (NASG) is looking for new members for the 2015-2016 school year! If interested, please read over the application on how to apply.
2 representatives for the 1/4 MD program
1 representative for the 1/6 MD program
1 representative for the 2/6 MD program
1 representative for the 4/6 MD program
1 representative for the 3/4 MD program
The North American Student Government is an organization working as the official voice for all medical students at Poznan University of Medical Sciences. We exist to empower the student body by providing necessary resources and information to students with the ultimate goal of achieving a residency position in the United States or Canada. NASG is a liaison between the students and the Dean’s Office; seeking to enhance their experience by supporting policies that promote students’ interests, needs, and overall well-being.
All applications must be submitted by October 1, 2015 to:  nasg.info.pums@gmail.com
If you have any questions please feel free to email  nasg.info.pums@gmail.com
NASG_appl_2015-16

New Payment ID System at PUMS

Dear students,

Please be informed that starting from the academic year 2015/2016 you are required to use a specific payment ID while making payments related to your studies at the University.
This requirement has been implemented to facilitate the process of proper registration of your payments in the University system as many students fail to wire their fees to the proper account number and include appropriate payment description in the memo.
A payment ID is available in your student profile with payment information in the Virtual Student Services System (WISUS). You can see the payment ID while choosing a specific charge for which you will be paying.
Please note that each student as well as each charge (e.g. tuition, dorm, ID card) has a different payment ID.
Failure to use the proper payment ID will result in covering the charges with the earliest payment deadline, not necessarily the one you intended to settle.
To obtain more information on new payment ID system please contact our Bursary Office at e-mail: bursary@ump.edu.pl or call at +48 61 854 72 21, +48 61 854 72 33.

Regards,
DEAN’S OFFICE

Student ID card as PEKA

Did you know that you can use your student ID card* for electronic bus/tram tickets and other functions of the PEKA city card? All you need to do is register your card on the official PEKA website. Then visit one of the City Transportation Authority’s (ZTM) customer service points to activate it:

indeks

*works only with cards issued in 2012 or later.

US/Canadian residencies map

Wondering about the possible US and Canadian residency destinations and specialties available after graduating from PUMS? Check out the map of sample residency placements of our alumni in North America in recent years:

Orientation Days for Freshmen

Orientation Days 2015_schedule+map-page-001Orientation is starting this week! We are happy to welcome all Freshmen to our School and to the lovely city that will become your home for the next couple of years! See you in Poznan!

PUMS volunteer expedition to Indonesia

11807799_144692825867148_595328074883687225_oA wonderful example of PUMS community joining hands for a cause: this voluntary team is currently in Indonesia providing free medical services to people from underdeveloped parts of Java, Bali and Papua. They are doing this in their own vacation time, using their own funds – which are also used to buy all the medical supplies – and working dawn till dusk with local patients. Apart from medical aid, they are also educating the local communities on proper teeth brushing, benefits of breastfeeding, etc.

The team includes:
-3 doctors from PUMS: dr. Izabela Chudzicka-Strugala (Microbiology Dept.), assoc. prof. Edyta Madry (Physiology Dept.) and assoc. prof. Radoslaw Madry (Oncology Dept.) – whom you may know as our teaching faculty,
-2 PUMS graduates: dr. Wang Jaw Shing and dr William Winardi,
-2 students of PUMS Polish medical program: Ida Madry and Michal Malesza,
-2 students of PUMS English-language medical programs: Tzu-Shing Kuan and Fecehauwe Mezque.
-prof. Aij-Lie Kwan – neurosurgeon from Kaohsiung Medical University (PUMS partner school from Taiwan) – who came up with the idea and organized this expedition.

You can follow their work at https://www.facebook.com/pages/PUMS-in-Indonesia-pomagamy-we-help/118895781780186.

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED ON AUGUST 17th, 2015

Dear Students,

As you may know AUGUST 15th is a national holiday in Poland.

Since this year August 15th falls on a Saturday, all University administration offices, including our office at Jackowskiego 41, will be closed on Monday August 17th, 2015.

 

We will reopen on Tuesday, AUGUST 18th, at 10:30am.

 

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

DEAN’S OFFICE OPEN at 1:30 pm until further notice

Dear students,

This is to inform you that the Dean’s Office will be open from 10:30 am until 1:30 pm UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE due to heat wave.

Best wishes,

DEAN’S OFFICE

Poznan – Ławica airport undergoing maintenance

Dear Students,

This is a friendly reminder that the airport in Poznan – Ławica – will be undergoing maintenance and modernization and will close all of its runways for the period between September 21 and October 11, 2015. This means that all traffic usually operated by Poznan airport will be re-routed to other cities within this period.

If you’re planning to travel to or from Poznan during this period, please plan your trip in advance and consult your airline to find out about alternative itineraries, inter-city train and bus connections and other details.

Sincerely,
Dean’s Office

spok-wakacji

NEW academic calendar 2015/2016!

2015/2016 ACADEMIC CALENDAR for all English-based Programs at PUMS is available here

Admissions period deadline for 6MD Program

Admissions period for the 6-year MD program has been concluded.

Admissions period deadline for 6MD Program

Admissions period for the 6-year MD program has been concluded.

IELTS required for UK Foundation Programme

Dear Students,

Those of you who are interested in applying for the UK Foundation Programme are required by the UK Foundation to submit a valid academic IELTS certificate with a score of 7.5 in each domain. Other qualifications are not accepted.

The IELTS certificate must be submitted at the time of application.

Regards,
Dean’s Office

WHITE COAT CEREMONY 2015

The second White Coat Ceremony at Poznan University of Medical Sciences took place on June 1st 2015 at the Adam Mickiewicz University Hall.

This occasion served as a warm welcome for students to the beginning of their professional university careers and clinical courses. The Deans and other university faculty & officials were present to congratulate the students as they wear their white coats on stage.

Prof. T. Allen Merritt, M.D., MHA, MPH, FAAP, from Loma Linda University School of Medicine a graduate of class 2015 Dr Natalia Hanson delivered speeches for nearly 190 first-year M.D. and D.D.S. students attending the White Coat Ceremony.

View the White Coat Ceremony 2015 photo gallery on our Fb page

_MG_6017#2

GRADUATION CEREMONY 2015

This year the Graduation Ceremony for English Programs’ students was held on June 1st. Graduating students, their families as well as PUMS Faculty and staff gathered at the Adam Mickiewicz University Hall to celebrate this special occasion.

Many respect guests honoured the Graduation Ceremony with their presence, including Vice-President Prof. Grzegorz Oszkinis, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of Medical Faculty I Prof. Ryszard Marciniak, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of Faculty of Pharmacy Prof. Lucjusz Zaprutko, M.Sc., Ph.D., Dean of Faculty of Health Sciences Prof. Włodzimierz Samborski, M.D., Ph.D., as well as Vice-Deans of respective faculties and Associate Deans of the Center of Medical Education in English. Speeches for the graduating class of 2015 were delivered by the President of the Polish-American Medical Society in Chicago: Kornelia Krol, M.D., FACOG, and a member of the teaching staff Andrzej Jawień, M.D.

Nearly 200 members of the graduating class of 2015 took part in the Graduation Ceremony on June 1st, including 48 students from the 4-year M.D. Program, 58 students from the 6-year M.D. Program, 38 students from the 5-year D.D.S. Program, 6 students from the Pharm.D. Program and 10 students from the 3-year B.Sc. Physiotherapy Program.

Outstanding graduates were awarded letters of congratulation from the President of the University in recognition of their academic and sports achievements, as well as community service.

View the Graduation Ceremony 2015 photo gallery on our Fb page

_MG_5978 (2)

JUNE 1 + JUNE 4-5, 2014 – DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED

Dear Students,

This is to inform you that the Dean’s Office will be CLOSED on JUNE 1, 2015 (Monday) due to the Graduation and White Coat Ceremonies. We will be open on Tuesday and Wednesday (JUNE 2 and JUNE 3).

Also, as you may know, Thursday, JUNE 4, 2015, is the Corpus Christi Day in Poland.

There will be no classes and all University offices will be closed on that day.

The Dean’s Office will be also closed on Friday, JUNE 5, 2015.

We will reopen on Monday, JUNE 8, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

DIRECTOR

Professor Grzegorz Oszkinis M.D., Ph.D. (more…)

THE VICE-DIRECTOR

of the Center for Medical Education in English

Prof. Katarzyna Ziemnicka, M.D., Ph.D.
(more…)

THE VICE-DEAN of Medical Faculty I

for English Program, Development of Teaching and International Relations

Prof. Grzegorz Dworacki, M.D., Ph.D.
(more…)

THE VICE-DEAN of Faculty of Health Sciences

for English Program and International Relations

Prof. Anna Jankowska, Ph.D.

(more…)

The Associate Dean for Advanced MD Program

Assoc. Prof. Jan Mazela, M.D., Ph.D.

(more…)

THE VICE-DEAN of Medical Faculty II

for English Programs

Assoc. Prof. Justyna Opydo-Szymaczek, D.D.S., Ph.D.

(more…)

THE VICE-DEAN of Faculty of Pharmacy

for English Program and International Relations

Prof. Franciszek Głó‚wka, M.Sc., Ph.D.
(more…)

EUROASMUS AND FRIENDS CUP 2015

Dear students

The fourth edition of international student football tournament EUROASMUS AND FRIENDS CUP will take place on May 30th.

TO SIGN UP go to: http://goo.gl/forms/6raVwg4igv
Deadline: May 25th, 2015 (23:59).

More information at: https://www.facebook.com/events/451081645055513/

Tournament will take place on May 30th at the stadium Przywodny Rataje Complex, os. Piastowskie 106A in Poznan:
– 10 teams will participate in the competition (first come first service rule).
– Participants of the tournament are international students (studying in Poznan), representatives of their home countries and/or their international teams, including team Poland.
– Teams represent exact countries (at least 4 players must be citizenships of that country).
– Only 1 team can represent exact country (first come first service rule).
– All the teams must register for the tournament via form: http://goo.gl/forms/6raVwg4igv by May 25th, 2015 (23:59).
– The teams consist of at least 6 players (max. 10), including a goalkeeper.
– Single player can represent only one team.

Check out how we played in 2012: https://goo.gl/YHcYbi 2013: https://goo.gl/4y1mWg and 2014 https://goo.gl/4p7QKs

Watch the video clips from EUROASMUS AND FRIENDS CUP 2012: https://goo.gl/A301y1 EUROASMUS AND FRIENDS CUP 2013: https://goo.gl/iFJrlK and EUROASMUS AND FRIENDS CUP 2014 https://goo.gl/Dai89R

Don’t forget to read: Terms and conditions: http://goo.gl/7aR8oF.

United we play, united we support, united we enjoy!

Hoping to see you on the pitch,

 

Academic Poznań crew
PUMS Dean’s office

Euroasmus 2015

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED MAY 1, 2015

Dear students,

This is to inform you that the Dean’s Office will be closed on May 1 (Friday) due to Labor Day (May Day).
There will be no classes on May 1 and all University offices will be closed on May 1 (Friday) and May 3 (Sunday) due to Labor Day (May Day) and Polish Constitution Day respectively.
PUMS Library will be closed on May 1-3.

We will reopen on Monday, May 4, at the regular hours.

Best wishes

DEAN’S OFFICE

RENOVATIONS IN KAROLEK DORMITORY DURING THE SUMMERTIME 2015

Dear Karolek residents,

This is to inform you that due to planned renovations Karolek residents can stay in the Karolek dormitory only until June 30th, 2015.

All Karolek residents are required to move out of Karolek by the June 30th deadline to allow for building wide renovations to take place. This also applies to all students currently residing in Karolek who are leaving for holidays as early as in April or May this year. They are requested to contact the head of PUMS dormitories Mr Miroslaw Jackowiak urgently at jackowiak@ump.edu.pl.

Please note that it will not be possible to leave your personal belongings in your room. Still, right now the School is preparing the storage area in the building located on the way from Karolek to Eskulap, where you will be able to leave your belongings for the summer time. More information will be available shortly.

Students in a need of accommodation during the summer time will be offered the possibility to stay in one of PUMS dormitories. These students are required to contact the head of PUMS dormitories Mr Miroslaw Jackowiak at jackowiak@ump.edu.pl by May 31, 2015 midnight CET.

We will do our best so you could move back to the room you used to live after the renovations are completed. But please be aware that it might not be possible and you might be offered another room for the new academic year.

Also please be aware that students currently living alone in double rooms (single occupancy of a double room) in Karolek will be assigned a roommate in the new academic year.

Regards

PUMS Dormitory Administration

Dean’s office

NASG MCCEE workshop on Apr 27

Please join us for NASG’s next workshop on MCCEE Prep! 
(Medical Council of Canada Evaluation Examination)
It will be Monday, April 27th from 7-9pm at the Library (in conference room 1.12)

NASG MCCEE workshop
 

CANCELLED LECTURE

We regret to inform you that the lecture of Prof Dr dent med Christian Hannig  for 24 April IS CANCELLED.

Dean’s office

APPLY NOW FOR RESIDENTIAL ADVISOR 2015-2016!

We are looking for qualified PUMS students to join our RA Team for the next academic year!

RAs:

  • help provide a safe and quiet environment within each dormitory
  • act as mentors and role models
  • form a sense of community

Please check your school e-mail account and the RA Facebook page for more information about the application process

More information at http://pums.ump.edu.pl/about/student-information/applications-for-ra-positions/

RA_poster

Cultural Adaptation Workshops for International Students Apr 27-28

Dear Students,

Do you want to learn techniques for coping with cultural differences? Come to our adaptation workshops, which are aimed at facilitating the process of integrating into a new cultural and social environment. We will also help you to take a look at the emotions and psychological processes that occur in a migration situation, as well as providing an introduction to Poles and Poland as a host country.

The Institute of Public Affairs invites foreign students to adaptation workshops, which will be held on 27-28th April 2015 in Warsaw.

The workshops will be held in the IPA’s office in Warsaw (Szpitalna St. 5/22) Reimbursement of travel expenses for people outside the Warsaw will be available.

Further information on the training can be found on the website http://www.isp.org.pl/site.php?id=932&conf=376&lang=2 and in the schedule
Interested persons should fill in an application
and send it in by 26 April 2015  to:dominika.potkanka@isp.org.pl

Space is limited.  The workshops will be held in Polish and will be translated into English. Participants will receive a certificate confirming attendance at workshops.

The participation in the workshops is free of charge.

Interested persons should send an email with this information to the following e-mail address: dominika.potkanska@isp.org.pl If you have any questions, please contact Dominika Potkańska, project coordinator from the Migration Policy Programme IPA. Tel: (22) 556 42 77 or e-mail: dominika.potkanska@isp.org.pl

Best regards and see you at the workshop!

Dominika Potkańska

Project coordinator/Analyst Migration Policy Programme
Institute of Public Affairs www.isp.org.pl

Cultural Adaptation Workshops

Lectures for DDS students on April 24th

Department of Biomaterials and Experimental Dentistry invites all students from 2nd to 5th years DDS to lecture of Prof Dr dent med Christian Hannig, director of Dental, Oral and Maxillofacial Centre, Operative Dentistry from Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus University in Dresden (Germany).

The lectures will be held on April 24th at 11.30 -13.00 at Collegium Stomatologicum, lecture room 202:

1. Characterisation and modulation of initial bioadhesion in the oral cavity

Abstract: Initial bioadhesion on the dental hard tissues (pellicle formation) is of essential relevance for physiology and pathophysiology at the tooth surface. The lecture will present information on formation, composition and function of the pellicle layer based on own studies. Furthermore, the efficacy of certain preparations used in dental prophylaxis will be evaluated with special focus on the interactions with the pellicle layer. This includes mouthrinses and tooth-pastes based on nanomaterials as well as natural materials.

2. Composite restorations in posterior teeth

Composites are a well-accepted material for restoration of class I and class II cavities. The lecture will present a clinical concept for successful placement of composite fillings in posterior teeth. Indications, contraindications as well as alternatives are discussed. Furthermore, recent clinical studies will be reviewed.

Free individual tutoring in Physics and Chemistry

Need to brush up on your chemistry or physics? We are offering free individual tutoring for PUMS students.
More information at: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/about/student-information/physics-and-chemistry-tutorials-for-english-speaking-students/

Global Spine Outreach in Poznan

Once again PUMS Orthopedic Hospital hosted a team of doctors from Global Spine Outreach – a nonprofit from Illinois gathering volunteer specialists in Orthopedics to provide complex spinal surgeries to patients with the most demanding spinal conditions.

The GSO team includes dr. Krzysztof Siemionow, a graduate of our 4MD Program (and son of the renowned prof. Maria Siemionow), currently the Chief of Spine Surgery and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics and Neurosurgery at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

Together with prof. Lawrence G. Lenke, a world-class expert in orthopedics (Chief of Spinal Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Missouri), they partnered with local doctors from PUMS hospital (prof. Tomasz Kotwicki, Chief of Department of Spinal Diseases) to operate patients with extreme spine deformities and great risk of damaging the spinal cord during surgery.

To learn more visit PUMS Fb page at https://www.facebook.com/PUMS.UMP

GSO_Poznan

SimOlympics coming up soon!

SimOlympics, the great competition in medical simulation, is coming up soon! We are looking for 3-5-person teams made up of students enrolled in final and pre-final years of medical studies at PUMS. Application deadline is April 15. Eliminations will take place on April 20 to 24 and the final on May 6.

The winning team will go to Lublin for a nationwide competition, where they will get a chance to qualify for the international stage in Belfast!

Team leaders, please register at simolympics@ump.edu.pl.

DSG_4847 ok

Happy Easter!

DEAR STUDENTS,

The authorities and the staff of the Center for Medical Education in English want to wish you a Happy Easter!

Please note that due to the holiday break the Dean’s Office will be closed on April 3 (Friday) – April 6 (Monday).

We will reopen on Tuesday, APRIL 7, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

pums_easter 2013

Beginning of DST

Dear Students,

This Sunday (March 29) marks the beginning of Daylight Saving Time in our time zone. Please remember to re-set your time-keeping devices by one hour forward (2am to 3am).

Regards,

Dean’s Office

lecture for foreigners at Poznan University of Economics

Dear Students,

We would like to inform you about an interesting event Poznański Festiwal Nauki i Sztuki -Poznań Science and Art Festival (http://festiwal.amu.edu.pl/ , https://www.facebook.com/PFNiS)

During the Festival at the University of Economics there will take place a lecture  by Katarzyna Andrzejczak Phd called: Democracy and economic development

Date of the lecture: 16th April 2015, 13.00 in CEUE (Auditorium A), ul. Towarowa 55

Subject of the lecture:

Why is democracy frequent among high level income countries and rare among the economically less advanced ones? Does it mean that adoption of democracy can bring welfare to the poor? What is the role of democracy in a modern state and which countries in the World really enjoy it? The experiences of transition economies such as Poland, and some other states in Africa and Asia will help to address these questions during the lecture.

You are all very welcome to join the lecture.

Kind regards

Poznań University of Economics

UK Foundation Program: English language proficiency

Dear Students,

We have been informed by the UK General Medical Council that in the application for for the UK Foundation Program any evidence an applicant submits about their English language proficiency will be considered on individual basis and assessed against GMC criteria. However, required scores in the IELTS test will always meet their requirements and it is likely to be the quickest and easiest way for most applicants to demonstrate that they have necessary English language skills for practicing in the UK. Therefore, students who are going to apply for the UK Foundation Program are advised to take the IELTS examination.

Regards,

Deans Office

NASG elective workshop on Mar 2

For students in 2nd and 3rd years of 4MD Program  & 4th and 5th years of 6MD Program seeking North American residencies:
-Come learn from upperclassmen who’ve successfully completed electives in US or Canada
-Learn how to plan early with logistics and money matters, applications, and Letters of Recommendation… 
-Ask your questions and mingle with upperclassmen afterwards over some refreshments
-Yes! There will be food! 🙂
WHEN: MARCH 2, 2015 at 7:30 pm
WHERE: seminar room 1.12 in the Library
NASG_elective_Mar2'15

PUMS students took lead in GHLO accepted elective applications

As an active member of the AAMC’s GHLO – Global Health Learning Opportunities, in 2014 PUMS has taken the lead in having the most accepted students for electives through the program and had more GHLO Alum than any other school.

PUMS students received spots for electives in the following institutions: Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of South Carolina School of Medicine and Boston University School of Medicine.

Find out more about GHLO, its global network and the clinical opportunities it offers at https://www.aamc.org/services/ghlo/

GHLObanner icon.

Facebook group for incoming students 2015/2016

Dear Students,

If you would like to get in touch with other incoming students, you are welcome to join a student-administered Facebook group created for this purpose at https://www.facebook.com/groups/1594904944073883/

Regards,

Dean’s Office

Cooperation with L’Université Internationale d’Agadir

On January 27, 2015 in the main University building at 10 Fredry St. in Poznań the authorities of Poznan University of Medical Sciences (PUMS) and L’Université Internationale d’Agadir with its seat in Agadir, Maroko, signed an agreement with regard to the exchange of researchers, staff and students, and in particular in the preparation of Agadir Universiapolis candidates for studies at the Faculty of Pharmacy at PUMS.

PUMS_Adagir

 

Guest lectures on February 2 – Steven M. Donn MD, FAAP, University of Michigan

Dear students,

We are pleased to invite you to the lectures delivered by Steven M. Donn MD, FAAP.

Steven M. Donn MD,FAAP is an esteemed professor of Pediatrics at the University of Michigan Health Center, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. Click here to learn more

Open lectures:

“Patient safety and risk management – is it something for student to be worried?”

“Ventilating lungs – is it problem only for respiratory therapist?”

Date: February 2 (Monday) 5:00 pm

Place: Lecture room # 202, Coll. Stomatologicum, 70 Bukowska Street.

Steven M Donn MD

 

We hope to see you there,
Dean’s office

 

Cooperation with Ariel University

In December 2014 Poznan University of Medical Sciences (PUMS) and Ariel University with seat in Ariel, Israel, signed an agreement with regard to admission of Ariel University graduates of biological chemistry to the professional part of the 6-year Pharm. D. (Doctor of Pharmacy) Program at PUMS.

Univ_Ariel_logo

Prof. Vincent’s workshops on Jan 16, 2015 CANCELED

Dear students,

This is to inform you with regret that due to a sudden health problem of the
key speaker, Prof. Richard Vincent, the workshop ” Healthcare teams-a growing
success”.” planned for January 16 th,2015
has to be canceled. We will inform you immediately when the new dates of
the workshop will be set. We are convinced that this unexpected delay will
not cause any changes in our project which will be successfully continued in
the nearest future. We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this
change.

Sincerely,
M Witt MD,PhD

Conference-Workshop ‘Healthcare teams – a growing success’ on Jan 16

“It’s more and more clear that the TEAM causes the largest change in outcomes for patients”
John Jelovsek MD, Director of Simulation Teaching, Cleveland Clinic, Ohio

Dear STUDENTS and DOCTORS,

you have an exceptional chance to gain valuable knowledge and experience
in field of
TEAMWORK !!!

Poznan University of Medical Sciences

invites you to Conference-Workshop:

‘Healthcare teams – a growing success

on Friday 16th January, 2015 at 5 p.m. room.202

in PUMS Dental School building, 70 Bukowska street

This conference will explore the widely-published benefits of good team working and examine
how healthcare teams and their leaders can work together for best patient outcomes.

The main speaker and the chairman will be PUMS Visiting Professor: Prof Richard Vincent, Senior Consultant Cardiologist; Formerly Co-founder and Associate Dean Brighton and Sussex Medical School; Founding Head, Institute of Postgraduate Medicine Brighton and Sussex Medical School; Chair of Executive Committee, PRIME Partnerships in International Medical Education

Co-chaired by:
Dr Aleksandra Bojarska, Consultant Anaesthetists, University Hospital of South Manchester
Dr Magdalena Witt, Head of the Department of Rescue and Disaster Medicine, PUMS

Organizers:
Department of Rescue and Disaster Medicine, PUMS
Center for Medical Education in English, PUMS

Certificates of attendance will be provided.

Registration via e-mail address ekaniewska@ump.edu.pl  till January, 12th

Christmas and New Year’s week in the Dean’s office

DEAR STUDENTS,

In the Christmas and New Year’s week the Dean’s Office will be closed on the following days:

– December 16, 2014
– December 24-26, 2014
– December 31, 2014
– January 1-2, 2015
– January 6, 2015

The authorities and the staff of the Center for Medical Education in English want to wish you a Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

DEAN’S OFFICE

PUMS_xmas 2014

Workshops on intercultural education for students

The main focus of the workshops is to provide future teachers and youth workers with basic knowledge and skills of Intercultural Education and Non-Formal Education. The minimum number of participants to open the group is 20 (foreign and Polish students).

Language of the course: all activities will be held in English (or Polish if participants will be able to work in this language).

Program of the course: 19-20th of December 2014, from 9.00 to 15.00:

– Intercultural Learning – what is that?

– What is culture and cultural dimensions?

– How to manage a cultural shock?

– What are stereotypes?

– What is the intercultural competence? How can we develop it and what for?

– What is the teacher’s role in the intercultural learning?

Where?

The Faculty of Educational Studies / Adam Mickiewicz University

ul. Międzychodzka 5 (Information about the number of lecture hall will be sent on the 17th of December 2014.)

IMPORTANT! Please, confirm your presence until 17th of December 2014 on: knem@amu.edu.pl.

More information: http://knem.amu.edu.pl.

MANAGER

Ms. Magdalena Sikorska, M.A. (more…)

Head of MD Division

Ms. Katarzyna Żukowska, M.A.

(more…)

Admissions & Promotion Unit

Mr. Grzegorz Chewusz
(more…)

3-YEAR B.SC. PHYSIOTHERAPY PROGRAM

Ms. Weronika Maćków, M.A.

(more…)

BURSARY OFFICE (4MD, 5DDS)

Ms. Karolina Rogalska, M.Sc.

(more…)

NASG 2nd ANNUAL STEP 1 EVENT on Dec 11, 2014

11 DEC 18:00 at LIBRARY

– Presentations by students who passed the Step will focus on how to study, what to expect, testing center basic info, how to sign up as an IMG, and more!
– Meet and talk to presenters afterwards with pizza! Ask all the questions you want!

Step Event 2014

Prof. Herzig’s lectures on Dec 11 + 12

Prof. Karl-Heinz Herzig, MD, PhD, an outstanding researcher from the Finnish University of Oulu will visit our School next week. As a physiology professor, he is focusing his scientific interests on GI topics. In the coming days prof. Herzig will speak about:

1. Open lecture: Vitamin D – an essential hormone beyond bone health

Date & time: December 11, 2014 (Thursday) 1:30-2:30 PM

2. Lecture for students: Physical activity – the unused potential in health promotion

Date & time: December 12, 2014 (Friday) 10:00-11:00 AM

Both lectures will be held in lecture room SK5 of Karol Jonscher’s Clinical Hospital at 27/33 Szpitalna St.

 

Doctor Wanda Błeńska dies in Poznan

It is with deepest sadness and regret that we inform of the recent passing of an inspiring personality, devoted missionary and talented physician, dr. Wanda Błeńska.

Dr. Błeńska graduated from PUMS in 1934 and completed tropical medicine courses in Liverpool and Hamburg. As a student, she was an active member of the Academic Missionary Society. After taking part in the world war II as a soldier of the Polish resistance, she left for Uganda, Africa, to treat patients with leprosy.
Thanks to her hard work and commitment, she turned a small medical outpost in the town of Buluba into a modern and world-renowned specialized research, healing and teaching center with a network of stations in the country. The center is now named after her. Thanks to these stations medical care and sanitary education became publicly available for the sick of Uganda.
Dr. Błeńska has had a great influence on development of modern methods of treating the Hansen’s disease. Thanks to her thousands of people were cured and, in admiration of her caring attitude and lifelong devotion, the local community called her the “mother of lepers”.
For her outstanding work, she has been awarded honorary doctorate degree of Poznan University of Medical Sciences, as well as the highest national distinctions in Poland. She also held an honorary citizenship of Poznan and Uganda and the Pope’s Order of St. Sylvester.

Dr. Błeńska passed away on November 27, 2014 at the age of 103.

http://www.thenews.pl/1/9/Artykul/188664,‘Mother-of-Lepers’-Wanda-Blenska-dies-in-Poznan

DrWBlenska

THANKSGIVING PARTY 2014

Annual Thanksgiving Day Party organized by Poznan University of Medical Sciences for English Programs’ students.

The plan for the evening includes:
-award ceremony for students with outstanding academic and sports achievements,
-thanksgiving dinner,
-DJ and dancing.

All students from the English language programs are welcome to attend. The dress code is formal.

Please remember to bring your tickets and your ID cards with you and present them at the entrance.
Tickets will be distributed by the Dean’s office with the help of class representatives.

View the Thanksgiving Party 2013 photo gallery on our Fb page

NOTE: the Dean’s office will be CLOSED on Thursday, November 27, 2014 at 2 pm due to Thanksgiving Party.

We hope to see you there!

DEAN’S OFFICE

Thanksgiving

Educational, professional and scientific opportunities for medical career in Europe and USA conference on Dec 5th, 2014

The PUMS Department of Orthopaedics, Orthopaedic Oncology and Traumatology invites students to the conference and workshop Educational, professional and scientific opportunities for medical career in Europe and USA which will be held on December 5th, 2014 in Poznań.
The main purpose of this meeting is to provide medical students an opportunity to acquire updated information of the current international medical practice status and make future plans before graduation.
This meeting will take place at the School of Humanities and Journalism in Poznań.
Conf_Educ-Prof-Scient-Opportunities for medical career in Eur-US

NAC-OSCE exam SESSION: A guide by Dr. Young Soo Rho

Dear students,

We are pleased to invite you to NAC-OSCE exam SESSION that will be delivered by Young Soo Rho, MD, who graduated from the 6-year M.D. English language program in 2012:

WHEN: FRIDAY, November 14, 2014, 5.30-7.30pm
WHERE: room 202 in Coll. Stomatologicum at 70 Bukowska St.

We hope to see you there!

Dean’s office

Important Dates: Applicants and Freshmen 2015/2016

Final Application deadline: July 31, 2015.

Newly accepted students’ dormitory preferences must be submitted online by July 31, 2015 at the latest.

Information confirming dormitory assignments will be e-mailed to all students concerned no sooner than the first week of August 2015.

First part of the Pre-study course provided online, mandatory for the 6MD, DDS, PharmD and Physiotherapy Programs will be held on August 3-21, 2015.

Incoming students may start moving into the dormitories on August 21, 2015 at the earliest.

Orientation Days for students accepted to the first year for the academic year 2015/2016 will be held on August 26 (Wednesday) – August 30, 2015 (Sunday) at PUMS.

Second part of the Pre-study Course held at PUMS, mandatory for the 6MD, DDS, PharmD and Physiotherapy Programs will be held on August 31 – September 25, 2015.

First week of September 2015 – beginning of classes for the first year of the 4MD Program.

Last week of September 2015/ first week of October 2015 – beginning of classes for the 6MD, DDS, PharmD and Physiotherapy Programs.

Admission and application deadlines 2015/2016!

Admission period for all English-based Programs at PUMS for the academic year 2015/2016 ends on August 31, 2015. Application deadline: JULY 31, 2015.

E-index at PUMS from 2014/2015 academic year!

Dear students,

This is to inform that starting from the academic year 2014/2015 the University is introducing E-index which means that it will no longer use the paper index and examination card system.

Starting from the academic year 2014/2015 PUMS students are no longer required to collect stamps and signatures of course coordinators in paper indexes and in paper examination cards and submit those documents at the Dean’s Office by the required deadline (concerns the classes starting in the academic year 2014/2015 and later).

In case of classes taken by students prior to the start of the academic year 2014/2015 students are required to submit paper indexes and paper examination cards with required stamps and signatures of course coordinators at the Dean’s Office by the deadline in order to progress into the next academic year.

DEAN’S OFFICE

THE DEAN’S OFFICE WILL BE CLOSED ON NOVEMBER 10 & 11, 2014

Dear Students,

On November 11 we will be celebrating the Polish Independence Day and all offices will be closed.

All University administration offices will be also closed on Monday November 10, 2014.

The Dean’s Office will reopen on Wednesday November 12, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,
The Dean’s Office

 

INTERSTUDENT 2014 contest

Who is the best international student in Poland?

There are more and more international students choosing Poland as their education destination – currently the group constitutes over 36 thousand students. They became an integral, yet not always appreciated part of Polish academic environment. The INTERSTUDENT competition is a first initiative of this kind in Poland, fully concentrating on the international student community.

The competition is aimed at the international students studying at Polish Higher Education Institutions on the Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral levels. Both foreign students and students with dual citizenship ale eligible to apply. Students should be able to prove their activity at the cultural, social, ecological or sport levels. They should be able to demonstrate behaviors promoting the ideas of multiculturalism maintain good academic achievements and inspire others with their input in the shape of the local community.

We cordially invite you to fill in and send applications nominating students who stand out as active participants in the multicultural student community.

Contest Questionnaire is available on the following link: http://www.studyinpoland.pl/interstudent/images/ankieta_interstudent_2014.pdf

Application deadline: November 30, 2014.

The results of the INTERSTUDENT 2014 contest will be announced in Lublin on January 22, 2014 during the conference “Foreign students in Poland 2015”.

Contact person:
Magdalena Chróstna
e-mail: m.chrostna@perspektywy.pl
tel. 22 628 58 62 ex. 31, fax 22 629 16 17

More information: http://www.studyinpoland.pl/interstudent/en/

PLEASE NOTE: All students of MD, DDS and Pharmacy Programs in English at our University are Master’s degree students, and Physiotherapy – Bachelor’s degree students.

DEAN’S OFFICE

PUMS at Polish Universities’ Fair across Canada and US

Want to find out more about PUMS? Visit the V Polish Universities Fair organized by the Fahrenheit Center for Study Abroad. The event will give you an opportunity to meet with PUMS representatives and find out in detail about our educational offer.

The fair will be held in Chicago, Toronto / Mississauga, New York, Jersey City between November 15, 2014 – November 18, 2014:

November 15, 2014 (Saturday) – Niles, IL. – North Chicago
1:00 pm – 4:30 pm – White Eagle Banquets Halls
6839 N. Milwaukee Ave, Niles, IL 60714

November 16, 2014 (Sunday) – Toronto / Mississauga, ON
1:30 pm – 4:30 pm – Burnhamthorpe Branch Library
3650 Dixie Rd, Mississauga, ON L4Y – 3V9

November 17, 2014 (Monday) – New York, NY
6:00 pm – 9:00 pm – PSFCU (Polish and Slavic Federal Credit Union)
100 McGuinness Blvd, Brooklyn, NY, 11222

November 18, 2014 (Tuesday) – New Jersey
5:30 pm – 8:00 pm – PCF (Polish Cultural Foundation)
177 Broadway, Clark, NJ 07066

Click here to learn more: http://www.fahrenheitcenter.org/v-polish-universities-fair-2014.html

University Fair_Fahrenheit_Nov'2014

 

HOURS OFF for PUMS STUDENTS – FRIDAY OCTOBER 31, 2014

Dear Students,

This is to inform you that the Rector of the University announced hours off on FRIDAY OCTOBER 31, 2014 from 2 pm. There will be no classes held during the mentioned hours off.

Best wishes

The Dean’s Office

END OF THE DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME AT 2 A.M. ON SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2014

Dear Students,

Please remember to move back by one hour all of your timekeeping devices on this Sunday, October 26, 2014.

Have a good weekend,

The Dean’s Office

Guest lecture on Oct 31 – Prof. Heiner BOEING

Dear students

Please be informed that Prof. Heiner BOEING, an esteemed professor of nutritional epidemiology at the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Potsdam, will be giving a guest lecture for PUMS students and Faculty:

Open lecture: Implementing and running large cohort studies: EPIC and the German National Cohort as examples?

Date: OCTOBER 31 (Friday) 10:00-11:00 AM

Place: Lecture room SK5, Clinical Hospital No. 5 at 27/33 Szpitalna Str.

Best wishes
The Dean’s office

Prof. Heiner BOEING

Halloween Party on Oct 25th

EPSU would like to invite all students to their annual Halloween Party on Saturday, October 25th at Klub Eskulap!

EPSU Halloween Party 2014_web

Information seminar on practicing medicine in Canada on Oct 18

Coming up this weekend: a seminar through Skype for Canadian MD students with Dr. Shannon Trainor – graduate of University College Dublin (MD), who completed her residency in family medicine at the University of Manitoba (Canada). She is currently a practicing family physician and will be outlining the daily routine of a family physician, common procedures, sub disciplines, and the process of certification.
There will be a question period at the end.

Time: Saturday October 18th from 5:30 pm
Place: lecture room 2.09 in the Library

Best wishes
Dean’s office

 

NBME Prep Workshop

WEDNESDAY OCT 15, 2014
– We’ll cover Basic Sciences
– Anat, Histo, Micro, Biochem, Physio, Pharm, Patho, Beh Sci
– we invite upperclassmen to come and give advice!
– how to prepare
– good resources
– how to plan for success or just a pass

NBME Prep Pizza

Prof. KOLETZKO’s lectures on October 16

Dear students

Please be informed that Prof. Berthold KOLETZKO will be giving guest lectures:

1. Lecture for students: Complementary feeding and child health

Date: OCTOBER 16 (Thursday) 10:00-11:00 AM
Place: Lecture room, Clinical Hospital No. 5 at 27/33 Szpitalna Str.

2. Open lecture: Polyunsaturated fatty acids and health outcomes: diet or genes?

Date: OCTOBER 16 (Thursday) 1:30-2:30 PM
Place: Lecture room, Clinical Hospital No. 5 at 27/33 Szpitalna Str.

You are most welcome to come.

Best wishes

The Dean’s office

 

JOIN INTERCULTURAL WORKSHOPS FOR STUDENTS!

The Institute of Public Affairs invites students from across Poland to intercultural workshops, which will take place on 16-17 October 2014 at the WCIES (Stara St. 4) in Warsaw.

Do you want to find out about your own intercultural sensitivity and competence, and identify barriers impeding contact at the crossroads of cultures? Workshops on intercultural skills will help you to familiarize yourself with values and norms that are typical for various cultures, and also – on the basis of theories learned during the workshop – develop the ability to interpret them.

During workshops participants will:
• Acquire the ability to understand the values and norms that are typical for various cultures
• Learn how to identify barriers to communication at the crossroads of cultures – i.e., ethnocentrism, stereotypes, prejudices, and discrimination
• Understand how communication filters operate and their influence on the process of exchange of information between members of different cultures
• Learn how language influences the transmitted message
• Open up to cultural differences
• Find out about their own level of intercultural sensitivity and competence
• Identify their own barriers that make contact more difficult at the crossroads of cultures

Workshops will be conducted in English.

Participants will receive a certificate confirming attendance at workshops.

Reimbursement of travel and accommodation costs will be provided for persons outside Warsaw.

Further information on the training course can be found in the schedule.

We only accept applications from persons who declare that they are willing and able to participate in the entire 2-day training course.

The workshops are aimed at students from countries outside the European Union.

Interested persons should send an application by 13 October 2014 to the following e-mail address: dominika.potkanska@isp.org.pl.

Space is limited.

If you have any questions, please contact Dominika Potkańska, project coordinator for the Migration Policy Programme IPA.

Tel: (22) 556 42 77 or e-mail: dominika.potkanska@isp.org.pl

Intercultural Workshops

 

THE INAUGURATION DAY on OCTOBER 3, 2014

Tthe official opening of the new academic year (“inauguration“) was be held on October 3, 2014 at 11 a.m. in Collegium Minus (1, Wieniawskiego Street).

Selected first-year students of the English Language Programs were asked at the stage and officially admitted to the University. After that all students took the student oath in front of the autorities of the Poznan University of Medical Sciences.

_MG_1403

 

 

Lectures by Professor Timothy S. Tracy, Dean of College of Pharmacy University of Kentucky

Dear students,

Dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy of Poznan University of Medical Sciences
and
Chair and Department of Physical Pharmacy and Pharmacokinetics of Poznan University of Medical Sciences

invite employees, PhD students, students to the lectures given by

Professor Timothy S. Tracy, PhD, RPh, Dean of College of Pharmacy University of Kentucky

“How Teams Can Better Serve the Needs of Patients”

on October 1st 2014 at 10 A.M.

and

“Pharmacy Education in the United States”

on October 2nd 2014 at 10 A.M.

The lectures will be held at the Congress Center of Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Lecture Room 1.12.

Best wishes

Dean’s office

How Teams Can Better Serve the Needs of anglo

Migrant Point information session on Sept 24

Dear Students,

Migrant Info Point is an initiative carried out by the Centre for Migration Studies at Adam Mickiewicz Uiversity in Poznan under the AMIGA project “Active immigrants on the local job market”.

An information session for PUMS students will be held on WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 24th at 5:00 pm in room 202 in Collegium Stomatologicum (Dentistry Building) at 70 Bukowska Str.

Migrant Info Point (MIP) office:
Collegium Chemicum at 6 Grunwaldzka Str.
2nd floorm, room 253

MIP working hours:
Tuesdays: 2pm-8pm
Thursdays: 9am-3pm

They offer information concerning:
> the legalization of stay (e.g. temporary and permanent stay permits), citizenship, obligation to report the place of residence,
> job market (work permits, starting a business),
> help with completing official forms,
> assisting during visits to public departments and offices,
> information concerning daily life in Poznań,> registration for free Polish language courses,
> registration for free job counseling.

More information at MIP website: http://migrant.poznan.pl/en/

With regards,

DEAN’S OFFICE

Migrant Point

NASG letter to Incoming students

Dear First year students,

Poznan University of Medical Sciences’ North American Student government invites you to be a part of our team! To serve our student community, we are looking for two class representatives for the 4 MD program, and one representative for the 6 MD program. The North American Student Government is an organization working as the official voice for all medical students at Poznan University of Medical Sciences. We exist to empower the student body by providing necessary resources and information to students with the ultimate goal of achieving a residency position in the United States or Canada. The NASG is a liaison between the students and the Dean’s Office; seeking to enhance their experience by supporting policies that promote students’ interests, needs, and overall well-being. As an organization our events are: – SCHOOL-WIDE BOOK SALE AND COOKOUT–at least one per semester – STUDENT WORKSHOPS—i.e Suturing – NBME/USMLE –how to prepare – PLANNING ELECTIVES — learn from students who’ve been there – RESIDENCY –how to get them, how to plan – SPORTS DAY –fun in the sun, with some good ol’ fashioned flag football! – MATCH CELEBRATION–meet the grads who matched in US/Canada! Let’s celebrate their achievement!

To apply: please send a paragraph with the following criteria:
1. Tell us about yourself
2. Past experience (that would help organizing information, leading their class)
3. What strengths can you bring to our team? Why would you be a good fit?
4. Tell us about your style in resolving conflict.

Send your applications to decygan@yahoo.com by 10 PM on Sunday, September 28th, 2014.

We look forward to reviewing your applications and making you a part of the NASG team!

NASG_logo

PUMS Admission 2015/2016

PUMS Admission for the 2014-2015 academic year is now closed.
Admission for 2015-2016 academic year will reopen on November 1, 2014.

CBS exams on Oct 11, 2014 (Saturday) and Jan 17, 2015 (Saturday)

Dear students,

This is to inform you that the CBS exams in October 2014 and January 2015 will be held on:

> Saturday October 11, 2014 – not on Monday October 13, 2014 as it was mistakenly scheduled,
> Saturday January 17, 2015 – not on Monday January 19, 2015 as it was mistakenly scheduled.

We are sorry for the inconvenience.

Best regards,

Dean’s office

 

Booksale in the Library should it rain on Sunday Aug 31

Dear students

Please be informed that the Booksale will be held in rooms 2.05, 2.06 and 2.09 in the PUMS Library should it rain this Sunday August 31, 2014. Otherwise the Booksale will go ahead at the dorms Medyk and Aspirynka as originally scheduled.

The Booksale starts at 1pm.

Best wishes

Dean’s office

Book sale Aug 2014

Facebook group for incoming students

Dear Students,

If you would like to get in touch with other incoming students, you are welcome to join a student-administered Facebook group created for this purpose at https://www.facebook.com/groups/1492960850932300.

Regards,

Dean’s Office

ORIENTATION DAYS 2014

All first-year students are most welcome to participate in the Orientation Days starting on August 27 (Wednesday) and ending on August 31, 2014 (Sunday). During these days new students will receive a lot of useful information regarding student loans and visas. They will also meet students from student organizations and members of the Faculty.

Orientation Days 2014 SCHEDULE: click here to follow the link

Note: the Dean’s Office will be closed on AUGUST 28, 2014 (THURSDAY) due to the Orientation Days’14. We will reopen on Friday, AUGUST 29, at the regular hours.

DSC_0068

Andrew Wiktor – meetings on August 27th

Dear Students,

This is to inform you about the visit of Mr. Andrew Wiktor to our University.

Mr. Wiktor will be available to meet the students individually regarding US loan matters on Wednesday August 27, 2014 from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm in the Study Room in Karolek Dormitory (5E, Rokietnicka St. – 2nd floor).

The meetings will take place every 15-20 minutes

Please sign up for meeting with Ms Agata Bartoszewska  (tel. + 48 61 854 7145, email: abartoszewska@ump.edu.pl).

With regards,

DEAN’S OFFICE

Biophysics

During the course students are provided with the information on making laboratory measurements, correct presentation and interpretation of their results and estimation of the experimental uncertainties. Students also acquire the ability of proper handling of laboratory equipment.

The selected laboratory topics concern the physical aspects of:

  • biological processes: diffusion across membranes, some aspects of creation and propagation of the action potential
  • molecular interactions: electrochemical potentials, viscosity, thin films and surface tension
  • interaction of ionizing radiation with matter
  • application and handling of chosen devices in the laboratory diagnostics: microscope, spectrophotometer, polarimeter, radiometer.

Biophysics

On completion of the course the students are expected to know:

  • The physical basis of the functioning of chosen body organs and the influence of physical factors on matter and the human body tissues essential in dental diagnostics and treatment.
  • Thermal and mechanical properties of solids and fluids in the context of dental materials.
  • Have basic skills in handling laboratory equipment, making laboratory measurements, proper presentation of experimental data, their analysis and estimation of the experimental uncertainties.

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED ON AUGUST 15, 2014

Dear Students,

As you may know, Friday, AUGUST 15, 2014, is a national holiday in Poland.

There will be no classes and all University offices will be closed on that day.

We will reopen on Monday, AUGUST 18, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

Admissions period deadline!

Application deadline for the 4-year MD, 6-year MD, 5-year DDS, 6-year PharmD and 3-year BSc Physiotherapy Programs has been extended until August 22, 2014.
NOTE: Admissions period for the pre-professional part of the 6-year PharmD has already been concluded in July 2014.

Admissions for the pre-professional PharmD

Admissions process for the pre-professional part of the 6-year PharmD program has now been concluded.

WHITE COAT CEREMONY 2014

The first ever White Coat Ceremony at Poznan University of Medical Sciences took place on June 3rd 2014 at the Adam Mickiewicz University Hall.

This occasion served as a warm welcome for students to the beginning of their professional university careers and clinical courses. The Deans and other university faculty & officials were present to congratulate the students as they wear their white coats on stage.

Prof. T. Allen Merritt, M.D., MHA, MPH, FAAP, from Loma Linda University School of Medicine a graduate of class 2014 Dr Chelsea Unruh delivered speeches for nearly 180 first-year and second-year M.D. and D.D.S. students attending the White Coat Ceremony.

View the Graduation Cereomony 2014 photo gallery on our Fb page

Watch short video from The White Coat Ceremony 2014

GRADUATION CEREMONY 2014

This year the Graduation Ceremony for English Programs’ students was held on June 3rd. Graduating students, their families as well as PUMS Faculty and staff gathered at the Adam Mickiewicz University Hall to celebrate this special occasion.

Many respect guests honored the Graduation Ceremony with their presence, including Vice-President Prof. Grzegorz Oszkinis, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of Medical Faculty II Prof. Zbigniew Krasiński, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of Medical Faculty I Prof. Ryszard Marciniak, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of Faculty of Pharmacy Prof. Lucjusz Zaprutko, M.Sc., Ph.D., Dean of Faculty of Health Sciences Prof. Włodzimierz Samborski, M.D., Ph.D., as well as Vice-Deans of respective faculties and Associate Deans of the Center of Medical Education in English. Speeches for the graduating class of 2014 were delivered by an eminent phlebologist Dr Thomas L. Eaton, MD, FASA, FACPh and the first graduate of the 4-year MD Program taught in English Dr Jennifer Baker-Porazinski.

Nearly 200 members of the graduating class of 2014 took part in the Graduation Ceremony on June 3rd, including 63 students from the 4-year M.D. Program, 79 students from the 6-year M.D. Program, 41 students from the 5-year D.D.S. Program, 7 students from the Pharm.D. Program and 3 students from the 3-year B.Sc. Physiotherapy Program.

Outstanding graduates were awarded letters of congratulation from the President of the University in recognition of their academic and sports achievements, as well as community service.

View the Graduation Cereomony 2014 photo gallery on our Fb page

Watch short video from Graduation Ceremony 2014

 

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED ON JUNE 19 – 20, 2014

Dear Students,

As you may know, Thursday, JUNE 19, 2014, is the Corpus Christi Day in Poland.
There will be no classes and all University offices will be closed on that day.

The Dean’s Office will be also closed on Friday, JUNE 20, 2014.

We will reopen on Monday, JUNE 23, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

Open lecture by Prof. Argye Hillis on June 11, 2014

The City of Poznań and Poznan University of Medical Sciences invite you to an open lecture by a world-famous specialist in the field of neurology – Professor Argye Hillis.

The lecture entitled “Brain and Language” will take place on June 11, 2014, at 4:00 pm, in the Congress-Didactic Center of Poznan University of Medical Sciences at ul. Przybyszewskigo 37 (room A).

A speech-language pathologist before she became a physician, Dr. Argye Hillis specializes in language and cognitive problems that can result from stroke, brain injuries and dementia.

She is co-editor in chief of Behavioural Neurology, has served as associate editor of Brain, Annals of Neurology, Aphasiology, American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Neurocase, Cognitive Neuropsychology, and Language and Cognitive Processes, and serves on the editorial board of Brain and Language.

Click here to watch a video showing Prof. Argye Hillis’s work

HOURS OFF FOR STUDENTS ON THURSDAY JUNE 5 FROM 4 PM

Dear students,

This is to inform you that the Rector of the University announced hours off on Thursday June 5th, 2014, from 4 pm for all PUMS students so that they can take part in the Juwenalia Students’ Festival. There will be no classes held during the mentioned hours off for all students.

DEAN’S OFFICE

 

PUMS Graduation and White Coat Ceremonies on June 3rd, 2014

On behalf of the School authorities we would like to invite you to the Graduation Ceremony for class 2014 and the first ever White Coat Ceremony taking place on June 3rd 2014 in Adam Mickiewicz University Hall at Collegium Minus (1, Wieniawskiego Street).

The Graduation Ceremony for class 2014 starts at 10:00 am, and the White Coat Ceremony at 12:30 pm.

Please note that the Dean’s Office will be CLOSED on JUNE 3, 2014 (Tuesday).
We will reopen on Wednesday, JUNE 4, at the regular hours.

 

 

INTERCULTURAL WORKSHOPS: 5-6 of June 2014

Discover potential of cultural differences! Intercultural Workshops on 5-6 June 2014

Do you want to find out more about your own intercultural sensitivity and competence, and identify barriers impeding contact at the crossroads of cultures? Workshops on intercultural skills will help you to familiarize yourself with values and norms that are typical for various cultures, and also – on the basis of theories learned during the intercultural workshop – develop the ability to interpret them. The workshops are aimed at students from countries outside the European Union.

Interested persons should send an application form to the following e-mail address: agnieszka.sitko@isp.org.pl by June 2nd, 2014.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/562461463875430/?ref=22
Website: http://isp.org.pl/site.php?id=932&conf=379&lang=2

Click here to downdload the TRAINING SCHEDULE

Q&A SESSION with Jennifer Baker-Porazinski, MD

Dear students,

We are pleased to invite you to Q&A SESSION with Jennifer Baker-Porazinski, MD, who graduated from the 4-year M.D. English language program in 1997 holding DIPLOMA # 0001 (our first student and graduate!).
Dr. Jennifer Baker-Porazinski has been in practice for 17 years and she is now successful family medicine doctor in upstate New York.
You will have an excellent opportunity to receive study advice and coaching from her. She will share her knowledge and experience during the meeting.
DATE+TIME: WEDNESDAY, June 4, 2014, 5.00PM
PLACE: room 202, Coll. Stomatologicum, 70 Bukowska Street

We hope to see you there!

Dean’s office

International Day of Physiotherapy – Scientific and Training Conference, June 4th, 2014

Dear students,

We would like to invite you to join the International Day of Physiotherapy Conference on June 4th, 2014 at the Poznan University Library-Congress Center.

Distinguished Polish and International medicine, physiotherapy, osteopathy and psychology specialists will share their knowledge and experience in working with patients in all age-groups with various diseases. This international meeting aims to bring up current problems in the field of physiotherapy and the new, interdisciplinary approach to the aspects of health sciences.

The conference, divided into three parts (diagnostic part, therapeutic part and workshops), will enable both students and specialists to engage in theoretical and practical analysis of the fascinating medical rehabilitation issues with correspondence to related sciences.

We hope that the interdisciplinary approach to physiotherapy practice will enrich the every-day clinical performance as well as teaching and learning processes.

We encourage you to participate in the 1st International Day of Physiotherapy.

Please fill out the attached registration form in order to receive conference materials and take part in the workshops. Please send the form to physioday@ump.edu.pl by May 30, 2014.

More information:
http://www.fizjoterapia.ump.edu.pl/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=184&Itemid=184
https://www.facebook.com/pages/International-Day-of-Physiotherapy/456088777826286

Sincerely,

Prof. Włodzimierz Samborski, MD, PhD
Prof. Grzegorz Oszkinis, MD

click here to open PDF file

 

Student Information Session: Clinical Elective Abroad

Dear students,
Please be informed that Ms. Shanaz Khan Sulejmanovic (International Education Specialist) from GHLO will be giving an informative session for students on May 22 (Thursday).

WHEN: Thursday, MAY 22, 2014  4pm

WHERE: Collegium Stomatologicum, ROOM no. 202

Click here to learn MORE

GHLObanner icon

CANCELLED LECTURES OF PROF. KARL-HEINZ HERZIG

Dear students,

Due to unforeseen circumstances Prof. KARL-HEINZ HERZIG from the Finnish University of Oulu is unable to give his lectures at PUMS on Wednesday May 21st, 2014.
We apologize for the inconvenience.

Sincerely

Prof. Jarosław Walkowiak

head of the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases

DSA Conference on May 25, 2014

The English Program Students Union (EPSU) would like to invite all students to the annual Dental Students Association (DSA) conference which will take place in the Library on the 25th of May, 2014. Entrance is for free and certificates of attendance will be issued to all participants.

conference

EUROASMUS AND FRIENDS CUP 2014

Dear students,

The third edition of international student football tournament EUROASMUS AND FRIENDS CUP will take place on May 28th.

TO SIGN UP go to:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1xS2oAv20UqrmMSZ-sg1aaLaGCeF4xrFaDddCl6duBNk/viewform

Deadline: May 23, 2014 (23:59).

More information at: http://www.poznan.pl/mim/studia/en/euroasmus-and-friends-cup-2014,p,23177,23178,27436.html

The tournament will take place on May 28th at the stadium Przywodny Rataje Complex, os. Piastowskie 106A in Poznan.

–        10 teams will participate in the competition (first come first service rule).
–        Participants of the tournament are international students (studying in Poznan), representatives of their home countries and/or their international teams, including team Poland.
–        Teams represent exact countries (at least 4 players must be citizenships of that country).
–        Only 1 team can represent exact country (first come first service rule).
–        All the teams must register for the tournament by May 23rd, 2014 (23:59).
–        The teams consist of at least 6 players (max. 10), including a goalkeeper.
–        Single player can represent only one team.

Hoping to see you on the pitch,

Academic Poznań crew
PUMS Dean’s office

euroasmus and friends cup 2014

Prof. HERZIG’s lectures

Dear students

Please be informed that Prof. Karl-Heinz HERZIG will be giving the following guest lectures:

1. Open lecture: Vitamin D – an essential hormone beyond bone health.

Date: MAY 21 (Wednesday) 1:30-3:30 PM

Place: Lecture room SK5, Clinical Hospital No. 5 at 27/33 Szpitalna Str.

2. Lecture for students: Physical activity – the unused potential in health promotion.

Date: MAY 21 (Wednesday) 10:00AM-12:00 PM

Place: Lecture room SK5, Clinical Hospital No. 5 at 27/33 Szpitalna Str.

You are most welcome to come.

Best wishes

The Dean’s office

 

Questions related to admissions

Q: Do you use a rolling admission policy? Are my chance of being accepted lower, if I decide to take my interview late?
A: Yes. Under rolling admission, candidates are invited to submit their  applications to the university anytime within a large window. The window  is usually over six months long, and some schools do not have a  previously specified end date (the window simply closes when all spots  are filled). The university will then review the application and notify  the applicant of their decision within a few weeks from submission.

Q: Does PUMS accept transfer students from other Universities ? What are the requirements?
A:
Unfortunately, PUMS does not accept transfers from other Universities.

Q: What is a difference between Advanced MD and 6-year MD program offered by PUMS?
A: AdvMD program is accessible for university/college graduates (at least B. Sc. degree holders, majoring in natural sciences or pre-med) 6-year MD program is available for high school graduates.

Q: I would like to apply for AdvMD program. I took one of standardized medical admission tests required by PUMS and its result meets PUMS requirement on a minimal score. Do I need to take the written test administered by the University?
A: Yes, all candidates are required to sit written quiz and take the interview with School representatives. Both parts are compulsory.

Q: What are approximate costs of living in Poland?
A: More information you can find here: http://go-poland.pl/cost-living-poland

Q: After training in Poznan, does your Adv MD program give students eligibility to practice in Europe, as well as the United States, after graduation?
A: Yes, but please be aware that the studies undertaken by the student at PUMS end with obtaining the degree of ‘Lekarz’ (Medical Doctor). The license to practice the profession of Medical Doctor is governed by commonly abiding regulations and graduation from the University does not automatically implement the right to practice the profession as every country has different regulations and prerequisites in terms of practice Medicine.

APPLY NOW FOR RESIDENTIAL ADVISOR 2014-2015!

We are looking for qualified PUMS students to join our RA Team for the next academic year!

RAs:

– help provide a safe and quiet environment within each dormitory

– act as mentors and role models

– form a sense of community

Please check your school e-mail account for more information about the application process.

RA_poster

HOURS OFF FOR STUDENTS ON WEDNESDAY MAY 7 FROM 5 PM

Dear students,

This is to inform you that the Rector of the University announced hours off on Wednesday May 7, 2014, from 5 pm for all PUMS students so that they can take part in the MEDYKALIA Students’ Festival. There will be no classes held during the mentioned hours off for all students.

More information about the event is available on Fb page of the PUMS Student Government RUSS: https://www.facebook.com/events/632718686802671/?ref=5

DEAN’S OFFICE

Medykalia 2014

2014/2015 ACADEMIC CALENDAR

2014/2015 ACADEMIC CALENDAR for all English-based Programs at PUMS: click here to follow the link

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED MAY 1-2, 2014

Dear students,

This is to inform you that the Dean’s Office will be closed on May 1 (Thursday) due to Labor Day (May Day) and on May 2 (Friday).

Please be reminded  that there will be no classes on May 1-2.

We will reopen on Monday, May 5, at the regular hours.

Best wishes
DEAN’S OFFICE

Seminar for MD students

Dear Students,

A world renowned Ob/Gyn specialist, Professor Eli Y. Adashi, MD,MS,FACOG, will be visiting PUMS to hold an open seminar on:
1. Ovary-independent ART: Stem cells as a future source of gametes.
2. The globalization of medical education: Emerging models-changing ground rules.

Prof. Adashi is the Senior Consultant for Women’s Health in the World at US Secretary of State and a member of the Board of Directors of Physicians for Human Rights and of Population Connection. You can read an interview with our future guest here: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/760073.

Place: PUMS Library-Congress Center at 37a Przybyszewskiego St., Poznan,
Date+time: May 14, 2014 at 3pm.

You are most welcome to come.

DEAN’S OFFICE

Questions related to the Dentistry Program

Q: I am a dental student. How do I can get the locker at the Collegium Stomatologicum?
A: The locker room for dental students (excluding first year students) is available at Collegium Stomatologicum. In order to secure the locker the dental student should contact Information-desk located at the Main Entrance in the Collegium Stomatologicum and pay refundable deposit in the amount of 50 PLN.

Q:  I’m interested in studying Dentistry. Can someone guide me around the University and can I sit one of the classes or enter into the clinics to see how it looks like?
A: Unfortunately, we are unable to offer you this experience, but there is possibility to arrange a tour around the University and the campus (prior report to the Dean’s Office of Dentistry at dentistry@pums.edu.pl).

Q: Do you offer preparation courses for the DDS applicants?
A:
Regretfully not. We advise you to familiarize with list of topics to prepare for written test and interview. The list is available at our website on the following link: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/PUMS_Topics-for-Test-Interview_2014-15.pdf

Q: Does PUMS accept transfer students from other Universities ? What are the requirements?
A:
Unfortunately, PUMS does not accept transfers from other Universities.

Q: How many courses will I have to study each year?
A:
Detailed curriculum and plan of studies for each year for both faculties can be found on our website: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Curriculum-overview_DDS-Program_updJan14.pdf

Q: How do I can make an appointment with the Associate Dean?
A: The Associate Dean is available in the Dean’s office and the students who need to see him/her must schedule an appointment by e-mailing to the appropriate dean’s office staff. Contact details for DDS office staff are available here: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/contact/cmee/

Q: How do I find more information about the LEK/LDEK exam?
A. Please visit the website of CEM (Centrum Egzaminów Medycznych w Łodzi) at http://www.cem.edu.pl/

Q: Can someone else pick up my transcript or diploma?
A:
Third party recipients must have documentation (i.e. a notarized letter, release of information, power of attorney) from the person whose diploma they are picking up, stating that they are authorized to obtain the diploma/transcript. They must have a current picture ID when they come to get the diploma/transcript.

 

Questions related to medical assistance

Q: How can I make an appointment to the doctor?
A: In order to make an appointment to the family doctor you should contact the Dean’s Office – Mrs. Anna Tomczak, tel. 61 854 72 24. e-mail: atomczak@ump.edu.pl.
More information is available on the following link: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/about/student-information/medical-assistance/

Q: How do I do the medical check up and Salmonella/shigella check-up?
A: PUMS students are required to undergo a medical check-up in order to confirm that they are fit to study medicine/ dentistry/ pharmacy/ physiotherapy.

In the academic year 2016/2017
> first year Advanced MD Program students (medical check-up and salmonella/shigella check-up) are scheduled to have the check-ups done in April and May
> third year Advanced MD Program students (medical check-up) are scheduled to have the check-ups done in April, May and June
> first year 6MD Program students (medical check-up and salmonella/shigella check-up) are scheduled to have the check-ups done in April and May
> fourth year 6MD Program students (medical check-up) are scheduled to have the check-ups done in December, January and February
> second year 5DDS Program students (medical check-up and salmonella/shigella check-up) are scheduled to have the check-ups done in February and March
> fourth year 5DDS Program students (medical check-up) are scheduled to have the check-ups done in February and March
> second year 6PharmD Program students (medical check-up and salmonella/shigella check-up) are scheduled to have the check-ups done in December, January and February
> fourth year 6PharmD Program students (medical check-up) are scheduled to have the check-ups done in December, January and February
> first year Physiotherapy Program students (medical check-up and salmonella/shigella check-up) are scheduled to have the check-ups done in December, January and February

Please use this time period to do the following:
A. Medical check-up
1) pick up your check-up referral at the Dean’s Office (or have a classmate or class representative do it for you – the document includes your name and DOB). The referrals are only valid for one month from the date they were issued.
2) visit the University Outpatient Clinic at 39 Przybyszewskiego St (small building next to Eskulap dorm), where you should undergo blood and urine tests. Urine sample cups are available in all pharmacies [“pojemnik na mocz”]. Tests can be done in the morning, between 7:30-10:20 am.
Collect further referral for chest x-ray (the Outpatient Clinic already has a copy of your x-ray report on file if it was a part of your application documents – in this case it is not necessary to repeat the x-ray examination).
3) If you do not have a valid chest x-ray results on file, visit the specialty outpatient clinic at 1 Szylinga St. to have the examination done: ground floor, entrance B. Opening hours are 8am to 3pm. Test results will be automatically sent to the Outpatient Clinic within 3 working days.
The check-up is mandatory and free of charge.
B. Salmonella/shigella check-up
According to the Regulation of the Polish Minister of Health all students of medical universities are required to undergo an epidemiology screening and obtain a booklet with results of this examination.
In order to acquire this booklet (“Książeczka sanepidowska” – “Sanepid’s booklet”), you should:
1) pick up referral notes from the Dean’s Office (valid for one month starting from the day they were issued),
2) buy three „fecal transport swabs” [in Polish: “wymazówka z podłożem transportowym”] in specialistic pharmacy in Voivodship Sanitary and Epidemiological Station at 60 Nowowiejskiego St. (Monday – Friday 8am-2pm or in other pharmacy)
3) fill out special form, downloadable from Voivodship Sanitary and Epidemiological Station (or available at place): https://wsse-poznan.pl/images/pliki-do-pobrania/download/lab-mikrobiologii/Wyd_3.pdf
4) go to the Laboratory of Microbiology and Parasitology of the Voivodship Sanitary and Epidemiological Station in Poznan (Laboratorium Mikrobiologii i Parazytologii Wojewódzkiej Stacji Sanitarno-Epidemiologicznej w Poznaniu) at 60 Nowowiejskiego St.
– give three stool samples (from three consecutive days, kept at low temperature),
– the laboratory is open Monday – Friday between 8am – 1pm,
– come back to the Lab one week after delivering the samples in order to receive the results of this examination which should be documented in the booklet bought in the lab (2,50 PLN).
After completing all the lab tests (A and B), please visit the University Outpatient Clinic at 39 Przybyszewskiego St. one more time to finalize your check up (doctor’s consultation: Mo, Tue, Thu, Fri: 9am to 2pm; Wed – 9am to 12 noon).

 

 

New edition of the ‘Ready, Study, Go! Poland’ campaign

The Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education has launched a new web page: www.go-poland.pl
This web page is targeted toward foreigners who are interested in studying in Poland.

The portal is already available in English, Portuguese and Ukrainian. Other language versions, including Russian and Chinese, will be available shorlty.

Its great advantage is the searchable database, Studyfinder, with which one may easily find fields of study conducted in Poland in foreign languages at undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate levels, including MBA type programmes. This is a unique application, because its content is developed and edited in real-time by the participating universities (both public and private) themselves, in terms of their own curriculum. On the web page’s launch date, the database already included more than 500 study programmes.

The www.go-poland.pl portal also provides other practical information. It answers questions like why it is worth studying in Poland, what are the underlying principles of Poland’s higher education system or how to prepare for one’s departure to Poland.

‘More and more Polish students go abroad to study, to complete student training or as a benefit of a scholarships. It is also worth popularizing Poland as a place to study for foreigners. This is a large-scale exchange of experiences and skills. The increasing number of foreigners studying at Polish institutions of higher education provides an opportunity for universities as well as a great challenge to create good conditions for these students’, said the Minister of Science and Higher Education, Professor Lena Kolarska-Bobinska.

Presently, 32 thousand of foreigners study in Poland. The government wishes that 5% of all students be foreign students by 2020.

ready-study-go

General questions

Q: What is the national background of your international students?
A:
Take a look at this map view based on the number of students with each citizenship enrolled in 2015/2016:

studmap

Q: Where can I find information about courses offered by Poznan University of Medical Sciences?
A: All course descriptions are available on our website.
For 6MD and AdvMD: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/6-year-m-d-program/description-of-medical-courses/.
For 5DDS: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/5-year-d-d-s-program/description-of-courses-for-5-year-dds-program/
For PharmD: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/the-6-year-pharm-d-program/course-description/
For Physiotherapy: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/3-year-b-sc-physiotherapy/description-of-courses/

Also, each program at Poznan University of Medical Sciences has its curriculum. You can find it on the PUMS website in each program’s tab:
> Curriculum Overview for the Advanced MD at http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/4-year-md-program/curriculum-overview/
> Curriculum Overview for the 6-year MD at http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/6-year-m-d-program/curriculum-overview-for-the-6-year-m-d-program/
> Curriculum Overview for the 5-year DDS at http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/5-year-d-d-s-program/curriculum-overview-for-the-5-year-d-d-s-program/
> Curriculum Overview for the 6-year PharmD at http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/the-6-year-pharm-d-program/curriculum-overview/
> Curriculum Overview for the 3-year Physiotherapy at http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/the-6-year-pharm-d-program/curriculum-overview/

Q: Do students from countries that are members of the EU have to apply for the temporary stay card? Why?
A:
Yes. All students have to legalize their stay in Poland with respect to the Act of 14th July 2006 on the entry into, residence in and exit from the Republic of Poland of nationals of the European Union Member States and their family members (Journal of Laws no 144, item 1043 as amended). Every student that is supposed to stay in our country more then 90 days  has to apply for the temporary stay card. For more information please check http://www.udsc.gov.pl/MAIN,PAGE,264.html.

Q: Who is the 6 MD Program Assistant at the Dean’s Office?
A: Contact details for the Dean’s office staff at the Center for Medical Education in English are available on the following link: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/contact/cmee/

Q: How many classes can I miss?
A:
The allowed number of missed classes is specified in the regulations of each course.

Q: My student ID card is damaged. What should I do?
A: If your student ID card no longer works or has been damaged beyond reasonable use, or if you have changed your personal details (in terms of the information displayed on the card), you should report it to the Dean’s Office and request in writing for a duplicate of ID card. Fee for the new ID card is 17 PLN. The fee should be paid into your individual subaccount number and you are required to deliver receipt of payment to the Dean’s Office. Please make sure to bring your existing card with you.

Q: My student ID card has been stolen. What should I do?
A: You should report it to the Dean’s Office and request in writing for a new ID card. You have to pay 25 PLN fee for a duplicate. The fee should be paid into your individual subaccount number. Please bring receipt of payment to the Dean’s Office.

Q: I am having a problem with a faculty member/teaching assistant. Where do I go for advice?
A: It is always best to discuss the problem with the faculty member/teaching assistant first. If that does not work or is not possible, please visit the head of the department where the course is delivered. If that does not work or is not possible, please contact the Dean’s office consultant Dr Marcin Kucharski at marcinku@ump.edu.pl

Q: How do I can make an appointment with the Associate Dean?
A: The Associate Dean is available in the Dean’s office and the students who need to see him/her must schedule an appointment by e-mailing to the appropriate dean’s office staff. Contact details are available on the following link: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/contact/cmee/

Q: How many courses will I have to study each year?
A:
Detailed curriculum and plan of studies for each year for both faculties can be found on our website: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/about/consumer-information/

Q: Does PUMS accept transfer students from other Universities ? What are the requirements?
A:
Unfortunately, PUMS does not accept transfers from other Universities.

 

 

Questions related to the PharmD Program

Q: Who is in charge of the PharmD Program?
A:
The Associate Dean for Pharmacy at the Center for Medical Education in English is Prof. Franciszek Główka, MSc, PhD., e-mail: glowka@ump.edu.pl

Q: Who is the PharmD Assistant in the Dean’s Office?
A:
 Paweł Kosacki is the PharmD Assistant (ground floor, room no. 2):
tel. +48 61 854 72 31
e-mail: pharmacy@ump.edu.pl
During his absence please contact Mrs. Joanna Zalewska, 6 MD Assistant (1st floor, room 6).

Q: Who do I contact regarding the Vacation Placement in a Community/Hospital Pharmacy?
A:
The coordinator of the Vacation Placement in the PharmD Program is Katarzyna Kosicka, Msc, PhD from the Chair and Department of Physical Pharmacy and Pharmacokinetics:
address: 6 Święcickiego Str., 60-780 Poznań
website: http://kffif.ump.edu.pl/
e-mail: kasiakosicka@ump.edu.pl
tel. +48 61 854 64 31

Q:  Is there a reimbursement for the six-month Traineeship in a Pharmacy?
A: 
You may receive reimbursement for the six month Traineeship in a Pharmacy: 473 PLN for every week of the six month Traineeship in a Pharmacy done abroad (max 24 weeks).
The procedure is as follows:
1. After the six month Traineeship in a Pharmacy deliver the completed Handbook for the six month Traineeship in a Pharmacy (with all signatures)
2. The Dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy signs the Handbook.
3. The Associate Dean for Pharmacy approves the Handbook for the six month Traineeship in a Pharmacy and the amount of the reimbursement. Please note that you have to deliver your account number to the Bursary Office.

Q: Do I have to wait for all the other students to finish their Master’s Thesis in order to have the defence?
A:
No, the defence may be organized for individual students.

Q: When do I get the diploma?
A:
The Dean’s Office has 20 working days to prepare the diploma after receiving all the required documents.
More information is available HERE

 

 

Questions related to the Physiotherapy Program

Q: Who is in charge of the Physiotherapy Program?
A:
The Vice-Dean of Faculty of Health Sciences – Prof. Anna Jankowska, Ph.D., e-mail: ajanko@ump.edu.pl.

Q: Who is the Physiotherapy Assistant in the Dean’s Office?
A:
Paweł Kosacki is the Physiotherapy Assistant (ground floor, room no. 2):
tel. +48 61 854 72 31
e-mail: physioth@ump.edu.pl
During his absence please contact Mrs. Joanna Zalewska, 6 MD Assistant (first floor, room no. 6).

Q: Who do I contact regarding the Practical Training?
A: The coordinator of the Practical Training in the Physiotherapy Program is Paulina Tomal, MSc:
W. Dega Orthopaedic-Rehabilitation Clinical Hospital
No. 135/147, 28 Czerwca 1956r. Str., 61 – 545 Poznań (entrance D, Ist floor)
e-mail: ptomal@ump.edu.pl
Office hours: Tuesdays, 09:00 AM -11.00 AM

Q: Can I have my Bachelor’s Thesis Defence scheduled before I finish classes?
A:
No, you can have the defence scheduled upon the completion of all theoretical and practical courses, including the compulsory physiotherapy practical training, as well as after passing all examinations in the entire course of studies. Moreover, you are required to submit your index book and examination card, and the Bachelor’s Thesis before the denfence.

Q: Do I have to wait for all the other students to finish their Bachelor’s Thesis in order to have the Defence?
A:
The defence can be organized for individual students.

Q: When do I get the diploma?
A: The Dean’s Office has 20 working days from the day of the Defence to prepare the diploma.
More information is available HERE

Q: Where do I apply for the CCPS (Certificate of Current Professional Status)?
A: The document  is issued by the Polish Ministry of Health.
The graduate has to apply for the document on his/her own.
Required documents:
1. Application (in Polish) signed by the graduate (template available here)
2. Diploma and Diploma Supplement (with the Authentication Apostile and Legalization;  remeber to sign it underthe photo)
3. Proof of payment of the service fee in the amount of 17 PLN.
Recipient: Urząd Dzielnicy Śródmieście m.st. Warszawy,
Address: ul. Nowogrodzka 43, 00-691 Warszawa,
transfer title: opłata skarbowa od zaświadczenia
IBAN: PL60 1030 1508 0000 0005 5001 0038.
SWIFT code: CITIPLPX;
4. Graduates who have changed their last name – a document confirming the change (e.g. marriage certificate)

The documents may be sent by post to the following address:
Ministerstwo Zdrowia
Departament Nauki i Szkolnictwa Wyższego
ul. Miodowa 15
00-952 Warszawa.

The Certificate of Current Professional Status will be returned to your mailaing address with all the documents you have submitted. It is issued in Polish so it will have to be translated by a sworn translator.

Questions related to dorms

INCOMING STUDENTS

Q: What kind of accommodation does the Poznan University of Medical Sciences offer and how much is it?
A:
Poznan University of Medical Sciences offers four dormitories designated for English-based Programs’ students and these are Eskulap, Karolek, Medyk and Aspirynka:
http://pums.ump.edu.pl/about/student-information/accomodation/.
They are located close to the Poznan city center.
The cost of living in our dormitory ranges from: 142 USD to 192 USD/month for a single room and 96 USD to 148 USD/month for a double room

Q: When will I be able to make a dorm reservation? I already paid my deposit.
A:
The information about dormitory application for incoming students is emailed to all newly accepted students (that is students who were sent official acceptance letters).
You will receive an email requesting to log into your personal profile at PUMS applicant system and indicate your preferred dormitory facility and room type.
More details re dormitory accommodation for incoming students are available HERE: (open PDF file Information for Incoming Students –> go to section Dormitory Assignments).
Please note that due to a limited number of spots, we can only offer double rooms for incoming students.

Q: I am trying to apply for a dorm room and be put on the waiting list. I was told that first year students can only stay in double rooms. I prefer to live alone and therefore am wondering if I can buy out a whole double room.
A:
Please note that due to a limited number of spots, we can only offer double rooms for incoming students. According to PUMS Dormitory Regulations only currently enrolled students are eligible to sign up for the waiting list, and you will be officially enrolled starting from the first day of classes that for your program.

Q: In the application there is a letter behind the selection of dorms saying m, f or b. That stands for male, female and both, or am I wrong?
A:
Find below a Dormitory Room Type Explanation:
double room (b) = double room with both spots for either female or male residents
double room (f) = double room for female residents
double room (m) = double room for male residentS

Q: I just wonder how the rooms in Karolek and Eskulap are designed. Does each room have its own bathroom or do they have to share on each floor?
A:
In Karolek each room has its own bathroom, in Eskulap there is one bathroom in a suite which consists of two rooms.

Q: I wanted to know if it was possible to request a single room because I have a lot of allergies, severe to pets and some to food as well. If you could please direct me as to how I should proceed to to go about contacting the dorms or someone else that could help me that would be great.
A:
Please note that due to a limited number of spots, we can only offer double rooms for incoming students. You will be able to sign up for the on-line waiting list starting from the first day of the academic year for first-year students in your program.
There are many students requesting single room accommodation due to their health condition and the School does not have as many rooms available to accommodate such requests.

Q: In order to obtain my Polish visa I need proof of residence for my stay. I know decisions for place of residence won’t be made until august but is there any document I could obtain that would prove that I have a place in one of the residences.
A:
The University guarantees places in its dormitories to all incoming students who decide to stay in a dormitory.

Q: I actually signed up for Karolek on the online system for incoming students. Can you tell me when will I know if i can move in early to the Karolek dorm and which room i will have. I am leaving to Poland in a week to visit family and would like to know as early as possible where will I be staying and if I can move into the dorm early.

A: Your registration for Karolek waiting list is invalid as well.  You will be able to sign up for the waiting list  on the first day of the academic year for first-year students in your program using your PUMS student email address.
Please note that you indicated only your dormitory preferences in PUMS applicant system.
Assignments will be made after July 31 on a space-available basis.
The University will guarantee places in its dormitories to all students who decide to stay in a dormitory, but right now we cannot give you the name dormitory you will be assigned to.
Information confirming dormitory assignments will be e-mailed to all students concerned no sooner than the first week of August.

Q: I got accepted for 6 year MD program. I am trying to reserve room in Aspirynka. Currently this room is occupied by my sister. She is graduating this year and I hope to take over renting this room. Can you let me know if you can help me in this matter. I couldn’t find application for the accommodation, and if you can email it to me.
A: It is not possible for you to rent the room your sister is currently staying in. There’s no such thing as inheritance of dorm rooms from the graduating students.

Q: I was wondering if it would be possible to pick a room I prefer since I’ll be arriving there earliest out of everyone. Also, I’m looking into arriving to Poznan around 2AM on August 12th so I was wondering if receptions operate 24/7? (to make sure I could get the key from my room).
A: Please note that incoming students are allowed to move starting from the first Friday after August 20th.
The University guarantees accommodation in its dormitories to 1st year students who express their wish for such accommodation and the choice of the dormitory is made by the University who has updated information regarding vacancies in particular dormitories. It is not possible for students to pick a dormitory in which he/ she will be placed.
Upon arrival to Poznan, you will be informed of your dormitory room number by a porter in the dormitory you were assigned to. Dormitory administration has been informed about your arrival and have prepared rooms for you. You will be able to pick up your room key from the porter. The porter’s office is open 24/7.
Please drop by the dormitory administration office on the next day after your arrival to take care of all formalities. They are open on weekdays between 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Dormitory Administration contact details are available on the following link: click here.

DORMS: WAITING LIST

You can sign up for the waiting list for any of the four PUMS dormitories for English Programs’ Students using the link available HERE
(www.pums.edu.pl, go to For Current Students, go to Accommodation in Dormitory – Waiting list)

You should sign up for each dorm separately.

There’s no such thing as inheritance of dorm rooms from students moving out of dorms.

The confirmation of your waiting list application is sent out automatically after you sign up on the list. Waiting list reports are updated on a monthly basis (on the first working day of each month) and available on the following link.

Please note that an e-mail confirmation of your dormitory assignment from waiting list application will be sent to your student e-mail account by Dormitory Administration when a spot/ room in dormitory becomes available according to the list.

IMPORTANT!
When notified by means of student email and a text message of the possibility to move into a dormitory they signed up for, students are required to reply to an email or a text message sent by Dormitory Administration office and move in within 48 hours from the date indicated in the email/ text message with this information. Students who do not reply Dormitory Administration back within the deadline mentioned above will be automatically removed from the waiting list for respective dormitory

This rule was applied upon students’ requests as many people are waiting for the spot/room in PUMS dormitories, especially in Karolek, and that is the reason why Dormitory Administration gives a seven-day deadline for students to move in.

Dormitory assignments on the basis of waiting list applications are made only when rooms are available and this means it may take weeks/ months before you are placed in your desired dormitory.

NOTE: According to Dormitory Regulations for students in the English Language Programs at the Poznan University of Medical Sciences (PUMS):
section 48)
Any currently enrolled students are eligible to sign up for the on-line waiting list, but dormitory assignments from waiting list can be made only after the University has provided dormitory accommodation to all its first-year and second-year students who registered for dormitory by the end of June of that particular year (first-year students) and by the end of April of that particular year (second-year students). The names of students who signed up for the waiting list are not invalidated with the end of an academic year.
section 49)
As part of dormitory waiting list registrations for a single room the University introduces rules with a high priority on seniority:
a) all students in their last and second-to-last years of study (“senior students”) who apply for a single room get assigned on a strictly first-come, first-served basis,
b) all non-first-year persons that apply for a single room and who do not fit into the “senior students” group as described in Item above will be granted a room, but only after all current “senior students” defined in Item a) have had their requests granted,
c) no first year student will be assigned a single room unless the first two criteria described in Item a) and b) have been satisfied,
d) persons who lived off campus their first year and now wish to come back to the dormitory will have a lower priority than someone who was placed in the dormitory the first year and now wishes to get a single room,
e) students in their last year of study undergoing part of their coursework (e.g. elective rotations) abroad who apply for dormitory accommodation will have priority over other students, but only after the University satisfies requests of all current first-year and second-year students.

The Dormitory Administration Offices will not accept any other form of waiting list applications, so please do not go to those offices in person.

Also, please be reminded that the Dean’s Office requires students to check their university email accounts at least twice a week as sending information by emails is our main method of communication with students.

DORMS: DORMITORY RESERVATION FOR NEXT YEAR

Q: What is the process of reserving a dorm room for next school year?
A:
Students currently staying in dorms are required to let us know whether they wish to extend their dorm reservation for next year by April 30 of each year. We are notifying all students of the procedure to do so by mid-April of each year at the latest. This year residents are required to click on the link in their student email box to reserve dorm for next year, and we will most likely apply the same system in the following years.
More information concerning dormitory reservation for next year is available HERE
(www.pums.edu.pl, go to For Current Students, go to Accommodation in Dormitory: Current Students)

DORMS: GRADUATING STUDENTS

All graduating students must move out of dorms by July 31.

THE RESIDENTIAL ADVISOR (R.A.) SYSTEM AT PUMS

Residential Advisors (R.A.s) help to provide a safe, quiet environment within each dormitory so that residents have a place that is free from distractions for studying and sleeping. R.A.s work with dorm administrators and porters. R.A.s will insure that students are informed of the dormitory’s rules and regulations upon moving in and will enforce them throughout the year.

Please send all inquiries to: resadv@pums.edu.pl

DORMITORY ACCOMMODATION AT PUMS

More information is available on the following links:

http://pums.ump.edu.pl/about/student-information/accomodation/

http://pums.ump.edu.pl/about/student-information/living-in-the-dormitory/

 

 

 

 

Happy Easter!

DEAR STUDENTS

The authorities and the staff of the Center for Medical Education in English want to wish you a Happy Easter!

Please note that due to the holiday break the Dean’s Office will be closed on April 18 (Friday) – April 21 (Monday).

We will reopen on Tuesday, APRIL 22, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

pums_easter 2013

 

 

 

INFORMATION FOR INCOMING STUDENTS!

INFORMATION FOR INCOMING STUDENTS 2014/2015 has been posted on PUMS website

click here to follow the link

Global Spine Outreach at PUMS

In January this year PUMS Orthopedic Hospital hosted a team of doctors from Global Spine Outreach – a nonprofit from Illinois gathering volunteer specialists in Orthopedics to provide complex spinal surgeries to patients who otherwise would not receive care. They also promote innovative methods of treatment of spinal diseases and conditions.

The idea to bring GSP to Poznan came from dr. Krzysztof Siemionow, a graduate of our 4MD Program (and son of the renowned prof. Maria Siemionow) who is himself a member of the organization. Krzysztof Siemionow is currently the Chief of Spine Surgery and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics and Neurosurgery at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

Together with prof. Lawrence G. Lenke, a world-class expert in orthopedics (Chief of Spinal Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Missouri) and dr. Anthony Rinella, experienced spine surgeon from Chicago (founder of Illinois Spine and Scoliosis Center), they partnered with local doctors from PUMS hospital (prof. Tomasz Kotwicki, Chief of Department of Spinal Diseases) to operate several children for scoliosis and kyphosis.

Thanks to their skills, experience and dedication, 8 children aged 5 to 13 have had life-changing spine surgeries. The procedures often involved innovative techniques (first in Poland Shilla Growth Guidance System surgery, intraoperative neuromonitoring), partially basing on modern tools brought along by the GSP.

More photos at https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1454917504721192.1073741838.1407379862808290&type=1

Find out more about the organization at https://www.facebook.com/GlobalSpineOutreach

EDSA Summer Camp 2014 for DDS students

Dear Dental Students,

All Dental Students interested in participating in EDSA Summer Camp 2014 organized by EDSA in Dubrovnik (Croatia) can find detailed information at: http://summercamp2013.edsaweb.org/

Associate Dean for Dentistry
Center for Medical Education in English
Assoc. Prof. Beata Czarnecka, DDS, PhD

Lectures for DDS students on April 4th

Dear students,

We would like to invite you to the lectures of our special guests from University of Zagreb (Croatia):

Assistant Professor Kristina Gorseta: “Techniques for improving the properties of glass ionomer cement”

&

Professor Domagoj Glavina: “Autologous transplantation of teeth”

The lectures will be held on Friday, April 4th, 2014 from 12.15 p.m. – 2.15 p.m. in Collegium Stomatologicum, Lecture Room No 205.

You are most welcome to come.

DEAN’S OFFICE

 

 

 

 

 

 

State-of-the-art hybrid operating room in the Clinical Hospital at Dluga

Thanks to funds from Ministry of Health and hospital’s own funding, the Lord’s Transfiguration Clinical Hospital of PUMS is now equipped with a state-of-the-art hybrid operating room.
This type of OR combines standard surgical equipment with advanced medical imaging devices, enabling live monitoring and imaging from both the OR and the adjacent computerized control room.
In consequence, surgical procedures become minimally invasive and less traumatic and the recovery period shorter. The patient is also safer, because a multitude of procedures can be done in a single room with participation of specialists from different fields. There is no need for moving the patient between various wards or using external diagnostic equipment and any potential emergency can be seen to much faster. This also leads to a more efficient work planning and operation schedule on the hospital’s part.
The room was named after prof. Antoni Jurasz – one of Poland’s greatest surgeons and Head of PUMS Surgery Department in the 1920s and 30s.

Watch the local news report (in Polish): click here to follow the link

 

PUMS at Polish Universities’ Fair across Canada and US

Want to find out more about PUMS? Visit the IV Polish Universities Fair organized by the Fahrenheit Center for Study Abroad. The event will give you an opportunity to meet with PUMS representatives and find out in detail about our educational offer.

The fair will be held in Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Milwaukee, Chicago and Clearwater between March 3 – March 10, 2014.

Click here to learn more: http://www.fahrenheitcenter.org/iv-polish-universities-fair-2014.html

Ulotka_targi_Fahrenheit_2014

Steps for residency in Canada: A guide by Dr. Tom Klosek

Dear students,

We are pleased to invite you to a series of lectures on residency in Canada that will be delivered by Tom Klosek, MD, who graduated from the 4-year M.D. English language program in 2010:

North American electives; Structure and process and paperwork in the North American hospital
WHEN: WEDNESDAY, February 5, 2014, 4-6pm
WHERE: room 16 in Coll. Anatomicum at 6 Swiecickiego St.

Hospital work continued; CaRMS, the residency match, interviews
WHEN: THURSDAY, February 6, 2014, 5-7pm
WHERE: room 16 in Coll. Anatomicum at 6 Swiecickiego St.

After the residency match; an overview of residency
WHEN:FRIDAY, February 7, 2014, 5-7pm
WHERE: room 1 in Coll. Anatomicum at 6 Swiecickiego St.

CLICK HERE to register

Students can be exempted from classes in order to join the lectures as long as they register online and sign in with the sign in sheet at the event. Please contact the dean’s office if you require an exemption.

We hope to see you there!

Dean’s office

Otolaryngology Research Group

The aims of the Research Group will be encouragement of research, both clinically and practically based, in the broad field of Otolaryngology (ENT). We promote interested members of the scientific community to join and engage in activities that associate with surgery, tumor recognition, phonation, and other otolaryngological diseases. The scientific meetings are held at regular intervals throughout the year, to achieve newly based research initiatives that members have the opportunity to take part in. For further contact information please contact the President of the group Adrian Maciejewski at amaciejewski15@gmail.com.

Dr Kucharski’s office hours

Marcin Kucharski, M.D., email: marcinku@ump.edu.pl

Dr Kucharski works as a mediator between the Associate Deans and the students and is the first point of contact regarding students’ concerns. He graduated from the 4-year M.D. English language program and has taught in English at PUMS. Dr. Kucharski may be contacted about such issues as dormitory problems, social matters, and problem-solving.
Dr Kucharski is also 4MD Elective & 6MD Practical Training Supervisor.

Starting from January 14, 2014 his office hours at the Dean’s Office at 41 Jackowskiego Str. are as follows:
Open: 2:00-4:00 PM, Tuesdays (except holidays)
Location: first floor, room no. 8 at the Dean’s office at Jackowskiego
For: dormitory problems, social matters, and problem-solving , as well as 4MD elective and 6MD practical training enquiries.

 

 

 

 

Conference-Workshop: Clinical Consultation The Key To Successful Medical Practice

We invite all English speaking students and doctors of all faculty to the Conference-Workshop: Clinical Consultation The Key To Successful Medical Practice on Monday January 20, 2014 at 12-4 pm at Centre of Medical Biology, 8 Rokietnicka Street hall no. 3008

The main speaker and the chairman of the event is UMP Visiting Professor:
Prof. Richard Vincent, Emeritus Professor of Cardiology and formerly Co-founder and Associate Dean, Brighton and Sussex Medical School; Founding Head, Institute of Postgraduate Medicine Brighton and Sussex Medical School; Chair of Executive Committee, PRIME Partnerships in International Medical Education.
Co-chaired by:
Dr. Aleksandra Bojarska, Consultant Anaesthetist, University Hospital of South Manchester, UK
Dr. Magdalena Witt, Head of the Dept. of Rescue and Disaster Medicine, PUMS
Invited speaker:
Prof Ewa Mojs, Head of the Dept. of Clinical Psychology, PUMS
Facilitated by the Department of Rescue and Disaster Medicine with the cooperation of Department of Clinical Psychology, PUMS

Students have permission to attend the conference-workshop as an alternative to their regular classes or clinical work.  Certificate of attendance will be provided.

Registration via e-mail address: ekaniewska@ump.edu.pl

Click here to download the CONFERENCE PROGRAM

 

 

Christmas week in the Dean’s office

DEAR STUDENTS,

In the Christmas and New Year’s week the Dean’s Office will be closed on the following days:

– December 19, 2013 from 1.30 pm till 3.30 pm

– December 24-26, 2013

– December 31, 2013

– January 1, 2014

– January 6, 2014

The authorities and the staff of the Center for Medical Education in English want to wish you a Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

DEAN’S OFFICE

PUMS 20th Anniversary: lectures for students

Dear Students,

This year we are celebrating 20th anniversary of English language programs at our University. In celebration of our anniversary we would like to offer you the opportunity to meet and listen to the University advisors, consultants and lecturers from all around the world.

Please find attached detailed schedule of interesting meetings/lectures: click here to open PDF file

Best regards

Dean’s Office

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED on NOVEMBER 28, 2013 at 2 PM and on DECEMBER 2, 2013

Dear Students,

This is to inform you that the Dean’s office will be CLOSED:

> on Thursday, November 28, 2013 at 2 pm due to Thanksgiving Party.

> on Monday, December 2, 2013 (all day) due to 20th Anniversary Gala.

Best wishes

The Dean’s office

Questions related to fees

Q: When is the payment deadline for tuition?
A:
1st installment of tuition fee should be paid by Sept. 30 and the 2nd installment by Feb. 15

Q: How can I get the dorm deposit back?
A:
First of all you should decide how you want to get it back: in cash or by a wire transfer. If you prefer a wire transfer you should provide us with your bank information: the name of the bank, address of the bank, account number and swift code or routing number and send it to the bursary office via e-mail.

Q: Why I am charged statutory interest rates if I have sent the money on Sept. 30?
A:
You are charged statutory interest rates because PUMS received the money after the deadline.

Q: What should I do to extend my payment deadline?
A:
You should write a letter to the President Grzeskowiak and send it to the bursary office via e-mail. You should write in this letter why you can’t pay your fees on time.

Q: Can I pay the 1st installment of tuition fee in PLN and the 2nd one in USD?
A:
Tuition fee should be paid in PLN. For students paying their fees in a currency different from PLN, the amount will be calculated into PLN in accordance with the exchange rate of the University bank.

Q: I have been rejected from the list of PUMS students due to failure to complete 1st year of studies. I’ve missed just Anatomy course. I would like to continue my further education back home and I’m wondering if I can get tuition refund for the first year?
A: Refund of tuition fee is applicable only to students who resign from studies on a specific conditions described in the Agreement between PUMS and student, not to the students who are removed from the list of students due to failure to meet requirements.

Questions related to graduation

Q: What degree will be on the diploma of MD Program graduates?
A:
LEKARZ

Q: Why the degree on the diploma is Lekarz?
A:
According to EU regulation the name on the diploma needs to be in the native language of the country where the studies were conducted.

Q: How does the ECFMG verification process look like?
A:
After having your diploma legalized in Warsaw you need to send following documents:
-2 photocopies of the diploma in Polish
-2 photocopies of the diploma in English
-1 form 344
-2 forms 345
-1 photograph
to
Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG)
Attn: Registration and Credentials Services
3624 Market St., 4th floor
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2685
USA

You need to include your full name and USMLE/ECFMG ID on the front of all credentials and the back of the photograph before sending to ECFMG.

After ECFMG received those documents, they put you in online system (it usually takes up to 3 weeks for them to process online application). After that is online verification – something what your office administrative does and it takes about 5 days. After that you should receive ECFMG verification needed to start your residency.

Q: Is it necessary to go personally to Warsaw to legalize diplomas?
A:
No, you can write an authorization for somebody who takes your diploma in your behalf and attach copy of your passport.

Q: Is it possible to receive extra copies of the diploma?
A: It is not possible to get any extra copies. Graduate receives 1x original diploma in polish, 2x copies in Polish, 1xcopy in English.

Q:  How much does the diploma cost and where do I pay?
A:
The diploma fee amounts to 100 PLN and should be paid to your individual student subaccount. Please remember to include your name and fee description in the payment memo. Bring the proof of payment along when picking up your diploma.

Q: When do I get the diploma?
A: The Dean’s Office has 20 working days to prepare the diploma after receiving all the required documents.
Please see: http://pums.ump.edu.pl/programs/information-for-graduates/

Q: How do I find more information about the LEK/LDEK exam?
A: Please visit the website of CEM (Centrum Egzaminów Medycznych w Łodzi) at http://www.cem.edu.pl/

Q: Can someone else pick up my transcript or diploma?
A: Third party recipients must have documentation (i.e. a notarized letter, release of information, power of attorney) from the person whose diploma they are picking up, stating that they are authorized to obtain the diploma/transcript. They must have a current picture ID when they come to get the diploma/transcript.

Q: Can I bring children or other member of my family to the Graduation Ceremony?
A: Yes. However, please be aware that this is a formal occasion, and children could easily become anxious. The Assembly Hall capacity is limited and we cannot ensure a place for members of your family.

Q: How long is graduation ceremony?
A: Ceremony lasts for approximately one and a half hours.

 

 

 

 

 

Updated topics for test and interview

TOPICS FOR WRITTEN TEST AND INTERVIEW for 2014/2015 have been posted on PUMS website

read more

THE DEAN’S OFFICE WILL BE CLOSED ON NOVEMBER 11, 2013

Dear Students,

On November 11 we will be celebrating the Polish Independence Day and all offices will be closed.

The Dean’s Office will reopen on Tuesday, November 12, at the regular hours.

We wish you a pleasant weekend,

The Dean’s Office

Panel interview strategies, tips and practice – workshop in Toronto

If the difficult task of choosing your future alma mater is still ahead of you and you are in need of information to help you with the choice, you are more than welcome to attend free workshops on November 6th at University of Toronto, Galbraith Building to learn about panel interview, open, closed and mixed interview tips and strategies. The event will give you an opportunity to meet with PUMS representatives and find out in detail about our educational offer.

The workshop will be held at University of Toronto, Galbraith Building on November 6th, 2013.

More details available on the following website: click here to follow the link

Register at http://workshop19.eventbrite.com

Click here to downlad the workshop poster

Lecture of Professor Lakshman P. Samaranayake on Nov 4, 2013

DEAR ENGLISH PROGRAMS’ STUDENTS,

We would like to invite you to the lecture of

Professor Lakshman P. Samaranayake Hon DSc, BDS (Sri Lanka), DDS (Glasgow), MRCPath (UK), FRCPath (UK), MIBiol, Cbiol (UK),FDSRCSE (Hon), FHKCPath, FHKAM (Dental Surgery),FHKAM (Pathology), FCDSHK

Dean of Dentistry
Tam Wah-Ching Endowed Professor in Dental Science
Chair Professor of Oral Microbiology
Faculty of Dentistry, the University of Hong Kong
Director, the Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong

entitled “Oral Biofilms and Systemic Disease”

that will be held on Monday, November 4th, 2013 from 9.30 – 10.30

in Collegium Stomatologicum Lecture Room No 205

You are most welcome to come.

Vice Dean of Medical Faculty II  Assoc. Prof. Anna Surdacka, D.D.S., Ph.D.
Assoc. Dean for Dentistry Assoc. Prof. Beata Czarnecka D.D.S., Ph.D.

HOURS OFF for PUMS STUDENTS – THURSADY OCTOBER 31, 2013 + DAY OFF ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Dear Students,

This is to inform you that the Rector of the University announced hours off on THURSDAY OCTOBER 31, 2013 from 2 pm. There will be no classes held during the mentioned hours off.

As you may know, Friday, November 1, 2013, is the All Saints’ Day in Poland. There will be no classes and all University offices will be closed on that day. Classes will resume and University offices will reopen on Monday, November 4th.

Best wishes and enjoy the long weekend,

The Dean’s Office

END OF THE DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME AT 2 A.M. ON SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013

Dear Students,

Please remember to move back by one hour all of your timekeeping devices on this Sunday, October 27, 2013.

Have a good weekend,

The Dean’s Office

Admission and application deadlines 2014/2015!

Admission period for all English-based Programs at PUMS for the academic year 2014/2015 ends on August 31, 2014.

Application deadline: JULY 31, 2014.

INAUGURATION DAY on OCTOBER 3, 2013

Dear students,

This is to remind you that the official opening of the new academic year (“inauguration“) will be held on October 3, 2013 at 11 a.m. in Collegium Minus (1, Wieniawskiego Street).

All students should wear formal clothes. The presence on this ceremony is obligatory for all first year students.

Ten selected first year students of the English Language Programs (two students from each program) will be given indexes (grade books) by the President and the Dean. These students will be asked at the stage by their names. Afterwards, all students will take the student oath in front of the authorities of the Poznan University of Medical Sciences.

Best wishes

Dean’s Office

INTERSTUDENT 2013 contest

Who is the best international student in Poland?

There are more and more international students choosing Poland as their education destination – currently the group constitutes over 29 thousand students. They became an integral, yet not always appreciated part of Polish academic environment. The INTERSTUDENT competition is a first initiative of this kind in Poland, fully concentrating on the international student community.

The competition is aimed at the international students studying at Polish Higher Education Institutions on the Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral levels. Both foreign students and students with dual citizenship ale eligible to apply. Students should be able to prove their activity at the cultural, social, ecological or sport levels. They should be able to demonstrate behaviors promoting the ideas of multiculturalism maintain good academic achievements and inspire others with their input in the shape of the local community.

We cordially invite you to submit filled-out applications of the students who stand out by their energetic life position and actively participate in the multicultural student community life:

Contest Questionnaire click here to follow the link

Application deadline: October 8, 2013.

The INTERSTUDENT 2013 contest results will be announced on November 8, 2013 during the Ceremony of the Polish Student Parliament Awards.

Contact person:

Julia Łysik, tel. 22 628 58 62 ad. 15, fax. 22 629 16 17, email: j.lysik@perspektywy.pl

More information: click here to follow the link

PLEASE NOTE:

All students of MD, DDS and Pharmacy Programs in English at our University are Master’s degree students, and Physiotherapy – Bachelor’s degree students.

DEAN’S OFFICE

Sadhana Dharmapuri’s lecture on August 30, 2013

Dear students,

We are pleased to invite you to “Adolescent Growth and Development – US point of view” lecture delivered by Sadhana Dharmapuri, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Adolescent Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin.

Lecture will cover: Stages of development, Alcohol and substance abuse screening, HEADESS screening.

WHEN: FRIDAY, August 30, 2013, 12.00 PM

WHERE: Room A212 in Collegium Stomatologicum at 70 Bukowska St.

Sadhana Dharmapuri, MD graduated from the 4-year M.D. English language program in 2003.

We hope to see you there!

Dean’s office

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED ON AUGUST 29, 2013

Dear Students,

This is to inform you that the Dean’s Office will be closed on AUGUST 29, 2013 (THURSDAY)

due to the Orientation Days’13.

We will reopen on Friday, AUGUST 30, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED ON AUGUST 15-16, 2013

Dear Students,

As you may know, Thursday, AUGUST 15, 2013, is a national holiday in Poland. There will be no classes and all University offices will be closed on that day.

The Dean’s Office will be also closed on Friday, AUGUST 16, 2013.

We will reopen on Monday AUGUST 19, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

 

International Summerschool of Acupuncture in Germany

Dear students,

from 19th to 26th of August, 2013  Inspirations for Health hosts an International Summerschool of Acupuncture for medical students and young doctors in Germany close to Berlin.

More information:

FLYER click here to open PDF file

WEBSITE: click here to follow the link

 

 

 

 

 

Admissions period deadline!

Admissions period for the 4-year MD, 5-year DDS, 6-year PharmD and 3-year BSc Physiotherapy Programs has been extended until August 5, 2013.
NOTE: Admissions period for the 6-year MD program has already been concluded in July 2013.

Application deadlines!

Admissions period for the 6-year MD program has been concluded.

Application deadline for all other programs has been extended to July 15, 2013!

3 days left in “Let it Happen in Poznan” blog contest !

Let it happenHurry up!
Only 3 days left to win attractive prizes in last edition of “Let it Happen in Poznan” blog contest for foreign students!

You can win:
– Voucher for a double room per 1 night with breakfast in Novotel Poznań Malta Hotel
– Voucher to “Cafe Bordo” restaurant
– Voucher to “Pyra Bar” restaurant
– Voucher to “Marchewkowe Pole” restaurant
– Voucher to “Marchewkowe Pole Zupy” restaurant

Vouchers are valid till the end of the year:)

Check last winners on http://www.poznan.pl/mim/studia/en/let-it-happen-in-poznan-blog-contest,p,23177,23178,24610.html

 

Medical Survival Camp July 22-27, 2013

click on image for more information

Medical Survival Camp_Uniejów_Jul'13

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED ON MAY 29 – 31, 2013

Dear Students,

This is to inform you that the Dean’s Office will be closed on MAY 29, 2013 (Wednesday) due to the Graduation Ceremony.

As you may know, Thursday, MAY 30, 2013, is the Corpus Christi Day in Poland.

There will be no classes and all University offices will be closed on that day.

The Dean’s Office will be also closed on Friday, MAY 31, 2013.

We will reopen on Monday, JUNE 3, at the regular hours.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

PREP2MATCH seminars on May 27 and May 28, 2013

Dear students,

We are pleased to invite you to “PREP2MATCH” seminars delivered by Prof. T. Allen Merritt, MD, MHA from Loma Linda University and Jan Mazela, MD, PhD from PUMS Neonatology Department that will be held on:

  • on Monday MAY 27th, 2013 from 4:30 – 6:00 pm in the seminar room in the Neonatology Department at 33 Polna Str.
  • on Tuesday MAY 28th, 2013 from 4:30 – 6:00 pm in the seminar room in the Neonatology Department at 33 Polna Str.

NOTE: Students are required to sign up for the seminars with their class representatives by MAY 22, 2013.

click here to learn more about the PREP2MATCH

We hope to see you there!

Dean’s office

HOURS OFF FOR STUDENTS ON THURSDAY MAY 23 FROM 3 PM

Dear students,

This is to inform you that the Rector of the University announced hours off on Thursday May 23, 2013, from 3 pm for all PUMS students so that they can take part in the Juwenalia Students’ Festival. There will be no classes held during the mentioned hours off for all students.

DEAN’S OFFICE

Prof. HERZIG and Prof. KOLETZKO’s lectures

Dear students

Please be informed that Prof. Karl-Heinz HERZIG will be giving the following guest lectures:

1. Open lecture: Gut-brain axis – the communication between the periphery and the CNS.

Date: MAY 24 (Friday) 1:15-3:00 PM

Place: Lecture room SK5, Clinical Hospital No. 5 at 27/33 Szpitalna Str.

2. Lecture for students: Adipose tissue and inflammation.

Date: MAY 23 (Thursday) 10:15AM-12:00 PM

Place: Lecture room SK5, Clinical Hospital No. 5 at 27/33 Szpitalna Str.

and Prof. Berthold KOLETZKO will be giving guest lectures on the following days

1. Open lecture: Early metabolic programming of long-term health – from concepts to practical application.

Date: MAY 17 (Friday) 1:30-3:00 PM

Place: Lecture room SK5, Clinical Hospital No. 5 at 27/33 Szpitalna Str.

2. Lecture for students: Child obesity – causes and prevention.

Date: MAY 17 (Friday) 10:15 AM-12:00 PM

Place: Lecture room SK5, Clinical Hospital No. 5 at 27/33 Szpitalna Str.

You are most welcome to come.

Best wishes

The Dean’s office

INFORMATION FOR INCOMING STUDENTS!

INFORMATION FOR INCOMING STUDENTS 2013/2014 has been posted on PUMS website

click here to download the file

EUROASMUS AND FRIENDS CUP 2013

Dear students

The second edition of international student football tournament EUROASMUS AND FRIENDS CUP 2013 will take place on June 6.

TO SIGN UP go to: https://www.facebook.com/events/309466422517147/

More information at: http://www.poznan.pl/mim/studia/en/euroasmus-and-friends-cup-2013,p,23177,23178,24839.html

Hoping to see you on the pitch,

Academic Poznań crew

PUMS Dean’s office

euroasmus-and-friends-cup-2013

RA applications will be closing on May 5th!

Dear students,

RA applications will be closing on May 5th.  Interviews will be conducted shortly after and positions will be offered to qualified candidates.  If any positions remain, we will re-open the applications.  If you wish to be an RA for the academic year 2013-2014, please make sure to get your application in by May 5th!

Dean’s office

SIMWARS 2013

Dear students,

The purpose of SimWars_2013 is for a group of 3-5 students to compete against each other in a simulated clinical scenario. The patient you will be responsible for managing is a new generation of human patient simulators.

You are able to do a full physical and history with the human patient simulator. You can listen to heart, lung and bowel sounds; check pulses, blood pressure, EKG, arterial blood pressure, pulse ox and monitor Swan-Ganz readings. Skills you can perform include: intubation; cricothyroidotomy, defibrillation, cardioversion, pacing, needle decompression, chest tube insertion, foley catheterization and intraosseous infusion.

Your patient has physiological pupils, can sweat, cry, bleed, urinate and seize!

Top prize will go to the team who makes it to the final round and achieves top scores. You will be scored by a panel of judges on your knowledge, skills, communication and teamwork.

Register in four or five-person teams at simwars.evenea.pl

Additional questions? Email : medsim@ump.edu.pl

Elimination is on May 14-15, 2013 and

Final on May 17 in Lublin, 2013

 Register on-line by May 5. 2013

Practical guide for foreign students: Poznan in 5 steps!

Dear students,

Check the new practical guide for foreign students!

The new brochure prepared by Poznan Tourist Organisation is short and practical: provides useful websites, tips and information about attractions in Poznań.

You can download the guide HERE

Best wishes

The Dean’s office

Poznan in 5 steps

DEAN’S OFFICE CLOSED MAY 1-3, 2013

Dear students,

This is to inform you that the Dean’s Office will be closed on May 1 (Wednesday) and May 3 (Friday) due to Labor Day (May Day) and Polish Constitution Day respectively, as well as on May 2 (Thursday).

Please be reminded that there will be no classes on May 1-3.

We will reopen on Monday, May 6, at the regular hours.

Best wishes

DEAN’S OFFICE

 

AMU PreMed course!

If you’re thinking of applying to PUMS, but you’re missing the pre-medical coursework, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan is just starting with a program that might be just the thing for you:

AMU PreMed is a 1-year long university prep course in biology, chemistry and physics designed for future medical school applicants. This esteemed school is also located in Poznan, Poland, and is home to many successful scientists and experienced academics. There are around 1,000 international students currently enrolled at Adam Mickiewicz University out of a total of 50,000.

Learn more at: http://international.amu.edu.pl/AMUPreMed/amu-premed

AMUPreMed

click here to download leaflet in PDF format

New academic calendar 2013/2014!

2013/2014 ACADEMIC CALENDAR for all English-based Programs at PUMS is available here

Now accepting applications for Residential Advisor (RA) positions in dormitories for 2013/2014 academic year!

Dear students,

The University administration and the Residential Advisors (RAs), with
support from the EPSU and NASG, are welcoming committed students from the
English speaking programs to apply to become Residential Advisors for the
Academic Year 2013/2014. Any student from the English speaking programs may
apply.

click here for more information

RA_applications_2013

Daylight Saving Time (DST) starts at 2 A.M. on Sunday March 31, 2013

Dear Students,

Please remember to move all of your timekeeping devices ahead one hour on Sunday, March 31, 2013.

Best wishes,

The Dean’s Office

 

Happy Easter!

DEAR STUDENTS,

The authorities and the staff of the Center for Medical Education in English want to wish you a Happy Easter!

Please note that due to the holiday break the Dean’s Office will be closed on March 29 (Friday) – April 1 (Monday).

We will reopen on Tuesday, APRIL 2, at the regular hours.

Best wishes, The Dean’s Office

pums_easter 2013

 

Gross Anatomy

This course is focused on teaching the morphological and functional anatomy of the human body. The goal is to assist the student in developing a three-dimensional, visual image of the way the human body is built. Each student, as a member of a team, carries out a complete dissection of the cadaver. The course consists of lectures devoted mostly to basic anatomy, and of laboratory work devoted to cadaver dissection and the study of cross-sections, pro-sections, skeletal material, models, and x-rays. The anatomical background and vocabulary are presented and used to establish the clinical correlations to other basic medical sciences.

Neuroscience

This course takes on an interdisciplinary approach to the understanding of the organization and the functioning of the central nervous system. It includes a general overview of the basic elements, gross structure, and the appropriate terminology. Students first learn simultaneously parts of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropathology with the clinical neurological pathologies stressed later. Lectures are supplemented by laboratory sessions consisting of human brain dissections and the study of neurophysiology.

Biochemistry

This course introduces the basic principles of biochemistry: the mechanisms of biochemical reactions, biosynthesis, utilization, and the degradation of major constituents of the human body in order to explain the biochemical and pathological bases for various diseases.

Exploration of the metabolic characteristics of each organ is correlated to the understanding of the metabolic interplay between organs. Students learn the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. This course places emphasis on both chemistry and molecular biology providing a biochemical framework for clinical studies.

Human Physiology with Elements of Biophysics

This course acquaints students with the dynamic functional interrelationships that exist between cells, tissues, and organ systems, so that students develop an understanding of the human organism as a whole. The course begins with elements of biophysics and provides a review of the key points previously covered by students in the areas of anatomy, cell biology, and histology. Later, lectures and laboratory exercises are provided on the physiology of the following major body systems: gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive.

Microbiology and Parasitology

This course introduces the basic principles of microbiology including: classification and taxonomy, microbial physiology, the host-parasite relationship, and the epidemiological concepts. Also covered are the epidemiology, symptomology, pathogenesis, laboratory diagnosis, and therapy of the major bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens. The laboratory portion of the course includes laboratory methods in bacteriology, mycology, and parasitology.

Biology

This biology course consists of two parts: 2

  • Five lectures on host-parasite relationships — routes of parasite transmission; their morphological, immunological, and biochemical adaptations to the host environment; and the emergence of new pathogens in the human body.
  • Nine seminars focusing on the following basic problems of human genetics:
    • procaryota and eucaryota — genomes, gene structure, and function
    • the basics of cell differentiation and genetic control of morphogenesis
    • genetic control of sex determination in humans and in animals
    • eco- and pharmacogenetics
    • immunogenetics
    • elements of biotechnology
    • transgenic organisms — are they safe for humans and environmentally friendly?
    • the impact on public health of the abiotic and biotic components in food
    • parasite genetics

Medical Chemistry

This medical chemistry course covers bio-inorganic, bio-organic, and physical chemistry in the basic range of problems concerning the structure, properties, and transformations of biomolecules. Knowledge of these issues is necessary for students to learn and understand the metabolism (biochemistry), the mechanisms of quantitative and qualitative changes (clinical chemistry and pathobiochemistry), and their control (prevention and treatment).

The course consists of lectures, seminars, and laboratory classes, and it introduces students in the first year of the 6-year M.D. program to a variety of physical and chemical properties of organic substances, reactions of the functional groups found in biological molecules, basic chemistry of biological macromolecules, the role of buffer systems, electrolytes and metal ions in biological systems, and to some aspects of enzyme kinetics. Students are introduced to the properties and chemical concepts of important classes of compounds to help them understand the behavior and function of biomolecules in the body.

Philosophy

This course presents the origin, the development, and the present condition of philosophical thinking. It introduces the students to the nature of philosophical problems through discussions, and to the role of Plato as the originator of the new mode of thinking and as the founder of the so-called Great Problems. It outlines the development of philosophy by presenting the greatest thinkers’ ideas as the struggle to reformulate, refine, and solve the Great Problems. Finally, it shows how the 20th-century philosophers suspended the inquiry into the Great Problems shifting their attention to the new ideas about the mind, language, and society.

Introduction to Medicine

The main course objective is to teach students how to study medicine most efficiently. This course, based on former students’ knowledge and experiences, helps the current students start their medical training. It consists of lectures presenting the methods of studying different subjects, e.g., biophysics, anatomy, histology, physiology, and the clinical sciences. It also demonstrates the role of basic sciences in the clinical practice.

Biophysics

Biophysics is an interdisciplinary science which combines various disciplines such as physics, chemistry, mathematics, biology, and medical sciences. It deals primarily with physical phenomena occurring in live organisms of all types — from molecules, cells, and tissues through single organs, organ systems, and organisms, and finally in the human population and the biosphere. Therefore, the main course objective in biophysics is to provide students with an understanding of the basic physical processes that underlie the phenomenon of life. This course also includes the basic issues of the modern imaging techniques applied in medicine, and the physical processes that reveal the interaction between the environment and the human body.

Lecture topics include: biophysical aspects of the circulatory and respiratory systems, the visual system, the auditory system, the thermodynamics of biological systems, and the physical basis of transmembrane transport.

The biophysics seminar topics are varied and include long-wave electromagnetic radiation. Among them are:

  • the effects of the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation on materials and tissues;
  • the thermodynamics of biological systems, and the physical basis of transmembrane transport;
  • radiation therapy and radiation and ultrasound therapy
  • magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • ionizing radiation in tomography: x-ray computer tomography (CT), SPECT and PET, and electrocardiography

Topics covered in laboratory classes are complementary to the lectures and introductory to issues discussed during the seminars.

Histology

This course provides basic knowledge of the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organs at the microscopic level, enabling students to recognize and identify all major cell and tissue types in the human body. The normal structural characteristics are correlated to the physiological process as a background material for the study of microscopic pathology. Lectures are illustrated with relevant audiovisual materials and photomicrographs. During the laboratory sessions, each student has the use of a binocular microscope and a collection of over 80 stained tissue slide preparations. Computer analysis of cells and histochemical reactions are discussed in seminars and demonstrations.

Embryology

This course introduces the basic and clinical aspects of normal and abnormal human development. Included in it as a major part of the course is the organogenesis that is the origin and formation of all organ systems in the human body. The various congenital anomalies are explained as deviations from normal development.

Teaching is conducted in lectures. Embryology is also taught in the courses on anatomy and histology.

Medical Sociology

The objective of this course is to provide an overview of the current and the probable future expansion of the society’s role in the regulation of the practice of medicine. The stress is put on the basic aspects of malpractice, including the definition of negligence and the assessment of damages.

Another group of topics presented during this course is related to drug abuse, including alcohol. Also discussed will be: behavioral toxicology and behavioral disturbances; inhalant drugs and their impact on schoolchildren; nutritional and legal aspects of drug use, cigarette smoking, and the effects of drugs on growth and development.

The strategies for dealing with the alcohol or substance abuse problems will also be presented, with the emphasis placed on stimulating the awareness of, interest in, and inquiry into the historical trends, issues, controversies, and realities of providing effective programs for addressing them.

Lastly, the problem of spouse and child abuse will be covered. It will be discussed together with its sociologic and psychological causes, and with the existing diagnostic and prevention techniques.

Public Health

The course in public health is intended to develop the essential knowledge of the health of the population, as influenced by internal and external factors to the community, including its relations with and the functioning of the healthcare systems. This course also focuses on developing the kind of attitudes and skills which are desired in a future doctor who is active in the social, political, and economic arenas.

Upon completing the course, students should gain a basic understanding of public health as (a) a science and a medical discipline, (b) as a field for practical activities — both from the theoretical and the practical viewpoint, (c) and with respect to its historical as well as contemporary aspects. It also emphasizes the way in which public health contributes to the health status of a population.

Medical Genetics

This course offers an understanding of the contribution of genetic diseases to human morbidity and mortality. The basic aspects of DNA chemistry, structure, function and regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes are taught using clinical examples. The clinical applications of genetic principles and laboratory techniques, including chromosomal characterization, are emphasized. Case presentations are used to illustrate the basic principles of genetic diseases.

Pathology

General pathology emphasizes those changes or reactions which may occur in various diseases and in different organs. The lecture series covers: cell injury and death, inflammation, blood coagulation, thrombo-embolism and infarction, vascular diseases, tumors, immune deficiency diseases, infectious diseases, environmental pathology, and the diseases of infancy, childhood, and the old age. The laboratory work involves study of the material arranged in a series of modules. These modules contain not only color transparencies of gross and microscopic changes but also a number of electron photomicrographs. The systemic pathology part of the course will deal with specific diseases affecting the various organs of the body. The laboratory sessions for this module consist of the examination of a series of slides arranged to correspond with the lecture material which shows the microscopic changes at the various stages of disease.

Morphological Basis for Clinical Diagnosis

This course offers students a unique opportunity to focus on carefully selected clinical cases. It is intended as a feedback and revision aid so that students can assess the extent of the limitations to their understanding of pathology.

First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Students learn how to manage the practical knowledge of resuscitation. Most common emergencies that will be studied are: post-traumatic bleeding, bone fractures, cardiac arrest, hypo- and hyperthermia, pneumothorax etc. Emphasis is put on the prompt diagnosis of acute cardiac and respiratory failures.

Law and Ethics

This course includes a series of lectures and discussions designed to show how doctors’ lives and work are affected by civil and criminal law, and how to help them meet the challenges posed by the various ethical problems. Starting with those before birth and up to those after death, faced by physicians throughout their medical practice.

Medical Polish

This course is designed to develop basic communication skills in Polish. The scope of this course will cover common, everyday situations including: patient interviews, gathering of medical data, and the basic conversation skills required to conduct medical examinations in Polish clinics.

Latin

The Latin in medicine course is designed for foreign students taking Medical Latin in order to provide them with a general knowledge of Latin.

This course directly assists students with improving their ability to read and write medical prescriptions and diagnoses.

It consists of 30 lessons which cover the basics of grammar illustrated with examples. Each lesson is comprised of two parts — a grammar section explaining grammar rules, and an exercise section with sentences and proverbs illustrating vocabulary usage. The goal of these lectures is to teach essential, specialized vocabulary and grammar so that students learn to understand the medical terminology. Another goal is to teach the structure of and the creation of medical and chemical terminology, drug names, and prescriptions; also offering students a basic knowledge of grammatical structures that they can develop during their further studies.

Grammar topics are reduced to a minimum that is sufficient for comprehending the specialized Latin terminology, i.e.:

  • a brief introduction to pronunciation and spelling
  • all five declinations together with exceptions for certain terms
  • declension and comparison of adjectives in a complete system
  • numerals
  • a brief review of verbs with orientation to the practical use of imperative and conjunctive moods in prescribing medicines
  • most frequently used prepositions
  • prefixes and suffixes

The whole course is focused not on teaching vocabulary through memorization, but to let students understand the principles of word formation.

Pathophysiology

This course discusses the mechanisms of various diseases of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, hematological, immunological, and endocrine systems on both the subcellular and cellular levels. This course provides insights into the disturbed physiological changes resulting from specific disease processes of individual organ systems. It also includes a study of immunological defense mechanisms, repair mechanisms, modes of injury, diseases of development and growth, blood disorders, and neoplasia. Selected problems of human genetics are reemphasized.

Lectures include relevant basic science material, examples of variations in structure and function, related symptoms and signs with common clinical scenarios and therapeutic approaches.

Pharmacology

This course covers the knowledge of the sources, biochemical and physiological effects, mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, as well as of the therapeutic and other beneficial uses of drugs.

Emphasis is placed on understanding the disposition, effects, efficacy, and relative toxicity of all major drug groups in the light of their biochemical and physiological mechanisms. The clinical aspects focus on a rational drug therapy. The use of drugs is analyzed with respect to pharmacologic principles, mechanisms of action, and pathophysiological abnormalities of the disease states.

Hygiene and Epidemiology

The central theme in this course is the importance of preventive medicine. In order to develop this concept, the course includes lectures and exercises in biostatistics, epidemiology, and public health. Laboratory sessions give students practical experience in solving public health problems. The impact of environmental factors on human health is also considered.

Biostatistics

This course introduces basic statistical methodologies including descriptive statistics, normal distribution, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals using the Z and t distributions, regression and correlation, chi-square, and other common nonparametric procedures. Statistical concepts are illustrated by appropriate biomedical applications.

Immunology

This course introduces students to the major principles and mechanisms involved in the function of the immune system. The lectures begin with the presentation of information related to anatomical and histological features of the reticuloendothelial system, humeral immunity, and cellular immunity. The course emphasizes the transposition of basic science information into clinical problems. The laboratory sessions summarize the diagnostic applications of immunological techniques.

Cell Biology

The course on cell biology focuses on the fundamental principles of cell function and structure, biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized by covering the gene structure and regulation as well as the protein structure and synthesis. There is a discussion of the ways in which these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are further integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. The course examines fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell biology at the molecular level with particular emphasis placed on biochemical approaches and mechanisms. Topics include: structure and function of the plasma membrane; transport of small molecules, ions, and macromolecular complexes across membranes; protein trafficking; the cytoskeleton, signal transduction pathways, and the control of cell division and cellular proliferation; the molecular nature of genes; gene function; the inheritance of genes; and the genetic basis of traits. Examples of disruptions to these processes occurring in human diseases are discussed throughout the course.

The course consists of an extensive practical part in the laboratory where students learn about the application of experimental techniques in cell culture, immune-histochemistry, and flow cytometry, and where they perform molecular procedures. Students spend most of their class time in the teaching laboratory practicing fundamental techniques, such as: maintaining cell in-vitro conditions, staining of tissue and specific compartments of the cell, affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, image cytometry analysis, PCR and recombinant DNA technology etc. In addition to learning the ways to perform these techniques safely, we want students to understand why these techniques work the way they do, and which scientific questions can be addressed with different techniques.

Behavioral Science

This course if focused on the psychology and physiology of life cycles. The general objectives are to describe the normal stages of human development and to discuss the psychological and physical factors affecting people in different periods of life.

The goal of the first part of the course is to give students the basic information concerning mental status examination, communication, interviewing, and the factors that may influence the doctor-patient relationship. The next set of seminars covers those aspects of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, and genetics that are related to psychiatry.

Semiotics

The course on semiotics is designed to teach the typical signs and symptoms of the most common disorders. Observation and proper interpretation of signs and symptoms determine to a large extent the success of a good diagnosis. During the course students meet patients with various diseases in the clinical wards and outpatient clinics, take their history, and evaluate the significance of performed observations. This course is designed to be an introduction to the basic internal medicine course offered in later years, and to facilitate the patient contact during students’ training sessions that involve patients.

Internal Medicine

This course introduces the principles of patient diagnosis in the clinical setting with the basic material presented in a series of lectures. Students are expected to develop both a logical approach to the diagnosis and treatment of patient complaints, as well as the technical skills which will enable them to take down a patient history and to perform a physical examination. Each student studies one or two patients per week and presents their cases on the teaching rounds. Then he/she follows these patients throughout their hospital stay, and finally writes a history of each patient’s disease, using the patient’s case as a basis for discussion. Student activities include rounds, consultations, laboratory sessions, specific diagnostic procedures, and treatment planning. Students also participate in outpatient clinics held by physicians. The training experience in this course emphasizes the clinical manifestations of various diseases in such areas as: cardiology, gastroenterology, hematology, nephrology, pulmonology, endocrinology, and nuclear medicine.

Pharmacology and Toxicology

The goal of this pharmacology and toxicology course is to provide students with knowledge of drugs that are useful in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases.

The course material will be delivered through lectures and seminars. The seminar content will focus on the subjects covered in lectures. During the seminars, students must be prepared to discuss corresponding topics covered in the lectures.

Emergency Medicine

The objective for this course is to provide students with general knowledge of emergency medicine and the Emergency Medical Systems (EMR), as well as of the basic standard procedures for pre-hospital rescue techniques used onsite of an emergency in the cases of accidents, natural disasters, and mass casualty events.

The course consists of 30 hours which take place at the Chair of Rescue Medicine, the Emergency Medicine Department, and at the Polish National Fire Fighters’ Unit.

Topics presented during the seminars and practical classes include:

  • pre-hospital management of a trauma patient
  • acute coronary syndrome
  • poly-traumatized patient
  • injuries to CNS (Central Nervous System)
  • interpretation of lab results
  • emergencies in children
  • analgesiosedation in emergency medicine

During a one-day visit to a fire fighting unit, students will have the opportunity to learn about the medical rescue techniques used by Polish fire fighters specializing in the search-and-rescue operations.

Disaster Medicine

This course consists of 20 hours of instruction and begins with a series of lectures that provide students with basic knowledge of such subjects as: definition of a disaster and disaster medicine, natural disasters, mass casualty events, and pre-hospital care organization for injured patients. During seminars students learn about hazardous materials and radiation accidents, environmental emergencies, terrorist attacks, toxicology, drug and medication overdoses, and infection control for the medical personnel.

Clinical Psychology

The objective of this course is to provide students with knowledge of the basic psychological paradigms, stress theories, coping styles, adjusting behaviors, and psychomatic medicine. The Department of Clinical Psychology provides students with the understanding of the patient as a whole in the process of coping with their disorders.

Instruction includes a developmental approach to the efforts of both the patient and the family in order for the patient to readjust, recover and return to health.

Students develop their skills to deepen their understanding of the nature of the disease-related stress and the emotional reactions to it. They will learn the protocols for communicating with patients, families, and other professionals. Specifically, they will gain the knowledge of the emotional reactions to the disease, ways of dealing with denial, breaking the bad news, collusion, and of responding to the difficult questions raised by the patient and the family members. Students will be expected to learn about the stages of human life and about the life span theories that explain the life crises occurring in the course of a human life.

History of Medicine

This course’s goal is to provide essential information on the history of medicine, and to present the full-span history of people’s struggle with their bodily infirmities. However, the objective of this course is also to demonstrate the development in different fields of medicine and the changes in the concepts of health and disease. The classes will take into consideration the biographies and achievements of famous scientists to help us understand how we are and where we are today with respect to all of the associated serious problems and controversies. This course is comprised of lectures and seminars.

Occupational Medicine

This course is focused on the diagnosis and treatment of human disease caused entirely or in part by a person’s work environment.

The causes of such diseases may have various aspects and nature including physical, chemical, biological, and neuro-psychological.

The following subjects are discussed during this course: occupational toxicology, physical hazards in the work environment, exposure of healthcare workers to hazards in the work environment, biological hazards, ergonomics, fatigue, localized fatigue, whole body fatigue, cumulative trauma disorders, and occupational risk factors associated with the development of lower back pain.

Students should develop a basic ability to recognize an occupational disease case.

Palliative Care

The palliative medicine course is designed to provide medical students with a holistic, palliative approach to the care of patients with advanced cancer and other malignant, incurable conditions including the end-of-life.

Students will become acquainted with the general philosophy of palliative hospice care principles and organization; symptom epidemiology; pathophysiology and management; ethical dilemmas; communication; family support; and the psychological, social, and spiritual problems in palliative care.

Laboratory Medicine

This course teaches medical students how and when to order laboratory tests in relation to the patient’s symptomology and/or disease, how to interpret these tests, and how to recognize their limitations. Clinical chemistry, clinical hematology, hemostasis, diagnostic immunology, and nuclear medicine are presented in lectures and laboratory sessions.

Pediatrics

The purpose of this clinical rotation is to help students understand the common disorders and diseases of childhood, especially their diagnosis, prevention, and management, including surgery when required. Emphasis is placed on the special needs of newborns. The rotation offers the opportunity to develop the necessary skills required in: taking a pediatric history, examining children of all ages, and in gaining experience in the assessment of the relevant clinical information. Based on which it is possible to formulate a plan of case management that is fully intelligible to the parents, and, if necessary to the child. Students learn history taking, physical examination procedures, as well as the principles of infant feeding, hydration, and drug therapy. Lectures provide students with the basic knowledge of normal physical and mental child development, as well as with the essential information pertaining to cardiac, gastrointestinal, neurological, hematological, immunological, and other types of childhood diseases.

Gynecology and Obstetrics

The goals of this rotation are to familiarize students with the knowledge of the clinical problems encountered in this area. Emphasis is placed on: obtaining experience in routine obstetric delivery, outpatient gynecologic case management of the different conditions; and on paying attention to the public health aspects as they relate to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, venereal diseases, cancer detection, and human sexuality.

Neonatology

The course objective is to provide a base of information concerning the pathology and physiology of newborn infants which is required of every physician.

Course components include: fetal physiology, adaptation to extrauterine life, care of a healthy newborn, breastfeeding, neonatal resuscitation, prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, congenital abnormalities, perinatal asphyxia, birth trauma, perinatal infections, elements of intensive care and mechanical ventilation, surgery in the newborn stage, chronic complications of prematurity, neurodevelopmental problems, and follow-up.

Psychiatry

This course introduces the care of psychiatric patients. Learning objectives are designed to increase students’ ability to recognize psychopathology, use effective interview techniques, make a correct diagnosis of psychiatric disorders, and understand the use of psychopharmacological agents. Students are taught ways to evaluate and manage psychiatric emergencies including substance abuse, ways to become more comfortable with psychiatric patients, and to fully understand the biological, psychological, and social determinants of their behavior. The history and results of the mental status examination are presented to the preceptor and later discussed. Students must attend ward rounds and outpatient office visits and counseling sessions.

Surgery

The main goal of this rotation is to acquaint students with those diseases or injuries that require surgical treatment. Emphasis is placed not on surgical techniques but on learning the pathophysiology of diseases, establishing the diagnosis, and on participating in patient treatments. Students are integrated into the clinical team and are assigned to specific patients. Each student’s responsibilities include: taking histories, performing physical examinations, and participating in patient management including — whenever possible — operative procedures. Attendance at daily physician rounds is mandatory in order to recognize the most common post-operative complications. Subspecialties of surgery include: traumatology, urology, gastroenterology, thoracic, neurosurgery, vascular, and cardiac.

Rheumatology I

The aim of this course is to learn about the:

  • etiopathogenesis of the most common rheumatic diseases
  • basic diagnostic methods in rheumatology
  • signs and symptoms of the most common diseases and their differential diagnostics
  • essentials of the treatment of rheumatic diseases

The course material is presented in the format of case demonstrations during seminars.

Rheumatology II

The goal of this course is to provide students with knowledge of selected aspects of rheumatology. Course material is presented during lectures, seminars, case demonstrations, and clinical classes. The following topics are covered throughout the course:

  • basic knowledge of pathophysiology, molecular biology, and genetics relevant to the most common autoimmune rheumatic conditions
  • basic knowledge of the most common rheumatic diseases including: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, polymyositis dermatomyositis, Sjogren’s syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, vascullitis, and poly-myalgia rheumatica — along with their etiology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical characteristics, natural history, and management
  • clinical skills such as taking history and performing clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal disorders
  • selection and interpretation of appropriate laboratory tests routinely used in rheumatology
  • understanding the indications, actions, and monitoring of drugs used in the treatment of rheumatic diseases

Allergology

The field of allergic diseases is a multidisciplinary specialty area and this course is provided by the Department of Dermatology and Allergic Diseases. The Diagnostic Center is going to focus on allergic skin disorders. However, we hope that this one-week course will cover both the basic and theoretical areas of allergic diseases.

The course objective is to provide basic knowledge of allergic diseases both from a theoretical perspective — etiopathogenesis, mechanisms, theories etc.; and from a practical standpoint — allergy diagnostic procedures, provocation tests, specific immunotherapy etc.

Cardiology

This course provides students with a fundamental knowledge of cardiology. The material is presented in seminars, clinical classes, and workshops. Students attend workshops in the ECHO, stress test, Holter monitoring, and thermodynamic laboratories.

Gastroenterology

The gastroenterology course takes place in the Department of Gastroenterology, Human Nutrition, and Internal Diseases.

Students work in the Gastroenterology ward with patients as well as in an outpatient clinic with patients referred by GPs to a gastroenterologist. In addition, students have the opportunity to participate in endoscopic procedures performed in the Endoscopy Unit — gastroscopy, colonoscopy, rectoscopy, ERCP etc.; and perform simple examinations such as rectal examinations.

During seminars students describe the most frequently observed gastrointestinal diseases.

In addition, students are assigned cases for presentations. Students work from patient case descriptions and perform the case analysis — including initial diagnosis, planning of additional examinations, differential diagnosis, and the final diagnosis. Students present their cases to the student group and the teaching staff, and answer questions as well as take part in the discussions following each presentation.

Nephrology

This course provides information about kidney diseases including: etiology, pathophysiology, diagnostics, and treatment. Students should have the knowledge of:

  • general physical patient examination
  • kidney anatomy and physiology
  • glomerular morphology and histology

Major nephrology topics discussed during lectures, case presentations, and training sessions in the wards are:

  • glomerulonephritis — etiology, diagnosis, clinical presentation, treatment, and morphological type
  • systemic diseases — etiology, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment
  • urinary tract infections — etiology, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment
  • autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease — etiology, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment
  • dialysis therapy — hemodialysis, intermittent peritoneal dialysis, and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis
  • renovascular hypertension

Pulmonology

The objective of this course as an integrated part of the Internal Medicine course is to provide students with basic information on the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory diseases. This rotation is designed to help students develop both a thorough understanding of and the clinical skills in gathering the patient information necessary to evaluate and manage common respiratory diseases.

Diabetology

This four-day course takes place at the Department of Internal Medicine and Diabetology. Students actively participate in seminars and small group work with the assistance of diabetology specialists.

Many topics are discussed in the seminars, e.g., the pathogenesis, classification, and treatment of diabetes, including oral agents and basic models of insulin therapy. Also covered are acute and chronic complications from the disease.

During the practical training sessions, students are presented with many cases of different diabetes types: type 1, type 2, type 3, and LADA. They encounter patients with both acute (mainly diabetic ketoacidosis) and chronic complications from diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy), and learn to suggest optimal treatment models.

Diabetology is an important subject area and the knowledge gained during this course will be useful to doctors in many different specialties.

Hypertension

During this course students learn to establish tentative diagnoses, ways to make a differential diagnosis with the use of well chosen accessory investigations, and ways to reach a final diagnosis. Students recognize the schema of the case report and other basic medical documents. The following major topics are discussed:

  • hypertension — definition and classification
  • epidemiology of hypertension
  • etiology and pathogenesis
  • secondary hypertension
  • etiology, diagnosis, and treatment
  • in-office blood pressure measurement
  • ambulatory BP measurement
  • diagnostic panel in hypertension
  • hypertensive urgencies and emergencies
  • treatment of hypertension – lifestyle changes and medication
  • special populations — with coexistent diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, angina pectoris, or hypertension in pregnancy
  • complications from hypertension
  • practical guidelines for hypertension management – JNC 7 and ESH
  • large clinical trials and why they are so important

Hematology

The course is conducted at the Hematology Department that is comprised of the Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantion Wards (with 60 beds), and at the Clinical Hematology Laboratory — in the biobank, molecular, cytogenetic, and flow cytometry labs.The course objective is to provide a base of information on blood disorders. This rotation deals with issues relevanant to all students regardless of their ultimate career choices, such as the relation of the basic sciences to the understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders, deficiency anemia, and the blood coagulation diseases. Special attention is given to the technical skills required of the modern physician like: bone marrow aspiration biopsy and trephine biopsy; ethical and moral principles; and the avoidance of pitfalls in the management of patients with malignancies. In particular, students will be expected to improve their history taking and performance of a thorough physical examination. Students will learn to think clearly about diseases in order to make an accurate diagnosis, plan a course of treatment, learn technical skills, and use the current literature that includes the medical index and hematological journals.

Nuclear Medicine

During the entire course students will learn about the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of radionuclides. The course is designed to show students what they may expect from the tests performed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine, and what are the main benefits and limitations of these diagnostic procedures. Also presented will be the indications for and contraindications to radionuclide therapy.

After completing the theoretical introduction to the basic methods students will be asked to evaluate patients referred to the department for diagnosis and treatment. Then, they will take part in the decision-making process of selecting the most appropriate method. They will observe the tests being performed, evaluate the results either with a computer or by reviewing previously prepared results, and interpret them clinically, by combining the gathered information with the patient’s history.

Clinical Pharmacology

Clinical Pharmacology is an integral part of pharmacology concerned with all clinical aspects of pharmacological treatment.

The main goals of clinical pharmacology — increased safety and efficacy of pharmacological treatment — are pursued through research and teaching.

The teaching of clinical pharmacology includes: pharmacokinetics; pharmacodynamics; adverse effects of drugs; monitoring of therapies; clinical trials with new agents; identification of the factors influencing drug action and their effects on the body — drug interactions, disease process, chronobiology, genotype, and environmental factors; and the social aspects of pharmacotherapy — pharmacoeconomics.

The curriculum focuses on clinical pharmacotherapy of cardiovascular disease, introduction to clinical pharmacogenetics, aspects of modern antibiotic use, and the basics of drug pharmacokinetics.

Family Medicine

This course introduces the main principles of family medicine. Seminars focus on the following topics: different models of general practice in Ireland, Scotland, and Poland; doctor-patient communication; the clinical approach in general practice; health education and promotion; home care; the cooperation between GPs and other elements of the national health systems; and the structure of general practice. Students participate in the daily activities of family doctors in their practice, at the ratio of one student per tutor.

Also presented are the various types of equipment, including computer programs, used in general practice.

Internal Medicine in Primary Care

The course curriculum highlights the skills necessary for recognizing and addressing the common problems in the area of internal medicine in primary medical care. During seminars, the management of, e.g., arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, acute infections, chronic diseases of the respiratory tract, and metabolic disturbances in primary care are discussed. The practical sessions are conducted in a general practitioner’s office in groups of two students. They will participate in the everyday routine of a primary care physician’s work including: taking an interview, examining, diagnosing, and treating common illnesses. Students have the opportunity to perform some procedures, such as electrocardiography, blood glucose level testing, and giving intramuscular injections. During the course some particularly interesting clinical cases will be presented and discussed.

Clinical Genetics

This course educates a physician of any specialty to be prepared for working with geneticists and with genetic outpatient clinics. During the course students should develop the understanding of the role of genetics in medicine. They should gain the basic knowledge of the structure and behavior of chromosomes and genes, the organization of the human genome, and gene mapping. They will learn about major types of genetic diseases and the mechanism of their inheritance; diagnostics – pedigree analysis, cyto-genetics, and molecular genetics; differentiation counseling; and about possible treatments. They are also taught about the molecular genetic bases of human physiological traits, e.g., sex determination, and diseases — including cancer.

Infectious Diseases

This clinical rotation provides students with the opportunity to learn about the etiology, symptoms, and treatment of various infectious diseases in children and adults. Special attention is given to AIDS and viral hepatitis. Students take histories, perform physical examinations, and present data during rounds. They also review the current techniques of laboratory investigation and the use of antimicrobial agents.

Neurology

This course presents the natural history of common neurological diseases and the diagnosis and management of these disorders. Students attend daily rounds with neurologists and participate in consultations. The learning objectives are to increase students’ ability to recognize neuropathology, to examine the patient correctly, and to use appropriate therapy. Lectures and seminars provide students with the indications for and the value of the EEG, CT, angiography, and NMR procedures.

Radiology

This course focuses on lectures and seminars illustrated with extensive teaching and active case files. In addition to a routine x-ray examination, each student learns the principles of ultrasonography, computer tomography, angio- and cardiography, and nuclear medicine, including NMR imaging. Each student group assisted by a staff member covers the basic principles of interpreting chest, abdominal, and bone radiographs by the observation and discussion of current cases. Every student is required to observe special procedures and to attend all departmental teaching conferences.

Oncology

This course summarizes the knowledge of malignant diseases obtained by students during specific clinical rotations and courses in pathology, pediatrics, internal medicine, surgery etc. Students participate in physical examinations and discuss metastasis and proliferation of the disease. They also have an opportunity to learn about the treatment and care of terminally ill patients.

Forensic Medicine

This course introduces forensic aspects of medical practice. Lectures and seminars present problems of sero-hematology, drug and chemical intoxication, and parenthood and its identification. Students have the opportunity to participate in forensic autopsies and thus get some experience in the assessment of specific injuries — gunshot wounds, penetration injuries, intoxication, and others.

Laryngology

During this clinical rotation students learn the principles of symptomology and the treatment of most common diseases related to ears, nose, throat, larynx, and esophagus. Students participate in the evaluation and treatment of outpatient clinics and hospital patients in the wards. The lectures and seminars include the relevant basic scientific material related to specific pathologies such as malignant diseases, inflammatory processes, and trauma of the upper respiratory tract and esophagus.

Tropical Diseases

The clinical parasitology course is the continuation of the basic parasitology course covered in the microbiology course. It constitutes an essential part of the infectious and parasitic diseases course. The tropical diseases course has been arranged in order to keep balance between theoretical knowledge and practical skills. It focuses on some selected syndromes and diseases that we recognize as most relevant to a future general practitioner.

Orthopedics

Students are introduced to the many facets of orthopedics: identification of fractures, management of late complications, casting techniques, and reconstructive surgery. Students prepare case histories and perform physical examinations, go on rounds, follow their patients to the operating room and throughout the postoperative care and rehabilitation.

Rehabilitation

This course teaches students the understanding of the patient as a whole. It fosters the development of habits that will make clinical education a continuous, lifelong process, and it points out the ways of preventing degenerative diseases. The course focuses on issues relevant to all students irrespective of their ultimate career choice: the correspondence/relation/relationship of the basic sciences to the understanding of pathophysiology; diagnosis and management of patients with disability; day-to-day management of patients with partial or whole body impairments; a representative knowledge of the broad spectrum of rehabilitation problems; the technical skills required of the modern physician; the effective use of the scientific methods; the importance of sound ethical and moral principles; and the avoidance of pitfalls in the management of disabled patients.

Ophthalmology

Lectures, seminars, and clinical rotations acquaint students with the major ocular disorders in a manner that will interest primarily the candidates for general practice areas. This course covers the practical clinical aspects and the related mechanisms underlying various disorders such as: diseases of the retina and choroid, glaucoma, corneal trauma, cataracts etc. Emphasis is placed on obtaining experience in a careful examination of and first aid in post-traumatic cases.

Anesthesiology and Resuscitation

During this rotation students become familiar with the techniques and principles of intubation and the use of intravenous, arterial, central venous pressure, and of the Swan-Ganz catheters. Students also learn about: the problems occurring in postoperative and intensive care units, the pharmacology of the common anesthetic agents in the operating room, the principles of administering general and local anesthesia, and about the management of the anesthetized patient.

Dermatology

This clinical rotation helps students learn the symptomatology of most common skin diseases. During lectures and clinical presentations students learn the ways to recognize and differentiate various primary and secondary skin changes, and the ways to use specific external and internal treatments. Students are also introduced to the evaluation and treatment of venereal disease cases.

Introduction to Dentistry

This course presents the basic surgical issues of the oral and facial areas. In seminars students will learn about the symptoms of maxillofacial traumas including their diagnosis and treatment. Two seminars will focus on the diagnostic issues in benign and malignant tumors of the oral cavity and the maxillofacial area, as well as on the surgical treatment of tumors and metastatic lymph nodes. Also presented will be the possibility of reconstructions in some defects. The important part of the maxillofacial surgery is the surgical treatment of facial and orthognatic anomalies. Finally, the aspects of infections and inflammations in the orofacial region will be discussed. During the course some patient case presentations will illustrate the principles of diagnostics and treatment.

Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology

The main objective of this course is to present the specific features of the medical problems in the elderly, e.g., polipathology, politherapy, the nonspecific or unusual symptoms, and the geriatric giants. During the course students will learn how to approach and solve the medical problems present in elderly patients, within the framework of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging.

Biochemistry

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. The rules of occupational health and safety in a biochemistry lab.
  2. Structure, properties, and nomenclature of biological compounds: carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins and enzymes, fats, nucleic acids, vitamins and hormones.
  3. Biological significance of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins.
    Organization of genetic information. Mutations and mutagenic agents.
  4. The activity of the enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract.
  5. The characteristics and function of biological membranes and their role in the organization of intracellular metabolic processes, the relationship between the structures of cells and their functions.
  6. The basics of biochemical processes occurring in the human body. Body fluids

 

Practicals:

  1. The reactions of simple and complex carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins.
  2. The composition of a proper human diet, energy balance.
  3. The location of the metabolic pathways in the cell (main processes of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and nucleotides – hormone regulation). Catabolic and anabolic processes. Biological oxidation Bioenergetics as a system of integrated endoergic and exoergic reactions. The use of energy sources.
  4. Biochemical laboratory diagnostics. The reference values of the compounds found in blood and urine
  5. The water and electrolyte balance, acid-base balance

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student knows the rules of occupational health and safety in a biochemistry lab.
  2. The student knows the structure, properties, and nomenclature of biological compounds: carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins and enzymes, fats, nucleic acids, vitamins and hormones.
  3. The student understands the biological significance of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins. The student knows the reactions of simple and complex carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins.
  4. The student has knowledge of the organization of genetic information, mutations and mutagenic factors.
  5. The student has knowledge of the enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract.
  6. The student knows the characteristics and function of biological membranes and their role in the organization of intracellular metabolic processes, and the relationship between the structures of cells and their functions.
  7. The student has basic knowledge of biochemical processes in the human body.
  8. The student can name the components of a proper human diet, taking into account the energy balance.
  9. The student has knowledge of body fluids. The student knows the reference values of the compounds found in blood and urine.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

 

Biophysics

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Biophysics of the circulatory system. Types of flows. The continuity equation for fluids. The influence of hydrostatic pressure on the human body.
  2. A detailed discussion of the characteristics of mechanical waves and mechanism of their formation. Active and passive effect of mechanical waves on the human body. The Doppler effect.
  3. A detailed discussion of the effects of factors such as temperature, humidity, acceleration and ionizing radiation on the human body. Referring a problem to physiotherapeutic issues.

 

Practicals:

  1. Mechanobiology on the cellular level and mechanical properties of the tissues of the biomechanical system. General overview of the problem in relation to physiotherapy and rehabilitation.
  2. Structure of the tissues of the biomechanical system from the perspective of biomechanics. General presentation of the problem: the man as a bio-machine in the context of biomechanical systems.
  3. General information about the physical and chemical structure and physical properties of biological membranes.
  4. General information concerning the organization of the cell membrane, the fluidity with respect to environmental factors. Membrane transport and building of the membrane capacity. The use of the phenomenon in physiotherapeutic practice.
  5. Exercises/Self-education: Becoming acquainted with the sources of the laser light. Detailed discussion of the operating principle and types of lasers. The biological effect of the laser on tissues. The use of laser light in physical therapy.
  6. Exercises/Self-education: General information on the function and structure of the hearing and sight organs. The principles of transduction of sound signals and image conversion in the relevant organs of the human body. Becoming acquainted with the use of sound waves in imaging and physiotherapy treatments.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student knows the structure and mechanical properties of tissues of the musculoskeletal system;
  2. The student knows the types of forces acting on the biomechanical system and understands how they influence the development of the mechanical strength of tissues.
  3. The student can describe the structure of biological membranes and specify their physicochemical properties, as well as foresee the effect of changing environmental conditions of the cells.
  4. The student knows the principles of the membrane transport and knows how the membrane potential is built.
  5. The student knows the rules for performing functional examinations that are necessary for the choice of means in physiotherapy.
  6. The student can describe the types of sound waves used in imaging and physiotherapy treatments.
  7. The student knows the basic laws describing the blood flow in the blood vessels.
  8. The student knows how hydrostatic pressure affects the human body.
  9. The student knows the physical characteristics of mechanical waves and the mechanism of their formation, as well as their active and passive effect on the human body.
  10. The student knows the biological effects of factors such as temperature, humidity, acceleration and ionizing radiation.
  11. The student knows the design and operation of the laser. The student knows how lasers are used in physical therapy and their biological effect in the tissues.
  12. The student can indicate how the biomechanical strength of the tissue will change due to changes in the content of individual building elements and changes in the structure under the influence of biological and mechanical stimuli.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Ethics and Deontology

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Basic concepts of bioethics as a scientific discipline. Basic bioethical attitudes.
  2. Discussion, becoming acquainted with and identifying an ethical problem that can be encountered in the practice of medicine
  3. Becoming acquainted with sources of morality
  4. Developing an attitude of understanding towards basic ethical concepts (utilitarian, personalistic and deontological justification); and identification of professional ethics.
  5. Developing the skill of adopting an attitude towards an ethical dilemma. Identifying culturally conditioned factors of an ethical dilemma. A detailed discussion of the relevance of an ethical dilemma as the conflict of different roles, different practices and values which govern them.
  6. Discussion of bioethical dilemmas: abortion, euthanasia


Learning outcomes

  1. Has elementary knowledge of key concepts and attitudes in bioethics
  2. The student can identify ethical problem and attempt to adopt a position towards an ethical dilemma
  3. The student understands the importance of differences in the concepts of morality, ethics and bioethics in practical and cultural context

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

First Aid

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Discussion of the chain of survival
  2. The use of practical knowledge about the chain of survival
  3. Detailed discussion of principles for basic life support, a detailed discussion of guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Referring the guidelines with the division into adults and children
  4. Practical use of knowledge of the guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, performing BLS

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has knowledge of chain of survival. The student can put the knowledge into practice.
  2. The student can use the knowledge of CPR and BLS into practice.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Fundamentals of Computer Science

Curriculum content:

  1. Software used for data analysis (STATISTICA)
  2. Interpretation of data: quantitative and qualitative data
  3. Descriptive statistics
  4. Confidence intervals
  5. Verification of hypotheses

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student knows the software used for data analysis (STATISTICA)
  2. The student can interpret data: quantitative and qualitative data
  3. The student has knowledge of descriptive statistics
  4. The student can use proper confidence intervals
  5. The student can verify hypotheses

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Gross Anatomy

Curriculum content:

Lectures:

  1. Detailed information about the skeletal and muscular system
  2. Detailed information about the nervous system
  3. Sensory organs
  4. Skin
  5. Information about the circulatory system
  6. Information about the lymphatic system
  7. General information about the respiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital and endocrine system

Practicals:

  1. Bone structure, types of bones and connections. Muscles – macroscopic structure, types of muscles. The topographic division of muscles, insertions, functions and innervation. Fascia.
  2. Functional anatomy (muscular activity in subgroups):
  • names of movements in the joints
  • upper limb
  • lower limb
  • thorax
  • head
  1. The division of the nervous system. Peripheral nervous system: types of nerve fibers, tangles, spinal nerves, cranial nerves. The division of the central nervous system. Detailed structure of the spinal cord and brain. Reticular formation. The limbic system. The autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic system, nerve centers, cerebral ganglia.
  2. The sight organ (the eye).
  3. The vestibulocochlear organ.
  4. Skin receptors.
  5. The circulatory system. The structure of the heart. The topography of the heart. General structure of systemic and pulmonary circulation. The system of blood vessels.
  6. The lymphatic system and spleen, thymus. The system of lymphatic vessels. Lymph nodes.
  7. General structure of the pulmonary tract and lungs. The topography of the lungs. The gastrointestinal system, the division and the overall structure of individual sections of the gastrointestinal system. The urogenital system. The structure of the kidneys and urinary tract. Male and female genitals.

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has detailed knowledge of anatomy and functioning of the human movement apparatus.
  2. The student has detailed knowledge of anatomy and functioning of the human nervous system.
  3. The student is able to demonstrate his/her knowledge of the anatomy of the respiratory, digestive, excretory and endocrine system, as well as sense organs.
  4. The student has detailed knowledge of the anatomy and functioning of the human lymphatic system.
  5. The student is able to demonstrate his/her knowledge of the structure and functioning of the respiratory system.
  6. The student is able to demonstrate his/her knowledge of the structure and functioning of the sense organs and skin.

Assessment method: Exam and credit from particular exercises. Practical exam from the skeletal and muscular part.

Health Promotion and Health Care

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Definition and scope of preventive health care, health promotion and health education, phases of preventive health care
  2. The main determinants of health
  3. The concept of salutogenesis by Aaron Antonovsky
  4. Key assumptions of the National Health Programme
  5. Healthy School, Healthy Hospital and Healthy City programs as examples of of habitat programs
  6. Examples of health promoting activities for different aspects of obesity

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student understands the definition and scope of preventive health care, health promotion and health education.
  2. The student can list the main determinants of health.
  3. The student knows the key assumptions of National Health Programme
  4. The student can describe the following programs: Healthy School, Healthy Hospital and Healthy City programs as examples of of habitat programs
  5. The student knows the concept of salutogenesis
  6. The student can name examples of health promoting activities in, among others, different aspects of obesity.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Intensive Care

Curriculum content:

  1. General presentation of selected life-threatening conditions associated with the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system and polytrauma.
  2. Practical use of knowledge of the selected life-threatening conditions associated with the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system and polytrauma.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has knowledge of selected life-threatening conditions associated with the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system and polytrauma.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Fundamentals of Medical Physiotherapy

Curriculum content:

  1. General information on therapeutic exercises in diseases of the musculoskeletal system.
  2. Detailed rules for conducting individual and group gymnastics. Main differences and indications for use.
  3. Discussion of main indications and contraindications for therapeutic exercises of the musculoskeletal system.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student knows rules for conducting individual and group gymnastics
  2. The student knows basic main indications and contraindications for individual and group gymnastics.
  3. The student can independently conduct individual gymnastics in the indicated disease entities
  4. The student can make an appropriate selection of exercises and apply appropriate rate for the exercises, taking into account their duration.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Kinesiology

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Detailed information on human psychomotoricity, its terminology and classification. The concept of psychomotoricity in ontogenesis. Physiologic and psychomotoric conditions of psychomotoricity.
  2. Detailed information on the assessment of the correct human posture and motor skills.

Practicals:

  1. Work on human movement. Detailed information about the indications and contraindications for the use of movement in humans.
  2. Detailed information about the muscle functions and the nervous system in motion. Reference to the physiological state and pathology of motion.
  3. Detailed discussion of human motoricity in terms of speed, endurance, strength.
  4. Detailed information concerning the analysis of simple and complex human movements. The analysis of locomotor movements and of movement in the joints.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has knowledge of human locomotor activity and in the field of kinesiology.
  2. The student has knowledge of anthropometry. The student has knowledge of body posture and its control.
  3. The student has knowledge of functional analysis of simple and complex human movements.
  4. The student has knowledge of movement analysis in the joints and human locomotor movements.
  5. The student has knowledge of different ways of movement therapy.
  6. The student can use the knowledge of the human locomotor activity while working with patients.
  7. The student can independently make anthropometric measurements. The student can assess body posture.
  8. The student can perform an analysis of simple and complex human movements.
  9. Uses the correct description of human locomotor movements. By applying various forms of activity, can develop the patient’s motor skills.

 

Assessment method: exam

Latin

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. The general Latin terminology of musculoskeletal diseases and their symptoms
  2. The Latin nomenclature of connective tissue diseases and their symptoms
  3. The Latin nomenclature of orthopaedic dysfunctions and their symptoms
  4. The Latin nomenclature of neurological diseases of children and adults

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student uses the Latin nomenclature associated with movement disorders
  2. The student uses the Latin vocabulary associated with connective tissue diseases
  3. The student uses the Latin vocabulary associated with orthopaedic dysfunctions.
  4. The student uses the Latin vocabulary associated with neurological diseases.

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Medical Biology

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Structure and function of eukaryotic cells. Cell signaling, function and types of cellular receptors. The divisions and types of cell death. The characteristics and types of stem cells.
  2. The structure and function of the connective tissue
  3. The structure and function of the epithelial tissue

 

Practicals:

  1. Detailed information:       The structure and function of nerve cells and glial cells, the organization of the central and peripheral nervous system, primary neurodegenerative processes and mechanisms of axonal regeneration
  2. Detailed information: types of muscle cells, the construction of skeletal muscle cells, sarcomeres, the regeneration process of the muscle cells, the mechanism of skeletal and smooth muscle contraction
  3. The structure of the bone tissue cells and the process of their differentiation, the structure of the compact and cancellous bone tissue and the process of its reconstruction, the structure of periosteum and endosteum
  4. General information: The histological structure and function of epithelial cells and muscle layer of the respiratory organs and their secretory functions
  5. General information: the histological structure and functions: salivary glands, oesophagus, stomach and intestines, and pancreas and liver
  6. General information: the operating principles of optical and fluorescence microscopes

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has knowledge of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells.
  2. The student has detailed knowledge of the structure and function of the connective tissue
  3. The student is able to demonstrate knowledge on the structure and function of the epithelial tissue
  4. The student has detailed knowledge of the structure and function of nerve and muscle cells
  5. The student has general knowledge of the histological structure and function of the tissues of the respiratory and digestive system
  6. The student has knowledge on the operating principles of optical and fluorescence microscopes

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Pedagogy

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Special pedagogy and its sub-disciplines, basic terminology, the relationship between physiotherapy and special pedagogy
  2. Characterizing patients based on different criteria (blind and partially sighted, deaf, mentally disabled, chronically ill, patients with reduced mobility, children with learning difficulties, socially maladjusted persons)
  3. The problem of cooperation with the family or legal guardian of the patient, conditions of the effectiveness of interactions between the physiotherapist and the patient and family.
  4. Principles and methods of work with patients requiring special education, revalidation, re-education, rehabilitation possibilities

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student can define special pedagogy and list its sub-disciplines
  2. The student understands the problem of cooperation with the family or legal guardian of the patient, conditions of the effectiveness of interactions between the physiotherapist and the patient and family.
  3. The student knows the principles and methods of work with patients requiring special education, revalidation, re-education, rehabilitation possibilities
  4. The student can characterize patients based on different criteria (blind and partially sighted, deaf, mentally disabled, chronically ill, patients with reduced mobility, children with learning difficulties, socially maladjusted persons)

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Philosophy

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. The specificity of philosophy as a research discipline
  2. Branches of philosophy, the basic question of philosophy, classical research problems and attitude towards them
  3. The origins of Greek philosophy – the formation of the basic philosophical questions in the Ionian, Pythagorean and Elean school of philosophy Plato, Democritus and Aristotle as examples of paradigmatic attitudes towards credibility of cognition and understanding of being
  4. Augustine and Thomas Aquinas, two attitudes towards the possibility of knowing God
  5. Hobbes and Descartes as representatives of attitudes towards the question about the essence of man
  6. Hobbes and Descartes as representatives of attitudes towards the question about the essence of man
  7. Comte, Bergson and Husserl as the representatives of various attitudes towards the role of science
  8. Maritain, Guardini, Wojtyla – personalism

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has knowledge of philosophy as a research discipline
  2. The student knows branches of philosophy, the basic question of philosophy, classical research problems and attitude towards them
  3. The student has basic knowledge of the beginnings of philosophy in Greece
  4. The student can present the attitudes of Augustine and Thomas Aquinas
  5. The student knows the figures of Descartes and Hobbes
  6. The student can describe different attitude towards the role of science
  7. The student has knowledge of personalism in philosophy

 

Assessment method: exam

Physiology

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. The essence of vital functions
  2. Higher nervous functions
  3. Physiology of the autonomic system
  4. Physiology of the skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscle
  5. Perception
  6. Physiology of the cardiovascular system and blood
  7. Reproductive physiology
  8. Physiology of the respiratory system

Practicals:

  1. Basics of the exercise physiology
  2. Neurohormonal regulation of life processes, electrophysiological processes
  3. Thyroid hormones. Mineralocorticoids. RAAS. Glucocorticosteroids. Adrenal androgens. Catecholamines. Physiology of the parathyroid glands. Hormones of the calcium-phosphate balance.
  4. Thermal regulation
  5. Neurophysiological basis of human behavior. Motivational centers in the hypothalamus.
  6. The structure and role of the limbic system.
  7. Short-term and permanent memory. Conditioned reflexes, learning.
  8. The activity of the brain, physiology of sleep and wakefulness
  9. The organization of autonomic system – the sympathetic parasympathetic and intestinal part, visceral-sensory neurons.
  10. The receptors of the autonomic nervous system – the division due to: the type of transmitter, the second messenger system, the effects induced in the cell. Regulation of the number of receptors. Denervation hypersensitivity The antagonism between the sympathetic and parasympathetic system.
  11. The reflexes the autonomic nervous system. The study of neurological reflexes.
  12. Muscle tension. Maintenance and regulation of muscle tension.
  13. Motor unit.
  14. The division of skeletal muscles. Types of skeletal muscle contractions.
  15. Energy sources of the working muscles.
  16. Smooth muscles – classification, the mechanism of contraction. Plasticity of the smooth muscles.
  17. Dynamometry
  18. The sense of hearing. Hearing tests – objective and subjective methods.
  19. The sight organ (the eye) The optical properties of the eye. Refractive errors. The retina. Creating an image on the retina. Color blindness. The examination of the eye: visual acuity and color vision testing.
  20. The sense of balance. The receptors of the organ of balance. Nystagmus. The methods of balance testing.
  21. The sense of taste. Taste receptors Flavour types. The sense of smell. Olfactory receptors. Stimulation of the olfactory receptors.
  22. Division of the cardiovascular system – anatomical and functional division. Peripheral circulation.
  23. The importance of the elastic arteries in maintaining blood flow. The importance of the muscular arteries in blood distribution.
  24. Regulation of blood flow – local and humoral.
  25. Physiology of the blood. Blood cell counts. Interpretation of the basic parameters of peripheral blood counts
  26. Endocrine activity associated with reproduction. The function of the hypothalamic-pituitary system in the regulation of reproduction.
  27. Reproductive physiology and function of the ovary; ovulation and the ovulation mechanism, function of the corpus luteum. Hormonal function of the ovary: sex steroids, ovarian peptides.
  28. Biological and systemic effect of the androgens. Changes in male hormone levels.
  29. Embryogenesis
  30. The functions of the respiratory system.
  31. Respiratory muscles. Breathing resistance. Ventilation. Lung compliance. The role of the surfactant. Gas exchange in the lungs. Regulation of breathing.

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has knowledge of neurohormonal regulation of life processes and electrophysiological processes, as well as of thermal regulation.
  2. The student has knowledge of functioning of the higher functions of the central nervous system
  3. The student has knowledge of the limbic system
  4. The student has knowledge of learning process and the memory
  5. The student has knowledge of the division and functioning of the autonomic system, the organization of the system b) The student has knowledge about the receptors of the autonomic nervous system – the division due to: the type of transmitter, second messenger system, the effects induced in the cell. Regulation of the number of receptors. Denervation hypersensitivity
  6. The student has knowledge of autonomic reflexes of the nervous system. The study of neurological reflexes.
  7. The student has knowledge of the physiology of the skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscles
  8. The student has knowledge of perception, as well as the methods of examining the sense organs
  9. The student has knowledge of the cardiovascular system and the physiology of blood
  10. The student has knowledge of embryogenesis and reproductive physiology
  11. The student has knowledge of the respiratory system
  12. The student has knowledge of the brain activity, sleep and wakefulness

Assessment method: exam

Sociology

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Man as a social being: socialization and personalities. Sociology of social groups. Sociology of the family
  2. The cultural basis of social life: the essence and importance of culture for the perception of health, illness, disability, old age and death;
  3. The social model of health
  4. Sociology of deviation: social determinants of deviation; social control; disability as social deviation; social labelling of the sick; the power of stigma
  5. Sociology of institutions: the models of hospital care; the impact of social factors on the healing process; stress in the conditions of a hospital ward; staff-patient communication; problems in patient-staff interactions and ways to improve them

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student can characterize the man as a social being
  2. The student has knowledge of cultural bases of social life
  3. The student can describe the social model of health
  4. The student can describe disability as social deviation; social labelling of the sick
  5. The student can describe the hospital as an institution, the impact of social factors on the healing process; stress in the conditions of a hospital ward; staff-patient communication; problems in patient-staff interactions and ways to improve them

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Therapeutic Massage

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Discussion of the rules of conduct in therapeutic massage.
  2. The problem in reference to selected disease entities.
  3. Indications and contraindications for massage in particular diseases.
  4. Methodology of massaging.

Practicals:

  1. Detailed discussion of the principles of preparing a patient for a massage.
  2. Discussing the adjustment strength, pace, time, and rhythm to the treatment performed in all positions used in a given disease entity.
  3. Detailed discussion and practical improvement of all therapeutic massage techniques used in disease entities.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has basic knowledge of massage in diseases.
  2. The student knows indications and contraindications for a massage in a given disease.
  3. The student knows the methodology of therapeutic massaging.
  4. The student can independently perform massage techniques used in indicated diseases.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Functional Development of Human

Curriculum content:

Seminars:

  1. Psychomotor development of the child. Stages of development. Time of acquiring motor skills.

 

Practicals:

  1. Functional assessment of a healthy child. The objectives of its application. Assessment methods of psychomotor development of a child.
  2. Functional assessment of a child with disabilities. The objectives of its application. Methods for assessing developmental changes, forecasting movement abilities.
  3. Functional assessment of gross and fine motor skills.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. The student can describe the psychomotor development of a child and the stages of development.
  2. The student can carry out a functional assessment of a healthy child. The student knows the assessment methods of psychomotor development of a child.
  3. The student can carry out an assessment of a child with disabilities.
  4. The student can assess gross and fine motor skills of a child.
  5. The student can assess gross and fine motor skills of an adult.

 

Assessment method: credit with a grade

History of Medicine and Physiotherapy

Upon completing this course students will be ready to place the current medical issues in a wider historical perspective. Specifically, they should be able to:

  • discuss the problems of cultural and historical relativity of health and disease
  • understand the origins of contemporary biomedical knowledge
  • give an overview of the history of physiotherapy and of the various areas of medical specialty
  • place the past and present medical practices in the social, political, economic, technological, and ethical contexts

Medical Electrodiagnostics in Physiotherapy

Curriculum content:

  1. Discussing indications to perform examinations in the field of medical electrodiagnostics.
  2. Discussing electromyographic examination and its applications.
  3. Discussing electroencephalographic examination and its applications.
  4. Discussing electroneurographic examination and its applications.
  5. Presenting and discussing results of examinations in the field of medical electrodiagnostics.
  6. Discussing indications for imaging tests.
  7. Discussing MRI examination and its applications.
  8. Discussing computed tomography and its applications.
  9. Discussing ultrasound examination and its applications.
  10. Presentation and discussing the results of imaging tests.

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student knows indications for imaging tests.
  2. The student can name the applications of an MRI examination.
  3. The student can name the applications of a computed tomography examination.
  4. The student can name the applications of an ultrasound examination.
  5. The student knows indications for imaging tests.
  6. The student can name the applications of an electromyographic examination.
  7. The student can name the applications of an electroencephalographic examination.
  8. The student can name the applications of an electroneurographic examination.

 

Assessment method: credit

Corrective Physical Exercises

Curriculum content:

  1. Posture in ontogenesis
  2. Faulty posture
  3. Body posture in children in different disease entities
  4. Methods of faulty posture therapy
  5. Presentation of therapy according to the different concepts of physiotherapy faulty posture

Learning outcomes:

1 The student can discuss posture in ontogenesis

2 The student can discuss what are the possible deviations from the correct body posture.

3 The student knows the specifics of body posture in children in different disease entities

4 The student knows the ways and methods of therapy faulty posture

5 The student can present methods of therapy according to the different concepts of physiotherapy faulty posture

Assessment method: credit

Rescue and Disaster Medicine

Curriculum content:

  1. Legal and organizational aspects of the functioning of the emergency medical services.
  2. Disaster Medicine – definitions, divisions, organization of medical support, interoperability of units, triage.
  3. The problems of psychotraumatology and psychological first aid.
  4. First Aid – first aid rules, equipment, cooperation with emergency services.

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student knows the operating principles of emergency services.
  2. The student knows the problems related to disasters and disaster medicine.
  3. The student knows the rules for first aid, especially during mass incidents.
  4. The students knows the rules of providing psychological first aid.
  5. The student can provide first aid.
  6. The student can cooperate with emergency services.
  7. The student can recognize psychological threats and react to them.

 

Assessment method: credit

Methodology of Motor Training

Curriculum content:

  1. Methodology of motor teaching as a field of science.
  2. Indications, planning, organizing and conducting exercises in rehabilitation in the station system.
  3. Methodology of motor teaching.
  4. Skills and tools of a motor teacher.
  5. The Halliwick Concept.
  6. Modern forms of movement exercises.
  7. Movement exercises in various types of disability.
  8. Forms and rules of motor teaching.
  9. Planning and preparation of physical activities.
  10. The development of a motor habit.
  11. The process of teaching motor functions.
  12. Suggesting the outline as the basic tool in future work.
  13. The division of gymnastic exercises.
  14. Shaping exercises. Exercises of upper limbs.
  15. Forms of running classes.
  16. Exercises of the torso in all planes.
  17. Utilitarian sports exercises: utilitarian, focused on agility and acrobatic.
  18. Means of shaping motor skills: strength, speed, endurance.
  19. Means of shaping motor skills: agility, dexterity, balance, motor coordination and jumping ability. Flexibility as human morphofunctional characteristic.

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student can list therapeutic exercises, knows the rules for improvement procedures in persons with diseases and malfunctions, according to their clinical and functional condition.
  2. Describes and interprets theoretical bases for techniques and methodologies for therapeutic improvement.
  3. The student can list the developmental aspects of human movement in different aspects of learning and teaching the movements, using various forms for activity in teaching the movements and controlling the process by mastering the movements.
  4. The student can describe and explain the methodology of movement teaching.
  5. The student can plan physical activities in movement teaching and planning and controlling the process of mastering movement skills.
  6. The student can give advice on lifestyle and procedures in states of irreversible malfunctions or chronic diseases in patients.
  7. The student can plan and carry out an individual rehabilitation plan for a patient.
  8. The student has knowledge of the teaching process of motor actions.
  9. The student has knowledge of the phases of development of a motor habit, types and divisions of shaping exercises and the methods of recording them.
  10. The student knowledge of the forms of running movement classes.
  11. The student has knowledge of utilitarian exercises and their application in the rehabilitation process.
  12. The student has knowledge of the motor skills: strength, speed, endurance.
  13. The student has knowledge of the motor skills: agility, dexterity, balance, motor coordination and jumping ability. The student has knowledge of flexibility as human morphofunctional characteristic.
  14. The student has knowledge of the supplementary exercised used.
  15. The student can independently write an outline of motor classes as the basic form of preparation of a physiotherapist for working with a patient.
  16. The student can properly choose exercises and methods of work with a patient to develop a motor habit. The student can choose starting positions for exercises depending on the objectives. The student can use correct terminology related to the types of movement and shoulder exercises.
  17. The student can choose starting positions for exercises depending on the objectives. The student has learned correct terminology related to the types of movement of lower limbs and the torso in various planes.

Assessment method: exam

Physical Therapy (Hydrotherapy, Electrotherapy, Magneto-, Light, Laser Therapy)

Curriculum content:

Hydrotherapy:

  1. The theoretical basis of hydrotherapy. The influence of the aquatic environment the human body.

– mechanical and physiological factors acting on the body in an aqueous medium,

– the principles of therapeutic exercise in water and hydrotherapy treatments,

– the division of hydrotherapy treatments.

  1. Indications and contraindications for the use of therapy in water and hydrotherapy treatments.

 

  1. Methods of performing basic therapeutic exercises in the aquatic environment and hydrotherapy treatments.

 

  1. Examples of using exercise in the aquatic environment and hydrotherapy treatments in patients with disorders of the organ system.

Electrotherapy:

  1. Basic concepts of electrotherapy and stimuli acting the human body during physical treatments.
  2. Treatments using DC and low-frequency currents.
  3. Treatments using medium and high-frequency currents.
  4. Methods of performing galvanization and iontophoresis.
  5. Methods of performing electrostimulation.
  6. Methods of performing treatments using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation
  7. Methods of performing treatments using diadynamic currents.
  8. Methods of performing treatments using interference currents.
  9. Methods of performing shortwave diathermy and Terapuls.

Thermo-, laser- and magnetotherapy

  1. Physical and physiological bases of magnetotherapy. The use of magnetotherapy in selected disease entities.
  2. Physical and physiological bases of ultrasound and phototherapy. The use of ultrasound and phototherapy in selected disease entities.
  3. Physical and physiological bases of lasertherapy. The use of lasertherapy in selected disease entities.
  4. Devices used in magnetotherapy and principles of operation. Indications and contraindications for treatments. Methods of performing treatments in the field of magnetotherapy.
  5. Devices used in ultrasound treatment and principles of operation. Indications and contraindications for treatments. Methods of performing treatments in the field of ultrasound therapy.
  6. Devices used in phototherapy and principles of operation. Indications and contraindications for treatments. Methods of performing treatments in the field of phototherapy.

 

Learning outcomes:

Hydrotherapy:

  1. The student has knowledge of the functioning of the human body in the aquatic environment.
  2. The student knows the rules of rehabilitation with the use of hydrotherapy treatments.
  3. The student knows indications and contraindications for hydrotherapy treatments.
  4. The student can plan and carry out an individual rehabilitation plan for a patient with the use of the aquatic environment.
  5. The student can independently perform treatments in the field of hydrotherapy.
  6. The student can perform hydrotherapy treatments taking into account patients with different diseases.

 

Electrotherapy:

  1. The student has basic knowledge of electrotherapy.
  2. The student knows the stimuli acting on the human body during physiotherapy treatment.
  3. The student has basic knowledge of the influence of physiotherapy treatment on the human body.
  4. Has practical knowledge of performing electrotherapy treatment.
  5. The student knows indications and contraindications for electrotherapy treatments.
  6. The student can perform treatments using DC.
  7. The student can perform treatments using low frequency currents.
  8. The student can perform treatments using medium frequency currents.
  9. The student can perform treatments using high frequency currents.

 

Thermo-, laser- and magnetotherapy:

  1. The student has knowledge of physical and physiological bases of magnetotherapy and its use in chosen diseases.
  2. The student has knowledge of physical and physiological bases of ultrasound therapy and its use in chosen diseases.
  3. The student has knowledge of physical and physiological bases of phototherapy and its use in chosen diseases.
  4. The student has knowledge of physical and physiological bases of lasertherapy and its use in chosen diseases.
  5. The student knows indications and contraindications for physiotherapy treatments.
  6. The student can independently operate the apparatuses used in magnetotherapy, ultrasound therapy and phototherapy.
  7. The student can independently operate the apparatuses used in lasertherapy.
  8. The student can independently perform magnetotherapy, ultrasound therapy and phototherapy treatment in different diseases.
  9. The student can independently perform lasertherapy treatment in different diseases.

 

Assessment method: exam

Music Therapy

Curriculum content:

  1. Music as a method of controlling the physiological life processes
  2. The history of music therapy.
  3. Music therapy for children visually impaired and sighted
  4. Music therapy for patients with motor impairment
  5. Music therapy – the element of therapy for children with autism
  6. Music therapy for patients with eating disorders
  7. Music therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student can describe the influence of music in controlling the physiological life parameters and processes
  2. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for children visually impaired and sighted
  3. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for patients who present motor impairment.
  4. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for children with autism.
  5. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for patients with eating disorders
  6. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for patients with Parkinson’s disease

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Kinesiotherapy in Rheumatology

Curriculum content:

  1. Discussing disease entities in the field of rheumatology that kinesiotherapy can be applied to.
  2. Discussing the principles of rehabilitation in different disease entities in the field of rheumatology.
  3. Discussing the walking pattern in different disease entities in the field of rheumatology.
  4. The use and function of orthopaedic equipment in rheumatic diseases.

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student knows disease entities in the field of rheumatology that kinesiotherapy can be applied to.
  2. The student knows the principles of rehabilitation in different disease entities in the field of rheumatology.
  3. The student can discuss the walking pattern in different disease entities in the field of rheumatology.
  4. The student knows the use and function of orthopaedic equipment in rheumatic diseases.

Assessment method: credit

Kinesiotherapy

Curriculum content:

  1. Repetition of information from anatomy, neurology and physiology in the context of kinesiotherapy.
  2. Discussing disease entities that kinesiotherapy can be applied to.
  3. Basic clinical trials – the purpose and manner of execution.
  4. Discussing the principles of rehabilitation in different disease entities.
  5. Discussing the walking pattern and the development of the walking pattern in different diseases.
  6. The rules for walking after endoprosthetics of the hip and knee joint.
  7. Discussing the principles and methods of kinesiotherapy.
  8. Causes and prevention of spasticity.
  9. The use and functioning of orthopaedic equipment.

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student has knowledge of anatomy, neurology and physiology.
  2. The student knows disease entities that kinesiotherapy can be applied to.
  3. The student knows and can carry out basic clinical tests.
  4. The student knows the principles of rehabilitation in different disease entities.
  5. The student can discuss the walking pattern and the development of the walking pattern in different diseases.
  6. The student knows the rules for walking after endoprosthetics of the hip and knee joint.
  7. The student knows the rules and methods, as well as concepts of kinesiotherapy.
  8. The student knows the causes of and how to prevent spasticity.
  9. The student knows the use and functioning of orthopaedic equipment.

 

Assessment method: exam

Fundamentals of Scientific Information

Curriculum content:

  1. Knowledge of medical sources of scientific information.
  2. Issues related to the recognition and defining own need for information.
  3. Mechanisms for building information retrieval strategies with special emphasis on targeted search.
  4. Bibliographical references – description and bibliographical records.
  5. Basic issues of copyright.
  6. Methods of searching for information in the literature, bibliographic and full text databases and other sources of medical information.
  7. Access to scientific journals in the field of public health and health-related sciences (printed and electronic).
  8. Principles of preparation of bibliographical record according to the Vancouver system.
  9. Methods for assessing the reliability of sources of information, critical analysis and selection of information, especially from electronic sources.

Learning outcomes

  1. The student has knowledge of medical sources of scientific information.
  2. The student can recognize and define own needs for information.
  3. The student knows mechanisms for building information retrieval strategies with special emphasis on targeted search.
  4. The student knows types of scientific publications.
  5. The student knows the styles of preparing bibliographical records.
  6. The student knows the basics of copyright.

Assessment method: credit with a grade

Pathophysiology

Curriculum content:

  1. Overall assessment (on the body level) of causes of a disease.
  2. Detailed assessment (on the organ level) of causes of a disease.
  3. Assessment of the formation mechanisms of diseases, systemic reactions to pathological phenomena – fever, pain reactions.
  4. Assessment of compensatory and repair mechanisms, the phenomenon of regeneration.
  5. Overall assessment of the pathomechanism of a disease, discussing subjects related to pathophysiology of organs.
  6. Assessment of distinction between physiological, compensation and pathological mechanisms.

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The students has knowledge of detailed assessment (on the organ level) of causes of a disease.
  2. The student has knowledge of the formation mechanisms of diseases.
  3. The student has knowledge of compensatory and repair mechanisms.
  4. The student knowledge of the pathomechanism of a disease.
  5. The student has knowledge of distinction between physiological, compensation and pathological mechanisms.
  6. The student can describe the development of diseases at the body level.
  7. The student can describe the causes of the development of diseases at the organ level.
  8. The student can describe the pathomechanism of a disease.
  9. The student can distinguish between physiological, compensatory and pathological mechanisms.

 

Assessment method: credit

Neurophysiology

Curriculum content:

  1. Anatomy of the central nervous system.
  2. Anatomy of the peripheral nervous system.
  3. Physiology of nerve cell.
  4. The development of the nervous system.
  5. Basics neurological examination.
  6. Additional examinations in neurology.
  7. Neuroimaging.
  8. Studies of the bioelectrical activity of the brain.
  9. Basic neurological syndromes.

 

Learning outcomes:

  1. The student has knowledge of the basics of anatomical and physiological functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system.
  2. The student has knowledge of the theoretical foundations and basic terminology used in additional examinations in neurology.
  3. The student has knowledge of the anatomic and physiologic bases of the neurological examination.
  4. Suggests the use of additional examinations of patients in selected disease entities.
  5. Draws conclusions based on the data obtained from a neurological examination and additional examinations of patients in selected disease entities.
  6. The student can independently carry out a preliminary assessment of the neurological status of patients in selected disease entities
  7. The student can communicate effectively with the patient, the patient’s family and social group.
  8. Manifests readiness to cooperate in an interdisciplinary teams in accordance with the laws and rules of professional ethics.
  9. The student can formulate opinions on various aspects of physiotherapy.

Assessment method: credit

Biology and Botany

This course consists of:

  • elements of organization of living matter
  • functioning of organisms
  • elements of ecology
  • elements of parasitology and evolution of the parasite-host system
  • cytophysiology — cell physiology
  • elements of classical, population, and molecular genetics
  • morphological and anatomic characteristics of major systematic units of prokaryotic organisms, fungi, and plants delivering medicinal materials used in pharmacy
  • research methods in taxonomy
  • recognition of cell and tissue components as well as of organs and species of pharmaceutical significance
  • elements of the biotechnology of superior plants — plant growth regulators, in-vivo cultures, and microreproduction
  • biotechnology in collecting medicinal materials
  • plant protection systems
  • methods of searching for new medical plants — ethnobotany
  • medicinal and protected plants in natural conditions and cultivated
  • medicinal plant herbarium

Biophysics

This course covers:

  • physical fundamentals of physiological processes — circulation, nerve conduction, gas exchange, kinesis, and substance exchange
  • influence of physical factors on the environment of living organisms
  • methodology of measuring the biophysical values
  • biophysical aspects of diagnostics and therapy

Mathematics and Statistics

This course focuses on:

  • elementary functions
  • inverse functions
  • elements of differential and integral calculus
  • first-order differential equations
  • elements of probability calculus and mathematical statistics — probability of the event occurrence,
  • random variables and their distribution, and an average value and its variance
  • basic distributions of random variables
  • point and interval estimation of parameters
  • testing statistical hypotheses
  • correlation and regression

First Aid

  • recognition of health hazards and life-threatening situations
  • evaluation of basic vital signs in emergency situations
  • recovery and stabilization of basic life functions, including the functions of the circulatory and respiratory systems
  • protection and stabilization of different areas of the human body in patients with external injuries
  • performance of life-saving procedures in specific types of environmental hazards
  • organization and management of certified and safe transportation modes for people in emergency situations

General and Inorganic Chemistry

  • atoms and particles
  • the periodic table of elements
  • radioactive isotopes and their applications to diagnostics and treatment
  • mechanisms of creation and types of chemical bonds
  • complex compounds
  • states of matter concentration
  • solutions
  • oxidation and reduction processes
  • characteristics of metals and non-metals
  • identification of inorganic substances
  • application of inorganic substances in pharmacy

Medical Anatomy

  • fundamentals of human anatomy
  • elements of functional and developmental anatomy
  • interdependence between the structure and function of the body in sickness and in health

History of Pharmacy

  • history of pharmaceutical agents and pharmaceutics
  • evolution of pharmaceutical knowledge
  • developments in pharmaceutical sciences
  • history of pharmacies and pharmaceutics
  • historical roots of pharmacy education
  • medical and pharmaceutical traditions and culture

Chemical, Instrumental, and Pharmaceutical Analysis

  • classical methods of quantitative analysis — gravimetric analysis, bulk analysis, alkalimetry and acidimetry, redoxymetry, argentometry, complexometry, and gas analysis
  • the characteristics and classification of instrumental methods
  • spectroscopic, electrochemical, and separation methods

Organic Chemistry

  • classification of carbon compounds — rules for nomenclature
  • structure of organic compounds within the framework of the theory of atomic and molecular orbitals
  • mesometric and inductive effects
  • types of chemical reactions — substitution, addition, and elimination
  • mechanisms of chemical reactions
  • systematics of organic compounds according to the function groups occurring in them
  • properties of: carbohydrates, fluorohydrates, organometallic compounds, amines, nitro compounds, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, ketons, carboxylic acids, the function and skeletal derivatives of carboxylic acids, and derivatives of carbonic acid
  • the structure and properties of five- or six-membered heterocyclic compounds containing the N, O, and S atoms
  • the structure and properties of natural compounds: alkaloids, carbohydrates, steroids, terpenes, lipids, peptides, and proteins
  • preparation of compounds
  • analysis of organic compounds

Physical Chemistry

  • elements of quantum mechanics
  • elements of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics
  • mechanisms of catalysis
  • polyphasic system physiocochemistry and physiocochemistry of surface phenomena
  • elements of electrochemistry
  • physiocochemical fundamentals of pharmacokinetics

Microbiology

  • general and particular bacteriology
  • elements of virology and mycology
  • characteristics of bacteria, viruses, and pathogenic fungi
  • the influence of chemotherapeutics, disinfectants, and antiseptics on microorganisms
  • elements of microbiological diagnostics
  • fundamentals of pharmaceutical microbiology

Pharmacology

  • general pharmacology
  • mechanisms of drug actions
  • pharmacological effects

Pharmacognosy and Natural Drugs

  • acquisition of medicinal materials of natural origin — mainly of plant origin
  • biologically active compounds of plant origin, with their chemical composition and effects:
    • primary metabolites — carbohydrates, fats, and proteins
    • secondary metabolites — glycosides, terpenoids, phenylpropanoids, alkaloids
  • the pharmacopoeial and non-pharmacopoeial materials containing biologically active compounds of plant origin
  • identification, quality assessment, and standardization of medicinal plant materials
  • drugs of different origins: mineral, viral, bacterial, fungal, plant, and animal
  • natural drugs in a pharmacological arrangement — composition, form, action, application, and dosage
  • pharmaceutical preparations available in the market
  • mineral preparation, bacterial preparations (enzymes), and animal preparations (enzymes, venoms, and proteins)
  • preparations used in apitherapy
  • plant medicines and mixtures of plant materials
  • Galenic preparations — compositions
  • domestic and foreign preparations
  • the place of phytotherapy in contemporary health care
  • quality assessment of plant-derived medicines
  • rules governing introduction of plant-derived medicines to the pharmaceutical market

Introduction to Applied Pharmacy

  • rules related to good pharmacy practice in the context of pharmaceutical care
  • rules for dispensing of prescriptions
  • distribution of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs
  • the operation of pharmacy computer programs
  • drug information
  • counseling for independent use of drugs
  • interactions and risks in multidrug therapy
  • elements of interpersonal communication
  • elements of marketing and management

Physiological and Pathophysiological Bases for Therapeutics

  • elements of cytophysiology
  • mechanisms of nervous and hormonal regulation
  • elements of the physiology of major body systems: integumentary, musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, nervous, endocrine, urinary, reproductive, and body fluid(s) and electrolytes
  • secretion and thermoregulation
  • adaptive mechanisms
  • influence of drugs on physiological functions of the human body
  • elements of cell pathophysiology
  • disorders of the adaptive functions of the body
  • pathophysiology of the blood and the immune system
  • disorders of the body’s self-regulation
  • fundamentals of pathophysiology of selected body systems
  • mechanisms of neoplasm development
  • metabolic disorders
  • elements of etiology

Pharmaceutical Technology

  • characteristics and requirements for various forms of drug delivery
  • unit processes and adjuvant substances
  • methods of liquid, semisolid, and solid drug preparation
  • Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) rules for drugs
  • good preparation practice rules for prescription drugs
  • quality and stability of dosage forms
  • biopharmaceutical aspects of formulating dosage forms

Hygiene and Epidemiology

  • environmental factors affecting human health
  • environmental pollution connected with human activity
  • hygiene of environmental elements: air, water, and soil
  • hygiene of the human dwelling and workplace environments — occupational diseases
  • environmental factors of neoplastic diseases
  • disease prevention
  • safety, occupational hygiene, and ergonomics in pharmacy
  • mental hygiene and addiction prevention
  • elements of epidemiology — planning, methodology, and strategy for epidemiological research
  • epidemiological databases

Biochemistry

  • protein structure and biological functions
  • enzymology
  • structure and functions of biological membranes
  • transportation mechanisms
  • molecular aspects of signal transduction
  • biological oxidation and bioenergetics
  • metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids
  • catabolism of proteins, amino acids, and biogenic amines
  • molecular mechanisms of DNA, RNA, and protein biosynthesis
  • mutagenesis and DNA repair systems
  • molecular mechanisms for the biotransformation of drugs
  • integration and regulation of metabolic processes
  • drugs as modificators of the metabolic processes

Biotechnology

  • productive potential of living cells and organisms — biochemical fundamentals and possibilities of regulation with technological processes
  • culture of microorganisms, and in-vitro cultures of animal and plant cells — management of the biosynthesis and biotransformation processes from the pharmaceutical production perspective
  • the obtaining and applications of immobilized biocatalysts
  • applications of the protoplast fusion
  • molecular biotechnology — obtaining and inserting genes into cells of plant and animal microorganisms, gene expression regulation, and production of pharmaceuticals with the recombinant DNA technology
  • the concept of gene therapy
  • insertion of genes and inhibition of gene expression in the organism

Patient Care

  • causes of medication errors/systems approaches
  • the human factor in errors
  • strategies for reducing human errors
  • pharmacy leadership in medication safety

Medicinal Chemistry

A review of medicinal substances in the pharmacological arrangement with particular reference to international nomenclature and synonyms for basic preparations used in the pharmacotherapy of: diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems, cardiovascular system, digestive system, and the excretory system; as well as in demonstrating the anti-infective activity of drugs used in hormone therapy, vitamins, and enzymes.

Relationships between the structure of a medicinal substance and the mechanism of action with respect to the therapeutic usefulness of drugs, in the context of the biochemical mechanism of their action, routes of drug administration, drug distribution in the body, biotransformation, and their adverse and toxic effects.

Quality control of drugs in accordance with the Polish Pharmacopoeia and the European Pharmacopoeia.

Classical and instrumental methods in the assessment of medicinal substances and their dosage forms.

Drug Synthesis

  • search methods for biologically active compounds — leads and their optimization
  • high throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry
  • selected methods for obtaining intermediate and final products in the synthesis of medicinal substances
  • physical and chemical unit processes — their economics and ecology
  • optical isometry and the methods of obtaining optically active compounds as a result of the division of racemates and asymmetric synthesis
  • polymorphism
  • Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)
  • the pharmaceutical industry in Poland
  • patent protection
  • synthesis of selected drugs

Immunology and Oncology

  • competent immunological cells
  • antigens and antibodies
  • the mechanisms of immune response
  • non-specific immunity — interferons and the complement system
  • regulation of immune processes
  • elements of immunopathology
  • oversensitivity and allergic diseases
  • autoimmunization
  • tumor immunology
  • elements of transplantation immunology
  • immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy
  • elements of immunological diagnostics

Clinical Nutrition and Health Promotion

  • influence of nutrients on human health
  • nutritional recommendations regarding food composition and diet in the prevention of civilization-related diseases — arteriosclerosis, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, and food allergies
  • role of vitamins and the macro- and microelements in nutritional therapy
  • medicinal products containing dietary supplements
  • food products with special nutritional designations
  • dietary supplements
  • health and analytical aspects of: fortified foods, functional foods, novel foods
  • food additives
  • food contamination
  • drug interaction with selected food components
  • health-related quality control in food
  • analytics in food control

Communication, Behavior, and Ethics in Pharmacy Practice

  • pharmaceutical ethics as well as medical and dental ethics — definitions and ethical systems
  • fundamentals of bioethics
  • code of ethics for pharmacists
  • shaping of sensitivity as well as of moral and ethical attitudes as the basis for  pharmaceutical care

Toxicology

  • the role and challenges for contemporary toxicology
  • toxins, toxicity levels, and forms of intoxication
  • the effects of xenobiotics on the body — absorption, distribution, and biotransformation
  • Phase I and Phase II reactions
  • inhibition and induction of microsomal enzymes
  • mechanisms of toxic action and bioactivation
  • distant toxic effects
  • toximetry
  • investigation and evaluation of the acute, subacute, and chronic toxicity, as well as of the carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic activity
  • contemporary toxicological analysis — methods of detection and determination of xenobiotics in the biological material and of the environmental elements
  • toxicomanias
  • environmental toxicology
  • chemical safety and exposure assessment

Advanced Pharmacotherapy

  • pharmacotherapy of selected diseases with special regard for civilization-related diseases and the diseases requiring long-term treatment
  • monotherapy and polypragmasy
  • drug-induced complications
  • individualization of pharmacotherapy determined by age, pathological states, genetic, and environmental factors
  • monitoring of adverse drug effects
  • sources for data acquisition, documentation, and forms of information exchange
  • contemporary aspects of the doctor-pharmacist and the pharmacist-patient cooperation

Pharmacokinetics

  • the fate of drugs in the body – absorption, distribution, and elimination
  • the determination of pharmacokinetic parameters using compartment and physiological models as well as non-model-based techniques
  • single and multiple drug administration and the inert state
  • influence of pathological states as well as the genetic and environmental factors on drug pharmacokinetics
  • fundamentals of therapeutic drug monitoring

Dental Materials I

The aim of the exercises during this course is to introduce students to the properties of materials used in prosthetic dentistry. Some manual exercises, especially in the dental technician work, will be performed. The theoretical aspects of gypsum, impression materials, and dental waxes will be presented and required for the final grade.

Exercises on a Phantom Head

The overall goal of this course is for students to learn and develop foundational skills in tooth preparation (Black’s classification) and tooth restoration in simulation exercises. The psychomotor skills of the students in simulation conditions will be later applied in the clinic. Students will be introduced to the essential morphology of teeth, basic dental ergonomics, and to the fundamentals of: caries lesion classification, principles of cavity preparation, and tooth restoration. They will also be taught the isolation methods of the operative field. Their theoretical knowledge of biomaterials will be broadened by the clinical properties and the handling of composite resins and amalgam.

Physiology of the Masticatory Organ

This course focuses on the: development of the masticatory organ; growth of the masticatory bones and muscles from birth to maturity; development of teeth; formation of occlusion; physiology of the basic functions of the masticatory organ; saliva secretion; and on the roles of the oral cavity in a normal bodily function.

Dental Materials II

Upon completing this course, students should be competent at:

  • recognizing the currently used dental restorative materials with both their advantages and disadvantages
  • recognizing the currently used dental bases with their advantages and disadvantages
  • recognizing the currently used endodontic materials with their advantages and disadvantages
  • application techniques of the restorative materials, bases, and endodontic materials
  • reviewing the indications for the dental restorative materials, bases, and endodontic materials
  • designing effective indirect restorations based on the material’s biochemical properties
  • designing an effective root canal filling based on the material’s biochemical properties
  • should possess the knowledge of the:
  • science behind the use of dental materials
  • general properties required of dental restorative materials
  • key differences in the bonding, structure, and properties of polymers, alloys, cements, and chelates
  • composition and setting mechanisms of restorative dental materials, bases, and endodontic materials
  • material properties by which the clinical performance is assessed, i.e., the mechanical, chemical, physical, biological, adhesive, esthetic, and rheological properties
  • limitations of the restorative dental materials

and be familiar with the:

  • aspects of material safety related to dentistry
  • biological response of the tissues to restorative dental materials
  • primary and secondary bonds
  • identification of the main groups of solid compounds based on those bonds

Dental Occlusion

This course consists of exercises introducing students to the main aspects of manual work in prosthetic dentistry as well as to a dental technician’s work. Drawing, carving, and drilling take a major part of dental practice and the strengthening of these manual skills is the goal of these exercises. Students must learn the general anatomy of the teeth, the tooth numbering systems, and the basic rules of using dental instruments.

Dental Radiology

Upon completing this course, students should be competent in:

  • recognizing anatomical structures that can be identified on different intra- and extra-oral images
  • recognition of the radiological features of common dental diseases
  • making an intra-oral periapical and bitewing x-ray image
  • making computer-based modifications of x-ray images obtained with the digital radiographic method
  • describing the principles of different imaging techniques such as CT, MRI, and US

have the knowledge of:

  • physical properties of x-rays
  • different x-ray techniques used to obtain images of the skull, jaws, and teeth
  • ways of protecting patients and staff from the hazards of x-ray radiation
  • key differences between long- vs. short-cone apparatus for making an intra-oral x-ray image
  • limitations of particular imaging techniques
  • chemical processing of x-ray images
  • direct and indirect digital x-ray methods used today in dental practice

and be familiar with the:

  • legal aspects of using ionized radiation
  • biological responses of the tissues to dental radiation
  • CBCT technique and its general applications to dentistry

Oral Pathology

This course covers the following subjects: mucous membrane pathology; benign and malignant neoplasia of the connective tissue; neoplasia of the tooth-forming tissues; neoplastic changes in skeleton-forming tissues; diseases of the gingivae, periodontium, and teeth; diseases of the salivary glands; and diseases of the tongue.

Maxillofacial Surgery with Oncology

In this course students will learn about first aid in maxillofacial injuries, symptoms of maxillofacial traumas, their diagnosis, and methods of treatment. Course participants will learn about the dentogenous and other origins of the inflammatory processes in the orofacial region. The maxillary sinus complications related to dental treatments will be discussed. The diagnostic problems and treatment of benign and malignant tumors of the oral cavity and the maxillofacial region will be presented. The knowledge of facial and orthognatic anomalies including their surgical treatment will be demonstrated.

Diseases of the Oral Mucosa

This course will cover:

  • morphology, physiology and pathology of the mucosa
  • examination and differential diagnosis of diseases of the mucosa
  • drugs administered in the treatment of the diseases of the mucosa
  • clinical aspects, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases, keratotic disorders, and diseases caused by immunological disorders and allergic conditions
  • congenital defects of the mucosa
  • diseases of the minor salivary glands
  • discoloration of the mucosa — etiology, clinical aspects, and treatment
  • iatrogenic congenital changes in the mucosa
  • side effects of drugs in the oral cavity
  • dysplasias and dystrophic mucosal conditions
  • prosthetic and electrogalvanic inflammation of the oral cavity — etiology, clinical symptoms, and treatment
  • diseases of the mucosa with characteristic locations
  • diseases typical for pediatric and geriatric patients
  • ulceration of the mucosa
  • oncological prevention
  • oral effects of occupational exposure

Dental Prosthetics

The course content is listed below.

Complete prostheses:

  • clinical examination of the edentulous patient
  • anatomical impressions
  • functional impressions
  • registration of occlusion
  • positioning of teeth
  • complete denture fitting
  • denture control and correction
  • removable denture repair and relining
  • functional disturbances in the stomatognathic system
  • prosthetic procedures in periodontal diseases

Skeletal dentures:

  • their structure, indications for, and clinical procedures
  • materials for and the making of a metal frame
  • prosthetic pathologies
  • prosthetic treatment of children and adolescents
  • selected issues in dental prosthetics

Pediatric Dentistry

The full course content is listed below.

  • goals and objectives of developmental dentistry
  • management of children in a dental clinic
  • dental care in particular stages of ontogenesis
  • preventive and therapeutic procedures
  • assessment of developmental anomalies or defects
  • examining young patients
  • materials and drugs in pediatric dentistry
  • dental caries in children
  • diseases of the pulp and periapical tissues
  • periodontal diseases in children
  • common mucous membrane diseases in childhood and adolescence
  • dental procedures in the cases of suspected focal infection in children’s oral cavity
  • traumatic tooth injuries
  • symptoms of systemic diseases in children’s oral cavity, including infectious diseases
  • selected problems in the primary dental health care of children and adolescents
  • prosthetic and therapeutic procedures in childhood and adolescence
  • prevention

Introduction to Public Health

The course focuses on the following issues:

  • equipment for a dental surgery clinic
  • costs of office management
  • documentation
  • legal requirements for running a dental surgery clinic
  • dental surgeon’s legal responsibilities
  • ethical aspects of the dental surgeon’s work

Advanced Endodontics (elective course)

The course content is listed below.

  • basic principles of modern endodontics
  • methods of root canal preparation
  • diseases of the periapical tissues
  • surgical treatment methods used in endodontics
  • endodontics as a preparation for prosthodontic treatment/a prosthesis
  • scientific evaluation of the methods used in endodontics

Conservative Dentistry

An overview of selected problems in adult dental treatment.
Conservative treatment:

  • methods, techniques, and materials
  • treating multi-rooted teeth
  • the step-back method of preparing the root canal and filling it with the lateral condensation method
  • conservative dentistry and periodontal therapy as part of a complex treatment and rehabilitation of the masticatory apparatus

Orthodontics

This course focuses on the diagnosis and methods of treating defects of the masticatory organ with the use of muscles, reeducation of dysfunctions, and various fixed and removable orthodontic devices. It also covers:

  • reasons for combined orthodontic-surgical or orthodontic-prosthetic team therapy
  • factors determining treatment effectiveness
  • implementation of preventive measures in orthodontics

Periodontal Disease

  • anatomy and physiology of the periodontium and the structures related to it
  • biological processes in the periodontium
  • prevention
  • epidemiology
  • microbiological and immunological aspects of periodontal disease
  • classification and indices of periodontal disease related to the presence of dental plaque
  • clinical diagnosis
  • goals and procedures for the treatment of the periodontal disease
  • surgical treatment
  • introduction to osteo-integrational biology
  • controlled tissue regeneration
  • traumatic occlusion in the etipoathogenesis of periodontal disease
  • prevention
  • complex treatment of periodontal disease
  • pharmacotherapy

Dental Surgery

  • pathological processes at the root apex
  • bone cysts of the jaw and soft tissues of the facial part of the skull
  • traumatology
  • diseases of the salivary glands and premalignant conditions
  • benign tumors in the oral cavity
  • diseases of the temporomandibular joints
  • surgical preparation of the oral cavity for the application of prostheses
  • diseases of the maxillary sinuses
  • diseases of selected cranial nerves
  • osteodystrophies of the jaws – diagnosis and differentiation
  • surgical treatment of periodontal disease
  • dental implants
  • AIDS and HIV
  • application of physiotherapy in dentistry

Geriatric Dentistry

The activities in this course focus on presenting the characteristics of treating geriatric patients, on emphasizing the differences in the treatment of elderly patients as well as on the psychological and somatic aspects of their health.

These activities include clinical exercises in conservative dentistry, periodontology, surgery, and prosthetic dentistry in the treatment room. During ten clinical sessions students treat geriatric patients using the procedures of: conservative dentistry, periodontology, surgery, and prosthetic dentistry. The activities in prosthetic dentistry include treatment with the use of various total dentures, treatment of prosthetic stomatopathy, relining and adaptation of old prostheses, discussion of some unique cases of prosthetic geriatric patients, and implants.

Ergonomics in Dentistry

People in the dental profession are prone to long-lasting, one-sided injuries to their musculoskeletal system due to a high number of repetitive movements and positions. Upon completing this course, students should:

  • know the rules for organizing a dental office and managing dental work
  • know the ways of working with the patient placed in a supine position and without the help of a dental assistant
  • become familiar with the causes of muscoskeletal injuries related to their daily professional physical activities
  • learn the ways of preventing and reducing repetitive strain injuries and discomfort
  • know how to make ergonomic choices of and adjustments to the dominant/preferred hand and how to hold medical instruments in order to minimize repetitive strain
  • become familiar with the rules of dental work using magnifying glasses (lupes) and a surgical microscope
  • learn to estimate the risks of patient overload or physical strain and injury due to poor planning of patient visits both in the number and the type of dental procedures performed
  • apply stress reduction techniques to reduce physical and emotional exhaustion

Community Dentistry II

The course content is listed below.

  • oral epidemiology
  • society and causes of social inequalities in oral health
  • oral health promotion
  • economic perspectives and analysis of public financing for dental care
  • food policy and the use of fluoride in the presentation of oral disease
  • delivery models of oral health care
  • dental examinations of school children at different ages and of different dentations
  • dental examinations of the elderly

Seminar subjects:

  1. INTRODUCTION
    • historical background and current state of public oral health
    • types of community services for different population groups
    • types of community programs used in Europe and the United States
    • dental personnel involved in the community oral health programs
  2. ORAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    • diagnostic tests used for caries detection and periodontal disease
    • measurement of the frequency and prevalence of oral disease
    • interpretation of the epidemiological studies in dentistry
  3. SOCIETY AND CAUSES OF SOCIAL INEQUALITIES IN ORAL HEALTH
    • salivary diagnostic tests — buffer capacity and microbial
    • sociological aspects of oral health
    • social stratification — class structures in relation to income, education, and occupation
    • social inequalities in lifestyle and oral health concerns
  4. ORAL HEALTH PROMOTION
    • principles of and approaches to the oral health promotion
    • health education and existing patterns of dental health education
  5. ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES ON AND ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC FINANCING FOR DENTAL CARE
    • methods of economic analyses
    • cost-effectiveness and limitations to economic evaluations in dentistry
  6. NUTRITIONAL GUIDELINES AND THE USE OF FLUORIDE IN THE PRESENTATION OF ORAL DISEASE
    • the effects of nutrition and diet on dental health
    • sugar consumption and its consequences for dental health
    • promotion of tooth-friendly candies and beverages
    • proper fluoridation methods for the community
    • decision-making about fluoridation
  7. MODELS OF ORAL HEALTH CARE DELIVERY
    • examples of dental care in different countries
    • introduction to the ART method — Atraumatic Restorative Technique
    • dental instruments for the ART method
    • ozone therapy in dental treatment
    • new chemical compounds in caries prevention — Recaldent
  8. DENTAL EXAMINATION OF SCHOOLCHILDREN AT DIFFERENT AGES AND OF DIFFERENT DENTITIONS/DENTATIONS
    • procedures of epidemiological dental examination according to the WHO instructions
    • oral hygiene aids and assessment of their effectiveness
  9. DENTAL EXAMINATION OF THE ELDERLY
    • problems of geriatric dentistry
    • procedures for dental examination according to the WHO instructions
    • oral hygiene aids and assessment of their effectiveness
  10. DENTAL CARE FOR CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
    • examples of high-risk patients and their special needs in dental treatment
    • programs for patients with special needs
  11. DENTAL CARE FOR HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS
    • hospital conditions and the use of suitable resources for oral hygiene
    • temporary dental help in a hospital setting

Community Dentistry I

This course is comprised of: Public Health, Epidemiology, Hygiene, and Medical Sociology.

Its goal is to present the essential knowledge of the subjects mentioned above as well as to foster the development of appropriate attitudes and skills relevant to a future dentist who is active the social environment.

Upon completing this course students should possess a basic understanding of public health as a science, as a medical discipline, and also as a field of practical activities, from the theoretical and practical point of view, and with reference to its historical as well as contemporary aspects. Emphasis will be placed on the way public health contributes to the health status of a population.

Oral Microbiology

This course covers:

  • disinfection and sterilization methods
  • resident oral microflora
  • essentials of microbiological diagnostics
  • the genera: Staphylococcus (other coagulase-negative Staphylococci), Streptococcus (Viridans Streptococci: S. Mutans, S. Salivarius, and S. mitis), Neisseria (N. mucosa), Moraxella catarrhalis
  • the genera: Legionella, Listeria, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Propionibacterium
  • gram-negative rods, the genera: Haemophilus and Pseudomonas
  • anaerobic gram-positive bacteria
  • dental plaque
  • the role of saliva in the maintenance of oral health
  • dental caries
  • microbiology of periodontal diseases
  • microbiology of dentoalveolar infections
  • infections of the pulp, periapical tissues, and the jaw bone
  • actinomycosis
  • antimicrobial therapy for oral infections
  • spiral bacteria, the genera: Vibrio, Heliobacter, Borrellia, and Leptospira
  • fungi
  • viruses
  • diagnostic medical microbiology

Gross Anatomy

This course is focused on teaching the morphological and functional anatomy of the human body. The goal is to assist the student in developing a three-dimensional, visual image of the way the human body is built. Each student, as a member of a team, carries out a complete dissection of the cadaver. The course consists of lectures devoted mostly to basic anatomy, and of laboratory work devoted to cadaver dissection and the study of cross-sections, pro-sections, skeletal material, models, and x-rays. The anatomical background and vocabulary are presented and used to establish the clinical correlations to other basic medical sciences.

Neuroscience

This course takes on an interdisciplinary approach to the understanding of the organization and the functioning of the central nervous system. It includes a general overview of the basic elements, gross structure, and the appropriate terminology. Students first learn simultaneously parts of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropathology with the clinical neurological pathologies stressed later. Lectures are supplemented by laboratory sessions consisting of human brain dissections and the study of neurophysiology.

Biochemistry

This course introduces the basic principles of biochemistry: the mechanisms of biochemical reactions, biosynthesis, utilization, and the degradation of major constituents of the human body in order to explain the biochemical and pathological bases for various diseases.

Exploration of the metabolic characteristics of each organ is correlated to the understanding of the metabolic interplay between organs. Students learn the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. This course places emphasis on both chemistry and molecular biology providing a biochemical framework for clinical studies.

Human Physiology with Elements of Biophysics

This course acquaints students with the dynamic functional interrelationships that exist between cells, tissues, and organ systems, so that students develop an understanding of the human organism as a whole. The course begins with elements of biophysics and provides a review of the key points previously covered by students in the areas of anatomy, cell biology, and histology. Later, lectures and laboratory exercises are provided on the physiology of the following major body systems: gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive.

Microbiology and Parasitology

This course introduces the basic principles of microbiology including: classification and taxonomy, microbial physiology, the host-parasite relationship, and the epidemiological concepts. Also covered are the epidemiology, symptomology, pathogenesis, laboratory diagnosis, and therapy of the major bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens. The laboratory portion of the course includes laboratory methods in bacteriology, mycology, and parasitology.

Medical Chemistry

This medical chemistry course covers bio-inorganic, bio-organic, and physical chemistry in the basic range of problems concerning the structure, properties, and transformations of biomolecules. Knowledge of these issues is necessary for students to learn and understand the metabolism (biochemistry), the mechanisms of quantitative and qualitative changes (clinical chemistry and pathobiochemistry), and their control (prevention and treatment).

The course consists of lectures, seminars, and laboratory classes, and it introduces students in the first year of the 6-year M.D. program to a variety of physical and chemical properties of organic substances, reactions of the functional groups found in biological molecules, basic chemistry of biological macromolecules, the role of buffer systems, electrolytes and metal ions in biological systems, and to some aspects of enzyme kinetics. Students are introduced to the properties and chemical concepts of important classes of compounds to help them understand the behavior and function of biomolecules in the body.

Philosophy

This course presents the origin, the development, and the present condition of philosophical thinking. It introduces the students to the nature of philosophical problems through discussions, and to the role of Plato as the originator of the new mode of thinking and as the founder of the so-called Great Problems. It outlines the development of philosophy by presenting the greatest thinkers’ ideas as the struggle to reformulate, refine, and solve the Great Problems. Finally, it shows how the 20th-century philosophers suspended the inquiry into the Great Problems shifting their attention to the new ideas about the mind, language, and society.

Introduction to Medicine

The main course objective is to teach students how to study medicine most efficiently. This course, based on former students’ knowledge and experiences, helps the current students start their medical training. It consists of lectures presenting the methods of studying different subjects, e.g., biophysics, anatomy, histology, physiology, and the clinical sciences. It also demonstrates the role of basic sciences in the clinical practice.

Histology

This course provides basic knowledge of the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organs at the microscopic level, enabling students to recognize and identify all major cell and tissue types in the human body. The normal structural characteristics are correlated to the physiological process as a background material for the study of microscopic pathology. Lectures are illustrated with relevant audiovisual materials and photomicrographs. During the laboratory sessions, each student has the use of a binocular microscope and a collection of over 80 stained tissue slide preparations. Computer analysis of cells and histochemical reactions are discussed in seminars and demonstrations.

Embryology

This course introduces the basic and clinical aspects of normal and abnormal human development. Included in it as a major part of the course is the organogenesis that is the origin and formation of all organ systems in the human body. The various congenital anomalies are explained as deviations from normal development.

Teaching is conducted in lectures. Embryology is also taught in the courses on anatomy and histology.

Medical Sociology

The objective of this course is to provide an overview of the current and the probable future expansion of the society’s role in the regulation of the practice of medicine. The stress is put on the basic aspects of malpractice, including the definition of negligence and the assessment of damages.

Another group of topics presented during this course is related to drug abuse, including alcohol. Also discussed will be: behavioral toxicology and behavioral disturbances; inhalant drugs and their impact on schoolchildren; nutritional and legal aspects of drug use, cigarette smoking, and the effects of drugs on growth and development.

The strategies for dealing with the alcohol or substance abuse problems will also be presented, with the emphasis placed on stimulating the awareness of, interest in, and inquiry into the historical trends, issues, controversies, and realities of providing effective programs for addressing them.

Lastly, the problem of spouse and child abuse will be covered. It will be discussed together with its sociologic and psychological causes, and with the existing diagnostic and prevention techniques.

Public Health

The course in public health is intended to develop the essential knowledge of the health of the population, as influenced by internal and external factors to the community, including its relations with and the functioning of the healthcare systems. This course also focuses on developing the kind of attitudes and skills which are desired in a future doctor who is active in the social, political, and economic arenas.

Upon completing the course, students should gain a basic understanding of public health as (a) a science and a medical discipline, (b) as a field for practical activities — both from the theoretical and the practical viewpoint, (c) and with respect to its historical as well as contemporary aspects. It also emphasizes the way in which public health contributes to the health status of a population.

Medical Genetics

This course offers an understanding of the contribution of genetic diseases to human morbidity and mortality. The basic aspects of DNA chemistry, structure, function and regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes are taught using clinical examples. The clinical applications of genetic principles and laboratory techniques, including chromosomal characterization, are emphasized. Case presentations are used to illustrate the basic principles of genetic diseases.

Pathology

General pathology emphasizes those changes or reactions which may occur in various diseases and in different organs. The lecture series covers: cell injury and death, inflammation, blood coagulation, thrombo-embolism and infarction, vascular diseases, tumors, immune deficiency diseases, infectious diseases, environmental pathology, and the diseases of infancy, childhood, and the old age. The laboratory work involves study of the material arranged in a series of modules. These modules contain not only color transparencies of gross and microscopic changes but also a number of electron photomicrographs. The systemic pathology part of the course will deal with specific diseases affecting the various organs of the body. The laboratory sessions for this module consist of the examination of a series of slides arranged to correspond with the lecture material which shows the microscopic changes at the various stages of disease.

Morphological Basis for Clinical Diagnosis

This course offers students a unique opportunity to focus on carefully selected clinical cases. It is intended as a feedback and revision aid so that students can assess the extent of the limitations to their understanding of pathology.

First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Students learn how to manage the practical knowledge of resuscitation. Most common emergencies that will be studied are: post-traumatic bleeding, bone fractures, cardiac arrest, hypo- and hyperthermia, pneumothorax etc. Emphasis is put on the prompt diagnosis of acute cardiac and respiratory failures.

Law and Ethics

This course includes a series of lectures and discussions designed to show how doctors’ lives and work are affected by civil and criminal law, and how to help them meet the challenges posed by the various ethical problems. Starting with those before birth and up to those after death, faced by physicians throughout their medical practice.

Medical Polish

This course is designed to develop basic communication skills in Polish. The scope of this course will cover common, everyday situations including: patient interviews, gathering of medical data, and the basic conversation skills required to conduct medical examinations in Polish clinics.

Latin

The Latin in medicine course is designed for foreign students taking Medical Latin in order to provide them with a general knowledge of Latin.

This course directly assists students with improving their ability to read and write medical prescriptions and diagnoses.

It consists of 30 lessons which cover the basics of grammar illustrated with examples. Each lesson is comprised of two parts — a grammar section explaining grammar rules, and an exercise section with sentences and proverbs illustrating vocabulary usage. The goal of these lectures is to teach essential, specialized vocabulary and grammar so that students learn to understand the medical terminology. Another goal is to teach the structure of and the creation of medical and chemical terminology, drug names, and prescriptions; also offering students a basic knowledge of grammatical structures that they can develop during their further studies.

Grammar topics are reduced to a minimum that is sufficient for comprehending the specialized Latin terminology, i.e.:

  • a brief introduction to pronunciation and spelling
  • all five declinations together with exceptions for certain terms
  • declension and comparison of adjectives in a complete system
  • numerals
  • a brief review of verbs with orientation to the practical use of imperative and conjunctive moods in prescribing medicines
  • most frequently used prepositions
  • prefixes and suffixes

The whole course is focused not on teaching vocabulary through memorization, but to let students understand the principles of word formation.

Pathophysiology

This course discusses the mechanisms of various diseases of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, hematological, immunological, and endocrine systems on both the subcellular and cellular levels. This course provides insights into the disturbed physiological changes resulting from specific disease processes of individual organ systems. It also includes a study of immunological defense mechanisms, repair mechanisms, modes of injury, diseases of development and growth, blood disorders, and neoplasia. Selected problems of human genetics are reemphasized.

Lectures include relevant basic science material, examples of variations in structure and function, related symptoms and signs with common clinical scenarios and therapeutic approaches.

Pharmacology

This course covers the knowledge of the sources, biochemical and physiological effects, mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, as well as of the therapeutic and other beneficial uses of drugs.

Emphasis is placed on understanding the disposition, effects, efficacy, and relative toxicity of all major drug groups in the light of their biochemical and physiological mechanisms. The clinical aspects focus on a rational drug therapy. The use of drugs is analyzed with respect to pharmacologic principles, mechanisms of action, and pathophysiological abnormalities of the disease states.

Hygiene and Epidemiology

The central theme in this course is the importance of preventive medicine. In order to develop this concept, the course includes lectures and exercises in biostatistics, epidemiology, and public health. Laboratory sessions give students practical experience in solving public health problems. The impact of environmental factors on human health is also considered.

Biostatistics

This course introduces basic statistical methodologies including descriptive statistics, normal distribution, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals using the Z and t distributions, regression and correlation, chi-square, and other common nonparametric procedures. Statistical concepts are illustrated by appropriate biomedical applications.

Immunology

This course introduces students to the major principles and mechanisms involved in the function of the immune system. The lectures begin with the presentation of information related to anatomical and histological features of the reticuloendothelial system, humeral immunity, and cellular immunity. The course emphasizes the transposition of basic science information into clinical problems. The laboratory sessions summarize the diagnostic applications of immunological techniques.

Behavioral Science

This course if focused on the psychology and physiology of life cycles. The general objectives are to describe the normal stages of human development and to discuss the psychological and physical factors affecting people in different periods of life.

The goal of the first part of the course is to give students the basic information concerning mental status examination, communication, interviewing, and the factors that may influence the doctor-patient relationship. The next set of seminars covers those aspects of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, and genetics that are related to psychiatry.

Semiotics

The course on semiotics is designed to teach the typical signs and symptoms of the most common disorders. Observation and proper interpretation of signs and symptoms determine to a large extent the success of a good diagnosis. During the course students meet patients with various diseases in the clinical wards and outpatient clinics, take their history, and evaluate the significance of performed observations. This course is designed to be an introduction to the basic internal medicine course offered in later years, and to facilitate the patient contact during students’ training sessions that involve patients.

Internal Medicine

This course introduces the principles of patient diagnosis in the clinical setting with the basic material presented in a series of lectures. Students are expected to develop both a logical approach to the diagnosis and treatment of patient complaints, as well as the technical skills which will enable them to take down a patient history and to perform a physical examination. Each student studies one or two patients per week and presents their cases on the teaching rounds. Then he/she follows these patients throughout their hospital stay, and finally writes a history of each patient’s disease, using the patient’s case as a basis for discussion. Student activities include rounds, consultations, laboratory sessions, specific diagnostic procedures, and treatment planning. Students also participate in outpatient clinics held by physicians. The training experience in this course emphasizes the clinical manifestations of various diseases in such areas as: cardiology, gastroenterology, hematology, nephrology, pulmonology, endocrinology, and nuclear medicine.

Pharmacology and Toxicology

The goal of this pharmacology and toxicology course is to provide students with knowledge of drugs that are useful in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases.

The course material will be delivered through lectures and seminars. The seminar content will focus on the subjects covered in lectures. During the seminars, students must be prepared to discuss corresponding topics covered in the lectures.

Emergency Medicine

The objective for this course is to provide students with general knowledge of emergency medicine and the Emergency Medical Systems (EMR), as well as of the basic standard procedures for pre-hospital rescue techniques used onsite of an emergency in the cases of accidents, natural disasters, and mass casualty events.

The course consists of 30 hours which take place at the Chair of Rescue Medicine, the Emergency Medicine Department, and at the Polish National Fire Fighters’ Unit.

Topics presented during the seminars and practical classes include:

  • pre-hospital management of a trauma patient
  • acute coronary syndrome
  • poly-traumatized patient
  • injuries to CNS (Central Nervous System)
  • interpretation of lab results
  • emergencies in children
  • analgesiosedation in emergency medicine

During a one-day visit to a fire fighting unit, students will have the opportunity to learn about the medical rescue techniques used by Polish fire fighters specializing in the search-and-rescue operations.

Disaster Medicine

This course consists of 20 hours of instruction and begins with a series of lectures that provide students with basic knowledge of such subjects as: definition of a disaster and disaster medicine, natural disasters, mass casualty events, and pre-hospital care organization for injured patients. During seminars students learn about hazardous materials and radiation accidents, environmental emergencies, terrorist attacks, toxicology, drug and medication overdoses, and infection control for the medical personnel.

Clinical Psychology

The objective of this course is to provide students with knowledge of the basic psychological paradigms, stress theories, coping styles, adjusting behaviors, and psychomatic medicine. The Department of Clinical Psychology provides students with the understanding of the patient as a whole in the process of coping with their disorders.

Instruction includes a developmental approach to the efforts of both the patient and the family in order for the patient to readjust, recover and return to health.

Students develop their skills to deepen their understanding of the nature of the disease-related stress and the emotional reactions to it. They will learn the protocols for communicating with patients, families, and other professionals. Specifically, they will gain the knowledge of the emotional reactions to the disease, ways of dealing with denial, breaking the bad news, collusion, and of responding to the difficult questions raised by the patient and the family members. Students will be expected to learn about the stages of human life and about the life span theories that explain the life crises occurring in the course of a human life.

History of Medicine

This course’s goal is to provide essential information on the history of medicine, and to present the full-span history of people’s struggle with their bodily infirmities. However, the objective of this course is also to demonstrate the development in different fields of medicine and the changes in the concepts of health and disease. The classes will take into consideration the biographies and achievements of famous scientists to help us understand how we are and where we are today with respect to all of the associated serious problems and controversies. This course is comprised of lectures and seminars.

Occupational Medicine

This course is focused on the diagnosis and treatment of human disease caused entirely or in part by a person’s work environment.

The causes of such diseases may have various aspects and nature including physical, chemical, biological, and neuro-psychological.

The following subjects are discussed during this course: occupational toxicology, physical hazards in the work environment, exposure of healthcare workers to hazards in the work environment, biological hazards, ergonomics, fatigue, localized fatigue, whole body fatigue, cumulative trauma disorders, and occupational risk factors associated with the development of lower back pain.

Students should develop a basic ability to recognize an occupational disease case.

Palliative Care

The palliative medicine course is designed to provide medical students with a holistic, palliative approach to the care of patients with advanced cancer and other malignant, incurable conditions including the end-of-life.

Students will become acquainted with the general philosophy of palliative hospice care principles and organization; symptom epidemiology; pathophysiology and management; ethical dilemmas; communication; family support; and the psychological, social, and spiritual problems in palliative care.

Laboratory Medicine

This course teaches medical students how and when to order laboratory tests in relation to the patient’s symptomology and/or disease, how to interpret these tests, and how to recognize their limitations. Clinical chemistry, clinical hematology, hemostasis, diagnostic immunology, and nuclear medicine are presented in lectures and laboratory sessions.

Pediatrics

The purpose of this clinical rotation is to help students understand the common disorders and diseases of childhood, especially their diagnosis, prevention, and management, including surgery when required. Emphasis is placed on the special needs of newborns. The rotation offers the opportunity to develop the necessary skills required in: taking a pediatric history, examining children of all ages, and in gaining experience in the assessment of the relevant clinical information. Based on which it is possible to formulate a plan of case management that is fully intelligible to the parents, and, if necessary to the child. Students learn history taking, physical examination procedures, as well as the principles of infant feeding, hydration, and drug therapy. Lectures provide students with the basic knowledge of normal physical and mental child development, as well as with the essential information pertaining to cardiac, gastrointestinal, neurological, hematological, immunological, and other types of childhood diseases.

Gynecology and Obstetrics

The goals of this rotation are to familiarize students with the knowledge of the clinical problems encountered in this area. Emphasis is placed on: obtaining experience in routine obstetric delivery, outpatient gynecologic case management of the different conditions; and on paying attention to the public health aspects as they relate to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, venereal diseases, cancer detection, and human sexuality.

Neonatology

The course objective is to provide a base of information concerning the pathology and physiology of newborn infants which is required of every physician.

Course components include: fetal physiology, adaptation to extrauterine life, care of a healthy newborn, breastfeeding, neonatal resuscitation, prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, congenital abnormalities, perinatal asphyxia, birth trauma, perinatal infections, elements of intensive care and mechanical ventilation, surgery in the newborn stage, chronic complications of prematurity, neurodevelopmental problems, and follow-up.

Psychiatry

This course introduces the care of psychiatric patients. Learning objectives are designed to increase students’ ability to recognize psychopathology, use effective interview techniques, make a correct diagnosis of psychiatric disorders, and understand the use of psychopharmacological agents. Students are taught ways to evaluate and manage psychiatric emergencies including substance abuse, ways to become more comfortable with psychiatric patients, and to fully understand the biological, psychological, and social determinants of their behavior. The history and results of the mental status examination are presented to the preceptor and later discussed. Students must attend ward rounds and outpatient office visits and counseling sessions.

Surgery

The main goal of this rotation is to acquaint students with those diseases or injuries that require surgical treatment. Emphasis is placed not on surgical techniques but on learning the pathophysiology of diseases, establishing the diagnosis, and on participating in patient treatments. Students are integrated into the clinical team and are assigned to specific patients. Each student’s responsibilities include: taking histories, performing physical examinations, and participating in patient management including — whenever possible — operative procedures. Attendance at daily physician rounds is mandatory in order to recognize the most common post-operative complications. Subspecialties of surgery include: traumatology, urology, gastroenterology, thoracic, neurosurgery, vascular, and cardiac.

Rheumatology I

The aim of this course is to learn about the:

  • etiopathogenesis of the most common rheumatic diseases
  • basic diagnostic methods in rheumatology
  • signs and symptoms of the most common diseases and their differential diagnostics
  • essentials of the treatment of rheumatic diseases

The course material is presented in the format of case demonstrations during seminars.

Rheumatology II

The goal of this course is to provide students with knowledge of selected aspects of rheumatology. Course material is presented during lectures, seminars, case demonstrations, and clinical classes. The following topics are covered throughout the course:

  • basic knowledge of pathophysiology, molecular biology, and genetics relevant to the most common autoimmune rheumatic conditions
  • basic knowledge of the most common rheumatic diseases including: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, polymyositis dermatomyositis, Sjogren’s syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, vascullitis, and poly-myalgia rheumatica — along with their etiology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical characteristics, natural history, and management
  • clinical skills such as taking history and performing clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal disorders
  • selection and interpretation of appropriate laboratory tests routinely used in rheumatology
  • understanding the indications, actions, and monitoring of drugs used in the treatment of rheumatic diseases

Allergology

The field of allergic diseases is a multidisciplinary specialty area and this course is provided by the Department of Dermatology and Allergic Diseases. The Diagnostic Center is going to focus on allergic skin disorders. However, we hope that this one-week course will cover both the basic and theoretical areas of allergic diseases.

The course objective is to provide basic knowledge of allergic diseases both from a theoretical perspective — etiopathogenesis, mechanisms, theories etc.; and from a practical standpoint — allergy diagnostic procedures, provocation tests, specific immunotherapy etc.

Cardiology

This course provides students with a fundamental knowledge of cardiology. The material is presented in seminars, clinical classes, and workshops. Students attend workshops in the ECHO, stress test, Holter monitoring, and thermodynamic laboratories.

Gastroenterology

The gastroenterology course takes place in the Department of Gastroenterology, Human Nutrition, and Internal Diseases.

Students work in the Gastroenterology ward with patients as well as in an outpatient clinic with patients referred by GPs to a gastroenterologist. In addition, students have the opportunity to participate in endoscopic procedures performed in the Endoscopy Unit — gastroscopy, colonoscopy, rectoscopy, ERCP etc.; and perform simple examinations such as rectal examinations.

During seminars students describe the most frequently observed gastrointestinal diseases.

In addition, students are assigned cases for presentations. Students work from patient case descriptions and perform the case analysis — including initial diagnosis, planning of additional examinations, differential diagnosis, and the final diagnosis. Students present their cases to the student group and the teaching staff, and answer questions as well as take part in the discussions following each presentation.

Nephrology

This course provides information about kidney diseases including: etiology, pathophysiology, diagnostics, and treatment. Students should have the knowledge of:

  • general physical patient examination
  • kidney anatomy and physiology
  • glomerular morphology and histology

Major nephrology topics discussed during lectures, case presentations, and training sessions in the wards are:

  • glomerulonephritis — etiology, diagnosis, clinical presentation, treatment, and morphological type
  • systemic diseases — etiology, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment
  • urinary tract infections — etiology, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment
  • autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease — etiology, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment
  • dialysis therapy — hemodialysis, intermittent peritoneal dialysis, and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis
  • renovascular hypertension

Pulmonology

The objective of this course as an integrated part of the Internal Medicine course is to provide students with basic information on the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory diseases. This rotation is designed to help students develop both a thorough understanding of and the clinical skills in gathering the patient information necessary to evaluate and manage common respiratory diseases.

Diabetology

This four-day course takes place at the Department of Internal Medicine and Diabetology. Students actively participate in seminars and small group work with the assistance of diabetology specialists.

Many topics are discussed in the seminars, e.g., the pathogenesis, classification, and treatment of diabetes, including oral agents and basic models of insulin therapy. Also covered are acute and chronic complications from the disease.

During the practical training sessions, students are presented with many cases of different diabetes types: type 1, type 2, type 3, and LADA. They encounter patients with both acute (mainly diabetic ketoacidosis) and chronic complications from diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy), and learn to suggest optimal treatment models.

Diabetology is an important subject area and the knowledge gained during this course will be useful to doctors in many different specialties.

Hypertension

During this course students learn to establish tentative diagnoses, ways to make a differential diagnosis with the use of well chosen accessory investigations, and ways to reach a final diagnosis. Students recognize the schema of the case report and other basic medical documents. The following major topics are discussed:

  • hypertension — definition and classification
  • epidemiology of hypertension
  • etiology and pathogenesis
  • secondary hypertension
  • etiology, diagnosis, and treatment
  • in-office blood pressure measurement
  • ambulatory BP measurement
  • diagnostic panel in hypertension
  • hypertensive urgencies and emergencies
  • treatment of hypertension – lifestyle changes and medication
  • special populations — with coexistent diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, angina pectoris, or hypertension in pregnancy
  • complications from hypertension
  • practical guidelines for hypertension management – JNC 7 and ESH
  • large clinical trials and why they are so important

Hematology

The course is conducted at the Hematology Department that is comprised of the Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantion Wards (with 60 beds), and at the Clinical Hematology Laboratory — in the biobank, molecular, cytogenetic, and flow cytometry labs.The course objective is to provide a base of information on blood disorders. This rotation deals with issues relevanant to all students regardless of their ultimate career choices, such as the relation of the basic sciences to the understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders, deficiency anemia, and the blood coagulation diseases. Special attention is given to the technical skills required of the modern physician like: bone marrow aspiration biopsy and trephine biopsy; ethical and moral principles; and the avoidance of pitfalls in the management of patients with malignancies. In particular, students will be expected to improve their history taking and performance of a thorough physical examination. Students will learn to think clearly about diseases in order to make an accurate diagnosis, plan a course of treatment, learn technical skills, and use the current literature that includes the medical index and hematological journals.

Nuclear Medicine

During the entire course students will learn about the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of radionuclides. The course is designed to show students what they may expect from the tests performed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine, and what are the main benefits and limitations of these diagnostic procedures. Also presented will be the indications for and contraindications to radionuclide therapy.

After completing the theoretical introduction to the basic methods students will be asked to evaluate patients referred to the department for diagnosis and treatment. Then, they will take part in the decision-making process of selecting the most appropriate method. They will observe the tests being performed, evaluate the results either with a computer or by reviewing previously prepared results, and interpret them clinically, by combining the gathered information with the patient’s history.

Clinical Pharmacology

Clinical Pharmacology is an integral part of pharmacology concerned with all clinical aspects of pharmacological treatment.

The main goals of clinical pharmacology — increased safety and efficacy of pharmacological treatment — are pursued through research and teaching.

The teaching of clinical pharmacology includes: pharmacokinetics; pharmacodynamics; adverse effects of drugs; monitoring of therapies; clinical trials with new agents; identification of the factors influencing drug action and their effects on the body — drug interactions, disease process, chronobiology, genotype, and environmental factors; and the social aspects of pharmacotherapy — pharmacoeconomics.

The curriculum focuses on clinical pharmacotherapy of cardiovascular disease, introduction to clinical pharmacogenetics, aspects of modern antibiotic use, and the basics of drug pharmacokinetics.

Family Medicine

This course introduces the main principles of family medicine. Seminars focus on the following topics: different models of general practice in Ireland, Scotland, and Poland; doctor-patient communication; the clinical approach in general practice; health education and promotion; home care; the cooperation between GPs and other elements of the national health systems; and the structure of general practice. Students participate in the daily activities of family doctors in their practice, at the ratio of one student per tutor.

Also presented are the various types of equipment, including computer programs, used in general practice.

Internal Medicine in Primary Care

The course curriculum highlights the skills necessary for recognizing and addressing the common problems in the area of internal medicine in primary medical care. During seminars, the management of, e.g., arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, acute infections, chronic diseases of the respiratory tract, and metabolic disturbances in primary care are discussed. The practical sessions are conducted in a general practitioner’s office in groups of two students. They will participate in the everyday routine of a primary care physician’s work including: taking an interview, examining, diagnosing, and treating common illnesses. Students have the opportunity to perform some procedures, such as electrocardiography, blood glucose level testing, and giving intramuscular injections. During the course some particularly interesting clinical cases will be presented and discussed.

Clinical Genetics

This course educates a physician of any specialty to be prepared for working with geneticists and with genetic outpatient clinics. During the course students should develop the understanding of the role of genetics in medicine. They should gain the basic knowledge of the structure and behavior of chromosomes and genes, the organization of the human genome, and gene mapping. They will learn about major types of genetic diseases and the mechanism of their inheritance; diagnostics – pedigree analysis, cyto-genetics, and molecular genetics; differentiation counseling; and about possible treatments. They are also taught about the molecular genetic bases of human physiological traits, e.g., sex determination, and diseases — including cancer.

Infectious Diseases

This clinical rotation provides students with the opportunity to learn about the etiology, symptoms, and treatment of various infectious diseases in children and adults. Special attention is given to AIDS and viral hepatitis. Students take histories, perform physical examinations, and present data during rounds. They also review the current techniques of laboratory investigation and the use of antimicrobial agents.

Neurology

This course presents the natural history of common neurological diseases and the diagnosis and management of these disorders. Students attend daily rounds with neurologists and participate in consultations. The learning objectives are to increase students’ ability to recognize neuropathology, to examine the patient correctly, and to use appropriate therapy. Lectures and seminars provide students with the indications for and the value of the EEG, CT, angiography, and NMR procedures.

Radiology

This course focuses on lectures and seminars illustrated with extensive teaching and active case files. In addition to a routine x-ray examination, each student learns the principles of ultrasonography, computer tomography, angio- and cardiography, and nuclear medicine, including NMR imaging. Each student group assisted by a staff member covers the basic principles of interpreting chest, abdominal, and bone radiographs by the observation and discussion of current cases. Every student is required to observe special procedures and to attend all departmental teaching conferences.

Oncology

This course summarizes the knowledge of malignant diseases obtained by students during specific clinical rotations and courses in pathology, pediatrics, internal medicine, surgery etc. Students participate in physical examinations and discuss metastasis and proliferation of the disease. They also have an opportunity to learn about the treatment and care of terminally ill patients.

Forensic Medicine

This course introduces forensic aspects of medical practice. Lectures and seminars present problems of sero-hematology, drug and chemical intoxication, and parenthood and its identification. Students have the opportunity to participate in forensic autopsies and thus get some experience in the assessment of specific injuries — gunshot wounds, penetration injuries, intoxication, and others.

Laryngology

During this clinical rotation students learn the principles of symptomology and the treatment of most common diseases related to ears, nose, throat, larynx, and esophagus. Students participate in the evaluation and treatment of outpatient clinics and hospital patients in the wards. The lectures and seminars include the relevant basic scientific material related to specific pathologies such as malignant diseases, inflammatory processes, and trauma of the upper respiratory tract and esophagus.

Tropical Diseases

The clinical parasitology course is the continuation of the basic parasitology course covered in the microbiology course. It constitutes an essential part of the infectious and parasitic diseases course. The tropical diseases course has been arranged in order to keep balance between theoretical knowledge and practical skills. It focuses on some selected syndromes and diseases that we recognize as most relevant to a future general practitioner.

Orthopedics

Students are introduced to the many facets of orthopedics: identification of fractures, management of late complications, casting techniques, and reconstructive surgery. Students prepare case histories and perform physical examinations, go on rounds, follow their patients to the operating room and throughout the postoperative care and rehabilitation.

Ophthalmology

Lectures, seminars, and clinical rotations acquaint students with the major ocular disorders in a manner that will interest primarily the candidates for general practice areas. This course covers the practical clinical aspects and the related mechanisms underlying various disorders such as: diseases of the retina and choroid, glaucoma, corneal trauma, cataracts etc. Emphasis is placed on obtaining experience in a careful examination of and first aid in post-traumatic cases.

Anesthesiology and Resuscitation

During this rotation students become familiar with the techniques and principles of intubation and the use of intravenous, arterial, central venous pressure, and of the Swan-Ganz catheters. Students also learn about: the problems occurring in postoperative and intensive care units, the pharmacology of the common anesthetic agents in the operating room, the principles of administering general and local anesthesia, and about the management of the anesthetized patient.

Dermatology

This clinical rotation helps students learn the symptomatology of most common skin diseases. During lectures and clinical presentations students learn the ways to recognize and differentiate various primary and secondary skin changes, and the ways to use specific external and internal treatments. Students are also introduced to the evaluation and treatment of venereal disease cases.

Introduction to Dentistry

This course presents the basic surgical issues of the oral and facial areas. In seminars students will learn about the symptoms of maxillofacial traumas including their diagnosis and treatment. Two seminars will focus on the diagnostic issues in benign and malignant tumors of the oral cavity and the maxillofacial area, as well as on the surgical treatment of tumors and metastatic lymph nodes. Also presented will be the possibility of reconstructions in some defects. The important part of the maxillofacial surgery is the surgical treatment of facial and orthognatic anomalies. Finally, the aspects of infections and inflammations in the orofacial region will be discussed. During the course some patient case presentations will illustrate the principles of diagnostics and treatment.

Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology

The main objective of this course is to present the specific features of the medical problems in the elderly, e.g., polipathology, politherapy, the nonspecific or unusual symptoms, and the geriatric giants. During the course students will learn how to approach and solve the medical problems present in elderly patients, within the framework of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging.

The KAROLEK dormitory

The KAROLEK dormitory

The KAROLEK dormitory – equipped with a cafeteria – is a brand new building located also very close to Eskulap, Medyk, and Aspirynka.

Its address is:
Dom Studencki Karolek
ul. Rokietnicka 5 E
60-806 Poznan
tel. + 48 61 844 52 03
e-mail: karolek@ump.edu.pl

ESKULAP

ESKULAP

ESKULAP is the largest student dormitory with accommodations for 800 students. It is a multi-story building with a student entertainment area that includes a performance hall for approx. 1,000. Nearby is also a recently opened physical fitness center offering many recreational activities and amenities.

 

The address for ESKULAP is:
Dom Studencki Eskulap
ul. Przybyszewskiego 39
60-356 Poznan
tel. + 48 61 8 54 73 93
e-mail: eskulap@ump.edu.pl

MEDYK

MEDYK

The MEDYK dormitory is close to Eskulap.

 

Its address is:
Dom Studencki Medyk
ul. Rokietnicka 4
60-806 Poznan
tel. + 48 61 658 41 18
e-mail: aspirynka@ump.edu.pl

ASPIRYNKA

ASPIRYNKA

The ASPIRYNKA dormitory is next to Medyk, and its address is:

 

Dom Studencki Aspirynka
ul. Rokietnicka 6
60-806 Poznan
tel. + 48 61 658 41 18
e-mail: aspirynka@ump.edu.pl

Witelon [Vitelo, Witeliusz]

(1230–1314) the first officially published medical doctor in Poland, author of a ten-volume Perspectiva who in Volume III covered optics and diseases of the eye in a most innovative and comprehensive scientifically way of his time, and which was later used by Mikołaj Kopernik and Leonardo da Vinci.

Mikołaj Kopernik [Nicolaus Copernicus]

(1473–1543) besides being a world-class astronomer responsible for “stopping the Sun and moving the Earth,” he was known to his contemporaries as the most prominent and modern medical doctor in Central and Eastern Europe, considered by many to be the second Aesclepios, who relied strictly on scientific approach to patient treatment and drug formulation.

 

Copernicus_Study in PL

Nicolaus Copernicus is the face of promotional campaign of the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education Ready, Study, Go! Poland

Ready, Study, Go! Poland promotional folder click here to open PDF file

Ludwik Maurycy Hirszfeld

(1814 – 1876) professor of anatomy, author of the Anatomy of the Human Body, one of the best detailed, descriptive anatomy textbooks in 19th-century Europe. He gained great acclaim for his atlas of anatomy published in France, Neurologie ou description et iconographie du systeme nerveux et des organs des sens de l’homme, avec leur mode de preparation, and became a laureate of the Parisian Academy of Sciences.

Adolf Abraham Beck

(1863 – 1942) conducted research in neurology, physiology of blood pressure and circulation, urology, and digestion. His pioneering work in electrophysiology of the brain led to the discovery of the electroencephalogram described by him in Determining Brain and Spinal Cord Localizations.

Maria Skłodowska-Curie

(1867 – 1934) eminent physicist and chemist who received two Nobel Prizes; the first one jointly with P. Curie and A. H. Becquerel for radiation research, and the second one individually for her discovery of polonium and radium. During World War I she organized 20 mobile diagnostics units equipped with x-ray machines that helped with diagnosing 10,000 wounded soldiers. Later she established 220 x-ray clinics and trained their personnel that aided over 3 million French war veterans. In 1912 she helped found and equip the first Radiology Research Institute in Warsaw.

Ludwik Hirszfeld

(1884 – 1954) surgeon, serologist, bacteriologist, epidemiologist, and immunologist who together with E. van Dungern laid the foundation for the science of blood groups naming them — 0, A, B, and AB — and who also discovered the causes for serological conflicts and the principles of blood type hereditability. He established the Polish Bacteriological Society, and through his research contributed to the creation of cytoserology that focuses on the examination of cellular antigenic properties.

Józef Struś [Josephus Strutius]

(1510 – 1568) the only Polish physician who during the Renaissance gained international fame for his ground-breaking work on the physiology and pathology of blood circulation, and the role of pulse in the diagnostic process, thoroughly described in his Sphygmicae artis iam mille ducentos annos perditae et desideratae Libri V, that was later used by William Harvey. He was regarded as the first to introduce the concept of sphygmography due to his use of graphic representations of pulse.

Jan Jonston

(1603 – 1675) author of treatises on the theoretical problems in medicine and the applications of science to medical practice in Idea universae medicinae practicae.

Jędrzej Śniadecki

(1768 – 1838) was the first in the world to identify the method for treating rickets with sunlight exposure. Also, based on his study of clinical death he published a textbook on resuscitation and reanimation methods with the use of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, tracheotomy, and electric stimulation to revive the heart and lungs. His breakthrough work The Theory of Organic Beings covered metabolism and its chemistry by explaining the role of a fixed group of elements necessary for the formation of organic matter and for sustaining life functions.

Karol Marcinkowski

(1800 – 1846) accomplished physician and patriot who was also a dedicated social activist. He worked on bringing closer together the Polish land owners, entrepreneurs, and the bourgeoisie in the framework of the concept of organic work, a movement that caught on in Wielkopolska thanks to his efforts. He created the Scientific Assistance Society in Poznań, and initiated the creation of the Polish Bazaar as a means of promoting entrepreneurial and economic growth of Polish citizens in Wielkopolska. As an excellent physician he was highly respected for his work as both a surgeon and an obstetrician in Poland, also recognized internationally for his research and work on cholera and presented with a gold medal by the French Academy of Science.

Robert Remak

(1815 – 1865) made discoveries in neurology, histology, and embryology. After his microscope observations of nerve fibers, he was the first to describe the axon and to prove that the nerve fibers of the autonomic system do not have the myelin sheath called Remak fibers. After his discovery of the autonomic nerve fibers and their function they were named the Remak’s ganglia. He discovered and described the direct (amitotic) cell division and its processes now referred to as the Remak scheme. In his research on cell division and differentiation he identified the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm in the vertebrate embryos.

Henryk Fryderyk Hoyer

(1834 – 1907) eminent histologist who opened the first histological laboratory in Poland, and who explained the details of the connective tissue, mucous membranes, bone marrow, and spleen; an embryologist who wrote A Brief Outline of the Origin and Development of the Human Body; and physician who discovered the arterio-venous anastomoses described in On Direct Connections Between Arteries and Veins.

Marceli Wilhelm Nencki

(1847 – 1901) chemist and physiologist who conducted research on the biochemistry of bacteria, uric acid, oxidation processes in organisms, and urea synthesis in the human liver. He contributed to the identification of the composition of hemin, and helped identify the relationship between chlorophyll in plants and hemoglobin in animal organisms. He is credited with creating the foundation for the biochemistry of microorganisms.

Heliodor Święcicki

( 1854 – 1923) generous philanthropist and civic activist, surgeon, obstetrician, and gynecologist deeply devoted to the medical and social welfare of the underprivileged. He initiated the creation of the social care nursing services in Poznań, and also worked tirelessly on behalf of the poor fostering their education through the a science library, and through the charitable activities of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. Through his involvement in the Poznań Society of the Friends of Science he championed many causes supporting the education and professional growth of the Polish intellectuals, scientists, medical practitioners, and the emerging student population. A prolific researcher and philosopher of medicine whose Treatise on the Aesthetics of Medicine to this day offers the best model of a modern physician’s approach towards this profession. Professor Święcicki directed the process of forming the Poznań University, became its first president in 1919, and was reelected to this post six times.

Antoni Tomasz Jurasz

(1882 – 1961) accomplished surgeon who created new surgical techniques and treatment protocols for cholelithiasis, purulent peritonitis, tumors and other esophageal diseases, and for the Basedow disease; and he also improved the surgical treatment protocols for pancreatic cysts and cardio-spasms. During World War II he served as the dean of the Polish School of Medicine in Edinburgh that educated over 200 Polish physicians in exile, and later was the director of the Department of Surgery and the head of the Polish Hospital in Edinburgh.

Janusz Zeyland

(1896 – 1944) physician and researcher in pathology and bacteriology, a pediatrician specializing in infectious diseases and epidemiology. His research conducted in Paris on the efficacy and safety of the newest methods in anti-tubercular prophylactics through the development and application of TB vaccine, also called BCG vaccine, helped save hundreds in France and in Poland. In Paris, Professor Zeyland was the recipient of the Pennetier Prize for his pioneering work on introducing the TB vaccine in pediatric patients. In Poland he is credited with opening the Central Tuberculosis Laboratory and the first-in-Poland children’s clinical ward for TB patients. He was killed by the Nazis at a Warsaw hospital during the Warsaw Uprising.

Franciszek Raszeja

(1896 – 1941) physician and teaching professor specializing in orthopedics who between 1932 and 1939 headed the Clinical Orthopedic Hospital in Poznań. Professor Raszeja was a co-founder of the Polish Orthopedic and Traumatology Society. He lost his life shot by the Nazis while tending to a patient at a home in the Warsaw ghetto.

Wiktor Marian Dega

(1896 – 1995) physician specializing in orthopedics and orthopedic surgery who introduced many innovative surgical techniques to this field. Besides orthopedic surgery, he researched and taught exercise and therapeutic exercise, and in 1960 established the first-in-the-world Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Poznań Medical Academy. In 1961 the European Chapter of WHO recognized his program of comprehensive rehabilitation at each stage of recovery as a standard model for others to follow. In 1966 he received from the International Society of Rehabilitation the esteemed Albert Lasker award — the highest honor bestowed worldwide in the area of rehabilitation.

Orientation Days

Orientation Days for students accepted to the first year for the academic year 2013/2014 will be held on August 28 (Wednesday) – September 1, 2013 (Sunday) at PUMS.

Click HERE to learn more

Dr Mencel’s lecture on March 5

Dear English Programs’ Students,

We would like to invite you to the lecture of Peter J. Mencel, MD, FACP, Medical Director of The Cancer Center of Jersey Shore University Medical Center affiliated with The Cancer Institute of New Jersey/NCI designated Cancer Center Director of Hospice Program at VNA in New Jersey, Fellowship – Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center entitled “Triple Negative Breast Cancer – Emerging Targets and Therapies” As a Model to Discuss Future Directions and Strategies for Medical Students” that will be held on March 5th, 2013 (Tuesday) from 1:00 – 2.30 p.m. in Zeylanda’s Lecture Room, Clinical Hospital at 49, Przybyszewskiego Str.

You are most welcome to come!
Best regards
The Dean’s office

Eduroam: access to a wireless network at PUMS

Dear Students,

It is our pleasure to announce that the Eduroam service is being introduced at our University. It is intended to serve as a basic medium for internet access in PUMS public locations for students and staff, as well as for users of external Eduroam-affiliated networks.

To learn more about Eduroam go to: http://eduroam.ump.edu.pl/index2.html

Please contact PUMS IT Department in all matters concerning Eduroam network using the following e-mail address: eduroam@ump.edu.pl.

Best wishes
The Dean’s Office

School Regulations for English Language Programs’ students

THESE REGULATIONS APPLY ONLY TO STUDENTS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROGRAMS. IN THE CASE OF ISSUES NOT ADDRESSED BY THEM, THE GENERAL SCHOOL REGULATIONS WILL APPLY.

Students are required to adhere to all School Regulations – especially the regulations for the students in the English language programs – that are part of the Student Guide provided to the first year students entering the University and that are also available on the University website. Any violation of the School Regulations will be subject to disciplinary action as deemed appropriate by the University authorities.

§ I.

PREPARATION OF STUDENT DOCUMENTS

The Dean’s Office requires up to seven working days for the preparation of document(s) requested by a student.

§ II.

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL YEAR

The school’s academic year starts in October and ends in June. However, the University reserves the right to extend the academic year into the months of July, August or September depending on class scheduling changes. Booking of travel tickets does not constitute a valid justification for missing mandatory University activities.

§ III.

CONDITIONS FOR THE COMPLETION OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR

At the beginning of each academic year all students are given a deadline by which they have to collect all credits and pass all examinations required for that particular academic year in order to advance to the next academic year. The deadlines are set by the Director of the Center for Medical Education in English, and students are informed about them at the beginning of each academic year.

At the end of each academic year and before the deadline, all students are required to submit to the Dean’s Office their examination card (available online at the University online database). A failure to do so will result in the loss of right to advance to the next academic year. Also, all students are required to undergo periodic medical examinations and epidemiological evaluations at the University Outpatient Clinic according to the schedule provided below:

– Advanced MD and 6-year MD Program – students are required to undergo the first periodic medical examination along with epidemiological evaluation at the end of the first year, with the second periodic medical examination to be repeated at the end of the fourth year.

– 5-year DDS Program and 6-year PharmD (or 5-year Pharmacy) Program – students are required to undergo the first periodic medical examination along with epidemiological evaluation in the second year of studies, and the second round of medical examination must be repeated in the fourth year.

– 3-year Physiotherapy Program – students are required to undergo the period medical examination along with the epidemiological evaluation at the end of the first year.

Additionally, the first-year students are required to provide the Dean’s Office with a document that proves that they have received Hepatitis B vaccination.

Satisfying these requirements is necessary for all students and it validates their eligibility for advancing to the next academic year of their studies.

If a student fails to collect all credits and pass all examinations by the set deadline, the following rules apply:

1) The first year students must complete all courses in order to advance to the next year. Failure to do so will result in a dismissal from the University.

2) Except for the first-year students, a student may repeat course(s)/year only once during the whole course of study.

3) Except for the first-year students, a student’s status may be changed to half-time or to active leave of absence.

4) In an extraordinary situation a student may be given additional time to make up the missing credits and examinations. If a student fails to meet extended deadline, his/her status could be changed to half-time or to an active leave of absence or he/she could be dismissed from the University.

The excuses for failing to attend any mandatory classes must be presented to the course coordinator and to the Dean’s Office as soon as possible, but no later than seven working days from the beginning of the absence period. Course coordinator excuses absences on the basis of documentation presented by a student. In case a student does not present the excuse, the absence period will be treated as unexcused. Any emergency situations must be reported to the course coordinator and to the Dean’s Office as soon as it is possible. In case a student is absent in more classes than the allowed number specified by the regulations for each course, that student must report immediately to the Dean’s Office in order to clarify the situation.

In case of an absence period exceeding allowed number of days caused by participation in licensing examination or job interview a student is allowed to make up for the missing classes free of charge with the other student group in the current academic year. If such making up of classes will not be possible, then a student is offered to make up the classes in the following academic year or is offered to take an individual course (for an additional fee). Student is required to report such absence at the Dean’s Office as soon as possible.

Student is required to take classes with a student group that he/she was assigned for by the Dean’s Office. In case a student unofficially changes student group or date of classes assigned primarily by the Dean’s Office, it may result in lack of crediting the classes and the necessity to make up the classes additionally and for an additional fee.

In extraordinary situations (e.g. in case students do not meet the conditions for completing the course)  a course coordinator has a right to change the form of credit for a course during the academic year after Dean’s approval.

In order to receive Dean’s approval for individual course of studies, a student is required to have a min. GPA of 4.5, have no outstanding fees and have impeccable reputation.

§ IV.

HALF-TIME STATUS

In justified situations, a student who has not collected all course credits required in a given year of study may be able to obtain credits for these courses in the next academic year, depending on the Dean’s approval. If the repeated subjects interfere with the course of study in the next academic year, the student’s status is changed to half-time. This means that the student repeats the previous year’s course(s) and simultaneously continues his/her studies with approximately half-load of the next year’s courses. The half-time course of study is designed and approved by the Director of the Center for Medical Education in English. In the following year, the student still retains half-time status and completes only the remaining courses, without the possibility of taking the courses from the higher year. In some extraordinary situations, though, the Dean may allow the student to take the next year’s courses as well.

The University reserves the right to change a student’s status into half-time if he/she is late by two weeks or more after the commencement of the academic year.

The student who was granted the half-time status is required to pay half of the tuition fee and the additional fees for the courses he/she has to retake.

The half-time status may be granted only once during the whole course of study.

§ V.

ACTIVE LEAVE OF ABSENCE STATUS

A student who has not received a maximum of three credits for courses included in the given year of studies, out of which one course may exceed 100 hours, may be able to collect those credits in the next academic year, after receiving the Dean’s approval. That student’s status is changed to an active leave of absence. This means that the student has the right to repeat the missing courses from the previous academic year without the possibility of taking the courses from the higher year. Only in some extraordinary situations, though, the Dean may allow the student to take the next year’s courses.

The student who was granted an active leave of absence is required to pay additional fees for the courses which he/she has to retake.

The active leave of absence may be granted only once during the whole course of study.

§ VI.

CHEATING IN EXAMS AND TESTS

Cheating in exams and tests is strictly prohibited. The penalty imposed on a student found cheating will be severe. Cheating in an examination will be dealt with as a disciplinary offence under these regulations. In particular, it is a disciplinary offense for a student to:

1) Use mobile phones, cameras or other electronic devices in the examination room during the examination or test.

2) Have unauthorised items or texts at his or her desk in the examination room during the examination or test.

3) Make use of unauthorized items or texts during the examination or test.

4) Copy from the script of another student during the examination or test.

5) Dishonestly receive help from another person during the examination or test.

6) Dishonestly give help to another person during the examination or test.

7) Act dishonestly in any way, whether before, during or after the examination or test, so as to obtain an unfair advantage in the examination or test.

8) Act dishonestly in any way, whether before, during or after the examination, so as to assist another student in obtaining an unfair advantage in the examination or test.

§ VII.

DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES

Student Behavior Observation Form

The University uses Student Behavior Observation Form (SBOF) where one can record unprofessional behavior of particular students. The forms will be attached to student files and the monitoring commission members appointed by the Dean will meet the student in order to discuss the problem. The student will be kept updated in the case. A report from the meeting of the monitoring commission with the student will be kept in the student’s files. If the monitoring commission does not agree with the reported objections towards the student’s behavior, the documents, namely the SBOF form and the protocol from the meeting with the monitoring commission, will not be kept in the student’s files. Receiving three and more SBOF forms can result in passing the case to the Disciplinary Commission. If, until the end of the studies, the student behaves faultlessly and the number of unprofessional incidents does not exceed two SBOF forms, the documents will be removed from the student’s file and will be destroyed before issuing of the graduation diploma.

Cheating in exams and tests

The student caught cheating in an examination or test will be dismissed from the examination or test with the failing grade. Also, a notification of this incident will be permanently placed in the student’s file. Additionally, the case may be forwarded to the Disciplinary Commission. The information of this incident may be also included in the student’s transcript and, if applicable, sent to the student’s loan provider.

Substance abuse

The University acknowledges that a person’s actions are his/her responsibility, but emphasizes that the possession, use or distribution of illegal drugs on University grounds will not be tolerated. Upon finding evidence of the unlawful possession, use or distribution of drugs on the school premises by any student, the University authorities will take appropriate disciplinary action including suspension or expulsion.

Alcoholic beverages

The possession or use of alcoholic beverages on the school campus is discouraged. Alcohol is banned at all times and under all circumstances in the University dormitories.

Upon finding evidence of violations of these policies by any student, the University authorities will take appropriate disciplinary action including suspension or expulsion.

Sexual harassment

It is the University policy that no member of the community may sexually harass another. The purpose of this policy is to foster responsible behavior in an academic and working environment that is free of discrimination.

Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance, or it creates a hostile or offensive working or academic environment. Violation of this policy is subject to disciplinary action as deemed appropriate by the University authorities, including suspension or expulsion.

Dishonesty and forgery

Forging any kind of signature, stamp or document and using such documents is a crime. The University authorities will take appropriate disciplinary action against such student and will inform law enforcement authorities about this incident.

Stalking, mobbing and emotional abuse

It is unacceptable to behave in any way that involves: stalking, mobbing, group bullying, or isolating someone using the tactics of rumor, humiliation, innuendo, discrediting or intimidating in a verbal or written form – through letters, e-mails, voice or text messages etc. Students found responsible for such acts are in violation of school policies. The University authorities will take appropriate disciplinary action including suspension or expulsion.

Life and health threatening situations

Possession of a weapon or any other life and health threatening objects is strictly not allowed at the University. In case of violation of this regulation, the University will take appropriate disciplinary actions against such student and will inform law enforcement authorities about this incident.

Copyright protection

If a student distributes copyright protected materials (including peer-to-peer sharing) in an unauthorized way, the student is subject to criminal and civil liability and disciplinary action. The department which is responsible for copyright protection policy is the Center for Medical Education in English.

Recording and unauthorized photo taking

Audio and video recording as well as taking photos of especially patients, medical staff or medical equipment by students is not allowed at the University. Violation of this policy is subject to disciplinary action as deemed appropriate by the University authorities, including suspension or expulsion.

§ VIII.

INDIVIDUAL MAKE-UP AND ADDITIONAL COURSES

All individual make-up and additional courses – that are organized specifically for a group of students or for one student – must be paid by the student(s) concerned and the fee rates are calculated as follows: the University adds 35% to the costs of the course arranged by the course coordinator and divides this amount among all course participants.

In case a student joins the classes that are already planned for the other student group, he/she pays the fee in the amount of 54 PLN/h.

Student is required to make up missing classes in the number of hours assigned to the course according to study program. Making up the classes maybe performed in decreased number of hours only upon approval of the course coordinator and Director of the Center for Medical Education in English.

§ IX.

TRANSFERS

Transfer from one English language program to another English language program at PUMS (does not concern transfer to the Advanced MD program)

A student who has begun studies at the 1st year of a given English language program, has the alternative to transfer to the 1st year of another English language program, provided that the student fulfills the following requirements:

1) The student has to undergo the admission process for the given program from the beginning.

2) The student is exempted from paying the interview fee, however has to pay the processing fee.

3) If the student is accepted to the chosen program, the student is exempted from attending and paying for the pre-study course, on condition that the student has already participated in the course (does not apply to the Advanced MD program students).

Transfer from the Polish program into the English program

The transfer from the Polish program into the English program is not permitted.

Transfer from the other University

The University does not accept transfers from the other Universities.

§ X.

CREDITS FOR CLASSES TAKEN AT PREVIOUS SCHOOL OR UNIVERSITY, REACTIVATION

It may be possible for a student to receive a credit for a course that he/she has already taken at a previous school or university. In order to arrange for such credits transfer, the student has to contact the Dean’s Office by the end of December of the given academic year, but no later than two weeks prior to the start of the course. The Dean makes a decision whether to recognize the course credits from a different school, after prior consultation with the course coordinator and with the Director of the Center for Medical Education in English. The decision can be either positive or negative. In each case the student is required to pass the final examination (NBME examination – in case of a course that ends with such examination) or final test at PUMS, in order to be granted a credit/grade for the course he/she is to be exempted from. However, the University does not provide any refunds for classes that a student is exempted from.

In case a student wants to receive credit for a course that he/she has already taken earlier at PUMS, the decision concerning the credit is made by the Dean after prior consultation with the course coordinator and the Director of the Center for Medical Education in English. However, the University does not provide any tuition refunds for courses from which a student is exempted.

As for examinations taken earlier at PUMS, a student may be exempted from such examination if the grade from the earlier examination completed at PUMS is at least 4.0 (good) or higher.

Moreover, all the student activity performed before the commencement of studies will not be accepted toward the practical summer training that the student is required to complete during the study course.

Separate regulations apply to students in the Erasmus exchange program.

Student is allowed to reactivate, according to the General School Regulations, only within 3 years from the date of withdrawal from the list of University students.

§ XI.

ELECTIVE ROTATIONS, SUMMER PRACTICAL TRAINING, ELECTIVE COURSES

ELECTIVE ROTATIONS – concerns Advanced MD program students

In order to complete the fourth year and receive a diploma, students of the Advanced MD program must have completed 16 weeks of elective rotations. The electives may be performed in a clinical area chosen by the student according to his/her interest. The electives may be completed at our University or at any other hospital (affiliated with the University) or alternatively in other medical center that has been chosen by the student (after the consent from the Director of the Center for Medical Education in English). The student may complete a research elective instead of a clinical one.

All elective rotations must be completed in the semester which a student signs up for, i.e., all 16 weeks of electives must be completed either in the fall semester or in the spring semester of the fourth year. Moreover, a student is required to inform the Dean’s Office about the place and time of the elective rotations at least 2 weeks prior to their commencement. Failure to complete an elective rotation course by a student in an appointed semester is treated as unexcused absence.

If a student fails to pass an elective rotation course, the student is required to repeat the elective course from the same clinical field that he/she chose previously.

Electives completed at a University hospital which is not a clinical hospital affiliated with the Poznan University of Medical Sciences

It is the responsibility of the student to apply to a chosen University for the elective rotation. The student must apply through the PUMS Dean’s Office in order to receive credit for these electives. The student fills out all the appropriate application documents, as required by the particular University, and attaches an Elective Evaluation form, available on the University website, which must be completed by the elective rotation supervisor at the end of the elective rotation.

This form must bear a given University’s seal/stamp confirming the completion of the elective at that University. Should that institution not have a seal or stamp available, it must furnish an official statement on its letterhead containing the following information: (a) student’s name and surname, (b) elective title/subject, (c) dates and length of that elective. This letter must be signed and dated by the elective supervisor. Once completed and properly filled out, the original elective evaluation form – with the seal/stamp or accompanying letter from elective supervisor – must be sent directly to the Dean’s Office from the University where the elective was taken. This allows the graduating student to receive due credits and to receive his/her graduation diploma. In some extraordinary situations there is a possibility to receive credit for elective rotations based on the elective evaluation form from the medical center where the electives were performed in case such center refuses to fill out the PUMS elective evaluation form.

It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with a particular country’s or state’s requirements at the place where he/she is planning to do his/her residency, with respect to the maximum number of weeks of electives that could be completed outside of PUMS.

Please note that in order to take a residency in the state of New York, students are allowed a maximum of 12 weeks of electives in that state and the remaining 4 weeks must be completed at PUMS.

Elective rotations completed at the Poznan University of Medical Sciences

If a student decides to do his/her electives at PUMS, he/she is obliged to arrange for them on his/her own. The student should contact a teaching assistant in the chosen University department and make arrangements directly with the elective supervisor. Then, the student must write an official letter to the Dean requesting his/her approval. This letter should be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the elective rotation. It should specify the following: name of elective coordinator, department name, dates of instruction, number of weeks and scope of instruction – and it must have been signed and approved by the elective supervisor. Following the Dean’s approval, the student may start the elective. Afterwards, in order for the student to receive the credit for the elective rotation, the Dean’s Office must receive a complete and properly filled out original elective evaluation form from the elective supervisor.

SUMMER PRACTICAL TRAINING (concerns students of the 6-year MD program, 5-year DDS program, 6-year PharmD program and 3-year Physiotherapy program)

Students are required to do their summer practical training according to their study schedule. Summer practical training must be completed during summer months. It cannot be performed at the same time as regular classes. Summer practical training can be completed at PUMS or outside PUMS.

ELECTIVE COURSES (concerns students of the 6-year MD program, 5-year DDS program, 6-year PharmD program and 3-year Physiotherapy program)

If a student wants to sign up for elective courses, he/she has to fill out the online form available at the following website: https://uczelnia.ump.edu.pl. The courses take place at PUMS. A students has a certain number of ECTS points for elective courses at his/her disposal assigned to him/her by the Dean’s Office. It is a difference between number of points required to receive credit for the whole academic year and the number of points obtained from the required courses. A student may sign up only for the courses the Dean’s Office entitled him/her for. Elective course will take place and signing up for it is effective in case: (a) at least 12 students sign up for the elective course or (b) at least 50% of students entitled by the Dean’s Office to take the course, signs up for it. Detailed regulations concerning elective courses are available on the website where a student signs up for elective courses.

§ XII.

TRANSCRIPTS

Every student/ graduate is entitled to receive up to five transcripts free of charge throughout the academic year. Each additional transcript costs 30 PLN, payable to the individual student University subaccount. Transcripts are preferably sent directly to the institution appointed by the student. In justified cases, the transcripts may be given to the student but only in a sealed envelope. The student may receive only a transcript copy bearing the “unofficial” stamp.

§XIII.

INSURANCE, STUDENT VISA AND TEMPORARY STAY CARD

It is the student’s responsibility to arrive in Poznan with a health insurance policy valid in Poland. All students at the Poznan University of Medical Sciences are obliged to have an insurance policy which entitles them to use the services of the Polish medical healthcare system. A student’s failure to obtain such a health insurance policy absolves the University from responsibility for covering the cost of a student’s medical treatment in Poland. Furthermore, all first-year students are required to deliver the certificate of valid health insurance to the Dean’s Office no later than December 30th of their first academic year.

Also, each student is obligated to legalize his/her stay in Poland and deliver to the Dean’s Office a copy of his/her valid student visa or temporary stay card by December 30th of their first academic year. If and when the visa or temporary stay card expires, the student is required to provide the Dean’s Office with a photocopy of a new document which proves that his/her stay in Poland is legal.

§ XIV.

COMMISSION EXAMINATIONS, NBME EXAMINATIONS, USMLE EXAMINATIONS AND RESIDENCIES

Commission examinations

1) A student who questions the fairness of an examination has the right to apply to the Dean, within seven working days following the results announcement of the examination, for an examination by the presence of a commission. In his/her application the student must provide a detailed description of the irregularities experienced during the examination. The decision of granting the permission to attend a commission examination is made by the Dean, after reviewing the student’s application.

2) The commission examination consists of two parts – written and oral.

a) Written part contains five randomly selected questions. The student is supposed to provide essay-type answers. To pass this part the student has to provide at least three fully satisfactory answers. The percentage threshold for passing a test cannot be lower than 60%. Failing the written part results in not being admitted to take the oral part, and, consequently, in failing the commission examination.

b) The oral part consists of five randomly selected questions. The student is supposed to answer these questions in front of the commission. To pass this part the student has to provide at least three fully satisfactory answers.

The passing of both parts – written and oral – is necessary to pass the commission examination.

In extraordinary situations, commission examination may be performed in a form of a practical examination. The type of examination is determined by the Dean.

3) If necessary, the commission examination may be ordered and initiated by the Dean.

4) The date of the commission examination is set by the Dean no later than fourteen days following the submission of the student’s appeal to the Dean’s Office requesting the examination by a commission.

5) The examining commission that conducts the examination is appointed by the Dean and consists of:

a) the Dean or his/her designate as chairperson,

b) an academic teacher entitled to conduct examination,

c) the examiner who conducted the previous examination as an observer with an advisory vote,

d) other academic teacher entitled to conduct examination, who represents the same discipline, or one closely related to it,

e) at the student’s request, as observers, a tutor for the given year of study or a representative of the student government.

6) The examiner who conducted the previous examination cannot be the head of the commission.

7) At the student’s request the Dean may appoint a person identified by the student to be the other specialist mentioned in item 5c) above.

8) The result of the commission examination is final.

NBME Comprehensive Basic Science Examination (concerns medical students only)

NBME Comprehensive Basic Science Examination (CBSE) or its equivalent is the examination that ends the basic sciences portion of studies. It is an obligatory examination for all students. The first attempt of the CBS examination takes place after the end of the Basic Science Review Course. The results of the examination are included in the grade transcript in the form of the number of points scored.

Passing the CBS examination is the requirement for the commencement of the clinical sciences portion of the studies. Number of points required to pass the CBS examination will be announced yearly in the Directive of the Program Board of the Center for Medical Education in English. Students are required to take the CBS examination on the day appointed by the Dean’s Office.
Students who meet the criteria for applying for USMLE Step 1 examination (see details below) can also be allowed to commence the clinical portion of studies based on this criteria.
There is a possibility to receive an approval for commencement of clinical sciences portion of the studies in a different mode. The details regarding this mode will be announced annually in the Directive of the Board of the Center for Medical Education in English at the beginning of each academic year (this section applies to students who begin their studies in the academic year 2012/2013 and in the consecutive academic years).

Certification of USMLE Step 1 application (concerns medical students only)

The application for USMLE Step 1 will be signed by the Dean after a student completes all basic sciences courses from the curriculum (which means obtaining all credits and passing all required examinations) and also passes (according to passing USMLE Step 1 criteria) NBME Comprehensive Basic Science (CBS) examination which completes the basic sciences component in the University curriculum. The CBS examination will be scheduled after completion of all basic sciences courses.

A result of the CBS examination on the level of at least the predicted passing threshold for the USMLE Step 1 examination for the given academic year, allows the students, who are willing to take the licensing examination (e.g. USMLE Step 1), to obtain the permission from the Dean to take the licensing examination. In that case, the Dean will sign the appropriate documents that allow a student to take the licensing examination. A student has the right to improve the result of the CBS examination twice. If a student does not obtain the required number of points in any examination attempt, the permission to take the licensing examinations will be granted only after the student has obtained the graduation diploma.

For outstanding students there will be a possibility to apply for USMLE Step 1 earlier, prior to taking NBME Comprehensive Basic Science examination. The conditions for meeting this criteria will be announced annually in the Directive of the Board of the Center for Medical Education in English at the beginning of each academic year.

Please note that when applying on-line for any Step of the USMLE, the student has to choose in the field ‘MEDICAL SCHOOL’ – POZNAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, CENTER FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION IN ENGLISH, and NOT: MEDICAL FACULTY I. The applications with “MEDICAL FACULTY I” will not be authorized by the Dean.

The application for USMLE Step 2 will be authorized only after passing the USMLE Step 1.

Student/graduate is required to provide the University with the result of USMLE examinations.

Rules and regulations for NBME examinations pertinent to all medical students:

1) The NBME examinations are mandatory and can be administered on Saturdays, due to the amount of time required to take them and to eliminate the possibility of interfering with the class schedules. In some extraordinary situations NBME examinations can be taken at weekdays in the late afternoon. Moreover, NBME examinations can take place only at the University premises.

2) The NBME examinations will be scheduled preferably one week after the end of the course. Examinations scheduled for the end of each semester can be taken earlier, i.e., on the first Saturday after the end of the course. Students who leave for vacation before obtaining scores and who have failed will be required to adhere to the examination make up dates set by the course coordinator.

3) Registration for the NBME examination from a given subject is available online after logging in at https://uczelnia.ump.edu.pl. A student can register for two dates of the NBME examination from a given subject. The procedure is as follows:

– a student will be automatically assigned to the first date for his or her group/year/program for the NBME examination from a given subject, according to the examination schedule suggested and approved by the Dean’s Office,

– up to 26 days prior to the examination day a student has the right to change the examination date by choosing a different one from the dates appointed by the Dean’s Office; after that time the only possibility of changing the date will be available if the student presents valid excuse (e.g. taking the USMLE examination); such request has to be send to the e-mail address of the coordinator of the particular course and to the e-mail address of the administrative assistant responsible for the appropriate year/program at the Dean’s Office; the final decision regarding change of examination date will be made after having consulted one of the Associate Deans of the Center for Medical Education in English,

– if a student is not present at the examination that a student has registered for, a student is charged with the examination fee and receives the unsatisfactory grade for that attempt,

– if a student presents a valid excuse from the examination in the form of a physician’s note, a student may register for another date, after receiving approval from the course coordinator and the Dean’s Office,

– the Dean’s Office requires the right to change the date of NBME examination in case 20 days prior to the examination the number of students assigned to the particular date of examination is lower than 10.

4) Students may be admitted to take the NBME examination only after having received the course coordinator’s approval. Should there be any administrative issue, the student may be conditionally allowed to take the examination, but the scores will be released only after those issues have been resolved.

5) Students must bring their ID card to the examination.

6) Students must be present at least 30 minutes before the exam. Student who arrives more than 30 minutes late will not be allowed to take the examination and will receive a failing grade.

7) Students are not allowed to bring any personal belongings to the examination room – including cell phones, watches, computers or any other electronic devices, as well as food or beverages.

8) Students may be dismissed from the examination with a failing grade in the following circumstances:

– if caught cheating during the examination (see § VI and VII)

– if behaving improperly

– if engaging in any conversation with other exam takers during the examination period

– if caught possessing any personal belongings which are listed in item 7, according to § VI.

9) Only one student at a time may be allowed to leave for the restroom.

10) Students who finish the examination earlier may leave the examination room.

11) If a student is not present at the examination (unless excused for medical reasons – according to § 31 of the General School Regulations); or if the student does not pass the NBME examination, then the student must take the examination provided by the course coordinator on a date arranged with him/her. In case of an unexcused absence, a student receives failing grade and/or 0 points from the first attempt. Any emergency situations must be reported to the course coordinator as soon as possible.

12) The make up examinations are departmental examinations (does not apply to the NBME Comprehensive Basic Science Examination – CBS) and may be graded for the maximum score of 4.0 (good).

13) It is possible for a student to retake the NBME examination again, but only at the end of the repeated course.

14) The passing grade and the grading system are determined by the course coordinator based on the scores released by NBME. The NBME examination grade may not be equal to the final course grade.

15) Any changes to the NBME examination schedule are possible within three weeks from the release of the NBME schedule to the students, and only through a written notice delivered to the Dean’s Office by class representatives.

16) If a student is not present at the NBME examination (unless excused for medical reasons – according to § 31 of the General School Regulations); he/she will have to cover the cost of this examination which is equal to the cost of purchasing one examination for a student from NBME by the University.

17) The examination room where NBME examinations are administered is under video surveillance.

18) In case of courses that finish with NBME examination, it is the first examination attempt. For students who take prior to NBME examination the make-up examination, NBME examination is counted as failed (in that case first examination attempt is 2.0).

19) In case of Erasmus students, they are not required to take NBME examinations. However, if Erasmus student is interested in taking NBME examination, he/she is required to inform course coordinator and the Dean’s Office about this fact at least 7 days prior to the examination date. In case of Erasmus students who do not take NBME examinations, it is the course coordinator who decides about the form of the examination.

Dental Comprehensive Basic Science Examination – DCBSE (concerns DDS students):

The Dental Comprehensive Basic Science Examination evaluates the knowledge and the student’s degree of preparedness for the Part 1 of the National Board Dental Examination, NBDE.

In order to complete the fourth year of the DDS program all students must satisfy the following requirement:

• Take the Dental Comprehensive Basic Science Examination after completing the third year or during the fourth year. The examination score will be recorded in the student’s transcript. This examination concludes the basic sciences component of the curriculum (this regulation applies to students who started their studies in the academic year 2011/2012 or later)

§ XV.

PERSONAL DATA PROTECTION

According to the policy on protection of personal information, the Dean’s Office does not disclose the information regarding students and their academic progress to any third party – including parents – without the student’s formal written consent.

§ XVI.

ELECTRONIC MAIL AT THE UNIVERSITY SERVER

Electronic mail is the official University staff communication channel with students. Each student receives his/her own e-mail account at the University server where information from the University is sent to. All comments or questions related to functioning of the electronic mail should be sent to technicalsupport@ump.edu.pl. Timely reception of the information sent via electronic mail is students’ sole responsibility (students are strongly advised to check their e-mail account and read the e-mails at least twice a week). Redirecting messages sent to the University electronic mail account to any personal electronic mail account is not permitted.

§ XVII.

TUITION FEE REFUND POLICY

The resigning student is entitled to the return of the tuition fee – reduced by 1/9 or 1/10 (depending on the number of months of studies scheduled for classes in the academic year in question) for each commenced month of the studies within the period covered by the payment and by the handling fee amounting to 5% of the paid tuition. The resignation date is the date of receiving by the University the student’s written resignation statement.

In all withdrawal cases of students who have an outstanding United States Government Guaranteed Loan, the Notice of Withdrawal will be sent promptly to the lender and to the approving agency.

§ XVIII.

PROFESSIONALISM AND DRESS CODE

It is important to dress and behave in a way that shows respect to faculty members, fellow classmates, medical and administrative staff, and patients whom the students have contact.

Professionalism

Students are required to:

o respect other people’s rights to privacy and dignity

o knock and wait for a response before entering closed rooms

o discuss confidential or sensitive information about patients only with other medical professionals involved in the diagnostic and treatment processes

o be tolerant of cultural differences

o wear a name badge or a name tag so that the student’s name is clearly visible at all times

o refrain from eating, drinking and gum chewing during lectures, seminars, classes, laboratories and clinics as well as any official ceremonies that take place at the University

o avoid personal conversations with fellow students in the patients’ presence

o refrain from making inappropriate or negative comments about patients, teachers, fellow students, or physicians

o wear lab coats in the clinical areas during contact with patients

Dress Code and Hygiene

This dress code is intended to contribute to the overall professional student development, and to make the students aware of the standards of professional attire that should be followed, in order for them to make a more effective transition to the professional workplace requirements. In addition, the dress code seeks to improve the overall appearance of enrolled students.

Students must keep in mind that it is expected of them to display an appropriate level of personal hygiene, grooming and dress. At no time would the following items of clothing or clothing style be acceptable for students attending classes:

o hats, caps or other head cover worn inside buildings, though wearing these items for medical or religious reasons is acceptable

o sunglasses inside building

o crop tops and other bare midriff tops, including spaghetti strap blouses

o shorts

o athletic type, wide strap tank tops that expose chest, back, torso or midsection

o any clothing with holes and cuts, i.e., jeans, shirts, tops, etc.

o suggestive, revealing or tight-fitting clothing, or clothing with inappropriate pictures or slogans

o wrinkled, dirty or unsafe attire

o extreme personal presentation of any type, e.g. body piercing, hairstyle or tattoos

o bare feet, thongs (beach footwear), or flip flops.

The above dress code should be adhered to on a daily basis by all students in a formal classroom setting. In addition, certain classes may have a specific dress code requirements for laboratory classes, surgery training sessions etc. which are described in the course syllabus. Also, students are required to dress professionally and to wear their white coats when interacting with patients.

The daily hygiene is required.

Dress code for exams is smart.

Students need to remember that patient safety is of the highest importance, and that at no time should patients be put at any risk. Therefore, students behaving poorly and whose state of their own health could cause harm to the patients and the public may be dismissed from the University.

§ XIX.

AWARDS

The President of the Poznan University of Medical Sciences has established the following awards for the students in the English Language Programs:

First degree award – Wanda Błeńska Award

Second degree award – Heliodor Święcicki Award

Third degree award – President’s Award

Fourth degree award – University Award

1) These awards are granted in recognition of students’ high academic accomplishments. The recipients have to maintain a high grade average (cumulative GPA) in the preceding academic year. The number of students receiving awards, their amount, and the choice of awards are determined by the Director of the Center for Medical Education in English, and are approved by the University President. It is possible that not all students who meet the award criteria receive it, for it is reserved only for the very best of all students considered.

2) Awards recipients have to meet the following requirements:

a) have collected all credits and passed all examinations required in a given academic year on first attempt and by the deadline, have maintained a grade point average not lower than 4.5 and have submitted their examination card to the Dean’s Office within the set deadline;

b) have contributed to the development of students activities (e.g. student organizations, student societies, volunteer organizations, sports activities, and to the international reputation of the University);

c) have demonstrated a respectful attitude towards all members of the academic staff and the administrative personnel;

d) must not be in arrears with University fees.

3) Students who are repeating (or have repeated) a course are not eligible for an award.

4) Awards may only be paid from the University’s fee-derived sources.

There is also a possibility to award students for the active participation in academic life, for outstanding sports activities (confirmed in writing by the PUMS Physical Training department manager), for receiving the highest scores on the USMLE Steps 1 and Step 2 and for other types of outstanding accomplishments. The decisions related to these awards are made by the Director of the Center for Medical Education in English.

§ XX.

GRADUATION DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS

In order to receive a medical diploma, students are required to submit the following documents to the Dean’s Office:

1) diploma supplement questionnaire, available on the University website or at the Dean’s Office

2) graduation form with all necessary stamps and signatures, available on the University’s website or at the Dean’s Office

3) seven diploma photos, size: 45 mm x 65 mm

4) properly filled out elective rotation evaluation forms with a University’s seal, if applicable

5) passport photocopy

6) summer practical training booklet, if applicable

7) US match or SOAP result confirmation (concerns students who apply for residency in the USA)

8) confirmation of residency placement or information about place of work (if applicable)

9) diploma payment confirmation

Each student must submit all completed examination cards from all years with index (starting from the academic year 2014/2015 examination cards are available at the University online database) and must have paid all University fees prior to receiving the graduation diploma.

After receiving all of the required documents listed above, the Dean’s Office requires 20 working days for the preparation of each student’s medical diploma.

Earlier issuing of the diploma, which is connected to making up the classes individually, is possible only after approval from the course coordinator(s) and the Director of the Center for Medical Education in English.

§ XXI.

PROBLEM SOLVING AND DECISION-MAKING PROCESS

In the case of any misunderstanding or concerns, students should seek advice from the University authorities following the hierarchy order provided below:

1) Teacher Assistant

2) Course Coordinator

3) Associate Dean

4) Dean

5) Vice-President for Student Affairs

6) President

Each student is entitled to appeal in writing against the Dean’s decision to the President within 14 days from the date of announcement or receipt of that decision.

§ XXII.

Study fees, including tuition fees and dormitory fees, are settled by individual agreements with students and by the President’s regulations.

§ XXIII.

The above regulations are in effect and binding starting from the academic year 2015/2016.

 

 

General School Regulations

I. GENERAL REGULATIONS

§ 1

1. The School Regulations hereinafter referred to as “Regulations” determine organization and course of study as well as rights and duties related to them and pertaining to the students of Poznan University of Medical Sciences (PUMS) hereinafter referred to as “Medical University”.

2. These regulations concern all types of studies and fields of study offered by Poznan University of Medical Sciences excluding postgraduate and third-cycle (Ph.D.) programs to which separate regulations apply. These regulations shall apply accordingly to students in the English Language Programs at PUMS subject to the provisions governing the course of studies pursued by them (School Regulations for Students in the English Language Programs).

3. Poznan University of Medical Sciences has a University Education Quality Improvement and Assurance System whose operating principles are governed by separate regulations.

§ 2

1. Students are admitted to the University after taking an oath before the President of the University or a Dean.

2. The primary teaching language at Poznan University of Medical Sciences is Polish. There can be organized and held classes and tests of knowledge or skills, as well as diploma examinations, in a foreign language at the University. The scope and conditions for holding classes in a foreign language are determined by the Rector’s resolution.

§ 3

1. The President of the University has authority over all students.

2. The Dean has authority over all students within a particular faculty.

§ 4

1. The decisions related to the curriculum are made by the Dean.

2. A formal petition submitted to the Dean needs to include a documented justification

3. The decision communicated to the student should include instructions on all possible means of appeal.

4. The Dean’s decision is subject to appeal to the University President within the scope of matters covered by the regulations.

5. The right to appeal within 14 days is granted to the student as well as to the bodies of the Student Government that need to appeal through the Dean who then, as an intermediary, attaches to the appeal his/her written opinion.

§ 5

1. The Dean after consultation with the Dean’s Council makes decisions in cases concerning the specific regulations for the organizational procedures and the pursuit of studies not included in the present regulations.

§ 6

1. All University students comprise Student Government (self-government), whose elected bodies have the exclusive right to represent the whole student community and to protect students’ rights.

2. The rules for the organization and functioning of the Student Government, the ways of electing its bodies, and their competencies are determined by the Student Government Regulations and by the University Students’ Representative Council Regulations.

3. Student organizations have the right, within the realm of their statutory activity, to present proposals to the University’s elected bodies concerning matters related to their members.

II. STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

§ 7

Each student has the right to:

1) entering student has the right to undergo a training covering student rights and duties. The training is carried out by the University Student Government in agreement with the Students’ Parliament of the Republic of Poland,

2) develop his/her own scientific, community-related, cultural, tourist and sports interests on PUMS premises with the use of University equipment and facilities, and with the assistance of University teachers and bodies of Medical University,

3) join any of the scientific student associations and participate, with the approval of the researchers, in the University-run research projects,

4) receive awards and honors as specified by relevant regulations,

5) follow an individual plan or organization of studies based on an individualized curriculum and syllabus according to the regulations of the Faculty Board,

6) affiliate with different organizations as determined by the provisions defined by separate regulations,

7) express opinions and present views regarding the functioning of the University, the curricula and syllabi, the course of study, and other matters concerning the educational process to bodies of Student Government and organizational units of the Medical University,

8) receive financial aid in accordance with appropriate regulations and apply for accommodation in the University dormitories,

9) take part in open courses within other areas of academic study,

10) be treated as partners by all members of University staff,

11) evaluate the courses and the performance of the teaching faculty,

12) have the teaching process carried out accordingly, with particular attention paid to special needs of disabled students.

§ 8

1. Each student is obligated to take full advantage of the opportunity to learn and study offered by the University. Each student has the responsibility to:

1) acquire the knowledge and skills necessary for his/her future professional career,

2) fulfill all of the academic requirements as determined by the curriculum and the student regulations, including: attending teaching and organizational activities according to the School Regulations, taking examinations, undergoing training practices and fulfilling requirements as defined in the course of study,

3) abide by the student oath, School Regulations and all internal regulations of the Poznan University of Medical Sciences, as well as of hospitals/clinical wards during the classes that are conducted there,

4) care for the good name of the Medical University and adhere to the ethical standards of the academic community.

2. Each student has also the responsibility to:

1) observe the socially accepted standards of conduct,

2) adhere to the principles of professional ethics,

3) respect other people’s rights to privacy and dignity,

4) be tolerant of cultural differences,

5) display an appropriate level of personal hygiene, grooming and dress, as well as wear specific protective clothing during designated laboratory or clinical classes.

3. A students is required to:

1) pay fees determined by the University in a timely manner,

2) undergo the following examinations required by Poznan University of Medical Sciences in a timely manner, in accordance with separate regulations:

a) medical examination – in order to obtain a medical certificate confirming the student’s ability to participate in didactic classes during which he or she is or may be exposed to harmful, cumbersome or hazardous health agents,

b) sanitary-epidemiological examination and vaccinations (if the student has not been previously vaccinated) – which are required in order to participate in classes during which there is a possibility of transmission of an infection or a disease to other persons,

3) wear a name badge or a name tag so that the student’s first and last name is clearly visible at all times,

4) refrain from using any electronic devices during classes for other than educational purposes.

4. The University stresses the importance of appropriate dress and behavior that show respect to faculty members, fellow classmates, medical and administrative staff, and patients whom the students have contact. Dress code for examinations is smart.

A students is also required to:

1) discuss confidential or sensitive information about patients only with other medical professionals involved in the diagnostic and treatment processes,

2) avoid personal conversations with fellow students in the patients’ presence,

3) refrain from eating, drinking and gum chewing during lectures, seminars, classes, laboratories and clinics as well as any official ceremonies that take place at the University.

§ 9

1. The rules pertaining to students’ disciplinary accountability and University’s disciplinary procedures are determined in separate regulations.

2. Forging any kind of signature, stamp or document and using such documents is a crime. The University authorities will take appropriate disciplinary action against such student and will inform law enforcement authorities about this incident.

3. Audio and video recording by students is not allowed at the University unless an academic teacher delivering a class has given his/ her prior consent for that. The University strictly prohibits audio and video recording by students also during clinical classes with patients treated in the unit where the classes are held. Violation of this policy is subject to disciplinary action as deemed appropriate by the University authorities, including suspension or expulsion.

§ 10

1. Each student has to notify immediately:

1) the Dean’s Office of any changes in his/her name, marital status, as well as residence and mailing addresses, telephone number and email address;

2) the University Office for Students’ Affairs (Translator’s note: Bursary Office of the Center for Medical Education in English for English Programs’ students) of any changes in his/her financial situation, especially if they affect the eligibility for financial aid or its amount.

2. If the student fails to inform the Dean’s Office about a change in his or her address, it is assumed that all correspondence sent to the last address that the student informed about is treated as effectively delivered.2. If the student fails to inform the Dean’s Office about a change in his or her address, it is assumed that all correspondence sent to the last address that the student informed about is treated as effectively delivered.

§ 11

1. A student may transfer to another university from PUMS upon receiving the acceptance, announced in the form of decision, from the Dean of the receiving school, and provided that the student has fulfilled all of the requirements and obligations governed by the regulations of the university he/she intends to leave, i.e., PUMS.

2. After completing the first year of studies, a student from another university may apply for admission to the same field and mode of study at PUMS.

3. A PUMS student may change the field of study after completing the first year of study.

4. A transfer in the course of a academic year is possible only in special cases, as foreseen in section 2 and 3.

§ 11a

1. A student of a different university may transfer to Poznan University of Medical Sciences (§ 11 sec. 2) provided that:

1) the student fulfills the acceptance criteria at the Faculty that the student applies to in the year that the student enters the enrollment process,

2) the student has obtained a grade point average of at least 4.0 from the courses that end with an examination and no fewer than 30 ECTS points for passing each of the semesters that the student has completed so far,

3) when transferring to the medical or dental program, there are available places within the limit for the particular academic year, as determined by the Polish Minister of Health, pursuant to the Polish Act on Higher Education,

4) there are no ongoing disciplinary proceedings conducted against the student, and the student has not been punished in the course of a disciplinary proceeding before,

5) the student has fulfilled all the obligations towards the university that the student is leaving,

6) Poznan University of Medical Sciences has sufficient financial and didactic means,

7) the student signs a relevant agreement with Poznan University of Medical Sciences.

2. The provisions of paragraphs 1 shall apply mutatis mutandis, if a student transfers to another study program, as provided for in §11 sec. 3.

§ 11 b

1. The decisions which are mentioned in §11 sec. 1-3 above are made by the Dean of the relevant faculty. The decisions provided for in § 11 sec. 2 and 3 require a prior opinion of the Dean’s Council.

2. The deadline for submitting transfer applications mentioned in § 11 sec. 2 and 3 is appointed by the Dean of the relevant faculty, and this information is published on the University website by the end of July of a given year.

3. A student who applies for a transfer as provided for in § 11 sec. 2 should submit the application together with the following documents:

1) an approval of the transfer signed by the Dean of the parent faculty,

2) a transcript of records from the course of studies, including the obtained grades and ECTS points used, as well as the GPA from the completed years of studies,

3) a certified copy of the enrollment decision,

4) a copy of the high school diploma,

5) a list of courses completed during the current course of studies according to the template determined by the Dean of the relevant faculty, published on the University website at a time as provided for in sec. 2,

6) a statement by the student that he or she has no record of either disciplinary actions taken or current ongoing disciplinary proceedings against him or her.

4. The provisions of sec. 3 are accordingly applied to the application of a student who wishes to transfer to another study program, according to the provisions of § 11 sec. 3.

5. The decisions as provided for in § 11 sec. 2 and 3 should be made by 30 September of a given year.

6. The decision as provided for in § 11 sec. 2 and 3 should include:

1) the year of studies that the student is transferred to,

2) a list of completed courses together with the grades and ECTS points, while the number of points corresponding to given learning outcomes at the faculty that the student is transferred to is crucial when determining the number of the ECTS points granted,

3) an overview of differences in the curricula which the student has to make up for, as well as the deadlines and costs of such making up,

4) an information on the tuition fee in the case of extramural studies.

7. The decision of the Dean can appealed to the Rector of Poznan University of Medical Sciences.

§ 11 c

1. A student of the last year of long cycle part-time program in Medicine, Dentistry and Laboratory Medicine can, with the consent of the Dean, transfer to full-time studies in the last semester of studies.

2. A student of part-time studies in Pharmacy can, with the consent of the Dean, transfer to full-time studies for the period of the tenth semester of studies and the six months of professional training.

§ 11 d

1. A student has the right to transfer and have his credits recognized by an organizational unit of Poznan University of Medical Sciences or another university, including foreign universities, according to the rules for transfer of credits.

2. A student who wants to transfer credits from a university other than Poznan University of Medical Sciences, including foreign universities, with the ECTS points assigned, the credits are regarded as records expressed with ECTS points awarded by Poznan University of Medical Sciences.

 

III. ORGANIZATION OF STUDIES

§ 12

1. The academic year begins no later than October 1 and ends no later than September 30 of the next calendar year unless the University President declares otherwise.

2. The winter, spring, and summer vacation breaks last not less than 6 weeks in total including at least 4 weeks of a continuous summer vacation break. The mandatory training practices must be held at some other times than the vacation breaks. This rule does not apply to outgoing PUMS students participating in three-month vacation training practices as part of the European Student Exchange Program.

3. The specific schedule for each academic year is determined by the University President after consultation with University representatives of the Student Government, and this information is released by March 31 of the preceding academic year.

4. During the academic year the President may declare days and hours off on his own initiative or when petitioned by the University Students’ Representative Council.

5. The Dean may declare hours off on his own initiative or when petitioned by the University Students’ Representative Council.

§ 13

1. The studies are organized according to the curricula and syllabi adopted by the Faculty Board after consultation with the University Students’ Representative Council (Rada Uczelniana Samorządu Studenckiego – RUSS).

In case of necessity of carrying out studies based on a new curriculum, the Dean may set the conditions for completing the unfulfilled requirements resulting from outstanding programmatic differences in the respective curricula and syllabi.

2. ECTS credit points are allocated to curricular courses completed by a student.

3. To receive the diploma upon completion of first cycle program a student is required to collect at least 180 ECTS credit points, upon completion of second cycle program a student is required to collect at least 90 ECTS credit points, upon completion of long cycle studies a student is required to collect at least 300 ECTS credit points in the five-year program, and 360 ECTS credit points in the six-year program.

4. Each faculty appoints Program Councils for particular fields of study.

5. The curricula include specifically:

1) the description of learning effects for specific main field of study, level of qualification and field of educational profile,

2) the titles of all mandatory and optional courses together with the number of hours involved in each course; the number of hours is also provided in the ECTS credit points;

3) course/ module syllabus, specifically including:

a. the basic program content of each course/ module,

b. implementation mode for each course/ module (lectures, practical classes, seminars, tutorials, laboratory classes and other),

c. course/ module evaluation criteria and methods;

4) training practice duration and scope, and the number of the ECTS credit points involved.

4) the organizational details for each course — lectures, practical classes, seminars, laboratories etc.;

5) training practice duration and scope, and the number of the ECTS credit points involved,

6. The teaching programs determine specifically:

1) the level of qualification (first and second cycle programs) and mode of study (full-time and part-time programs),

2) the length of program including numbers of semesters,

3) the modules/ courses taught and training practices carried out in each semester and each year of study,

4) mode of completing the modules/ courses.

7. The presence of a student in curricular classes is mandatory. In exceptional circumstances a student is allowed to have excused absence from part of the mandatory classes in a respective course, for which completion a credit is given in accordance with the course regulations.

8. The absence from classes of students who are members of collective and electoral bodies as well as their committees, due to their participation in those bodies’ works is excused during their respective meetings; and students do not need to make up for the classes missed. The students should be given an opportunity to take an end-term test or an examination at other times.

9. Classes can be delivered with the use of distance learning techniques. Delivering classes with the use of distance learning techniques is determined by the provisions defined by separate regulations.

§ 14

1. Students are obligated to choose elective courses from the syllabus.

2. Students have the right to choose elective courses apart from their scheduled curricular classes.

3. The only valid means of registration for elective courses is submission of the appropriate form using the SIGN UP on-line system as determined by the provisions defined by separate regulations.

4. Participation in the chosen elective courses is mandatory and the conditions for their completion are stated in the regulations of particular elective courses with the provision that the attendance cannot be the only form of assessment.

§ 15

1. A detailed and complete class timetable, including division into student groups (excluding the first year of study) — prepared in cooperation with the Student Government — is released at least two weeks before the beginning of each semester on the University website as well as on bulletin boards of respective Dean’s offices.

2. The number of students per group in each class is defined in the respective Act of the University Senate on teaching load.

§ 16

1. The Dean oversees the whole educational process at the faculty unit.

2. Mode and requirements for attending classes, including obtaining credits and taking examinations, are determined in a program guide prepared according to the format prevailing in respective Faculty.

3. The programs guides determine specifically:

1) information on the unit/ units implementing the module/ course as well as the unit in charge of the teaching process,

2) contact information for course coordinators,

3) contact details for the person authorized to give credits for the course in the E-INDEX module within the VISUS system, as well as the dates of office hours,

4) detailed course schedule,

5) course regulations, including rules and mode of assessment of student educational performance and completing the course,

6) course/ module syllabus.

4. The guide for the upcoming academic year is delivered by the head of teaching unit to the respective Dean no later than the end of classes in respective academic year.

5. The Program Guide as defined in Item 2 is approved by the Dean and announced to students on the University website before the beginning of academic year after consultation with the University Student Representative Council bodies.

6. No changes can be introduced to the Program Guide defined in Item 2 while the classes from respective course are held, and for courses that are delivered over a longer period of time and are part of a larger course until all the classes from the course are finished.

7. All classes are subject to mandatory, anonymous evaluation by students in the form of a computer-based questionnaire in accordance with the Questionnaire Procedures adopted by the Medical University.

8. In cases of disagreement between the Dean and the Student Government over regulations concerning credits, students have the right to appeal the Dean’s decision to the University President as stated in § 4.

§ 17

1. The course of study is recorded in:

1) transcripts of academic records printed out from the University IT system,

2) end-term test and examination protocols printed out from the University IT system,

3) the University IT system.

2. Documents confirming the course of studies, copies or extracts are issued to a student, a graduate or an authorized person at the student’s or graduate’s request by hand or sent by mail to the indicated address with a return receipt. The authenticity of the signature on the authorization is confirmed by a Dean’s office officer or a notary.

§ 18

1. The University may appoint tutors and Teaching Councils for the specific class years.

2. The tutors are appointed by the Dean in agreement with the Student Government. The tutor of the particular class year should be an academic teacher. Tutors, in agreement with the Student Electoral Commission, initiate the elections of the year representatives.

3. Teaching Councils are appointed by the Dean in order to coordinate the teaching process.

4. A Teaching Council consists of:

1) Vice-Dean,

2) the tutor for the particular class year as a chairperson,

3) academic teachers responsible for completing the teaching program,

4) tutor for each training practice,

5) representatives of the Student Government and the Council dedicated for particular year of study,

6) representatives the Faculty Committee for the Quality Improvement and Assurance in Education.

5. Teaching Councils for the specific class years shall be held at least once a semester. The tutor for the particular class year shall submit an annual report summarizing the Council’s activities in the past academic year.

 

§ 19

1. Training is an integral part of the study program and is carried out according to the study plan and curriculum for each program.

2. Practical training at the University is organized by the Faculty.

3. The Faulty is obligated to draw up regulations for the practical summer/professional training and provide for the documentation of the training in the form of a training program, training booklet of practical skills booklet.

4. With the consent of the tutor or head of the training, it is possible to perform the training outside the didactic units designated by the University.

5. The manner and mode of undergoing and receiving credits for student vacation training practices are determined by the University President in separate regulations.

§ 20

 

1. A student may obtain consent for pursuing his/ her studies according to an individual organization of studies. The consent is given by respective Dean under conditions defined in Item 3 and 7.

2. An individual organization of studies is carried out as:

1) an individual plan of study,

2) an individual mode of study,

3) an individual program of study.

3. The Dean may approve:

1) an individual study plan for students who are highly accomplished and whose grade point average is at least 4.5, and successful completion of the qualifying process, which is governed by separate Faculty regulations established by respective Faculty Boards.

2) an individual mode of study for students who are members of a national sports team, are the sole guardians of children, are disabled, or in other justified situations.

3) an individual program of study for students coming back to the University after taking part in the Erasmus program and pursing their studies as part of the Mostum exchange program.

4. In the situations quoted in Item 3, based on the student’s written, well justified, and documented request, the Dean has the right to agree to the student’s individual plan or mode of study — including credits, examinations and training practices — that is different than the one defined in the student schedule, while also taking into account the capabilities of particular teaching units.

5. A student pursuing his/ her studies according to an individual mode of study may in duly justified cases obtain consent from the Dean to take some courses in an academic year different than the one defined in the student schedule, and thus receiving an individual program of study.

6. An individual plan of study and individual mode of study must include the same classes, exams, and credits as those required of all other students.

7. In case a student does not follow the rules set for the individual plan of study or in case of a lack of academic progress, the Dean may withdraw the permission for the individual plan of study.

8. An individual organization of studies cannot result in extension of the period of studies and increase in the cost of classes.

§ 21

1. Exceptionally talented students can participate in the theoretical classes included in the University study plan, in the programs consistent with their abilities.

2. The right to participate in the theoretical classes, at the request of the director of the school which the student attends, can be granted by the Dean of the relevant faculty, after obtaining the opinion of the head of the unit that provides the above mentioned classes.

3. Should the student be allowed to participate in the classes, the relevant Dean determines the type of classes in which the student is allowed to participate, and the rules for obtaining credit for the classes.

4. A student which is given permission to participate in the classes, is required to comply with the regulations of the unit which provides the classes, the rules of fire and occupational safety and to respect the property of the University.

§ 22

1. The University provides organization and proper implementation of the educational process, taking into account special needs of disabled students, including the adjustment of the conditions of studies to the type of disability.

2. With the consent of the course coordinator, with the exception of clinical classes, assistants of students with disabilities, including sign language interpreters, may participate in the classes.

3. In justified cases, depending on the type and degree of disability, a disables student may use sound or image recording equipment in class, in the manner and form agreed with the person teaching the class.

4. At the request of the relevant Dean approved by the Faculty Council, the Rector may determine the conditions for pursuing the studies in a manner that is different from the one adopted in these General Regulations, adapted to the individual, specific needs of a student who is a disabled person.

§ 22a

As far as pregnant women are concerned, the provisions of § 22 shall apply accordingly.

§ 23

1. There can be conducted individual interdisciplinary studies at the University which include at least two fields of studies and leading to a diploma in at least one field of study.

2. In order to organize individual interdisciplinary studies, there may be appointed an inter-faculty unit at the University. The terms and procedure for the formation, liquidation and transformation of inter-faculty units at the University are determined by the Statutes.

3. The adoption of study plans and curricula for individual interdisciplinary studies is the responsibility of the relevant faculty council or an appointed inter-faculty organizational unit.

4. The procedure and conditions of teaching within individual interdisciplinary studies are the same as for teaching realized within one field of study. It is possible to pursue individual interdisciplinary studies in the form of an individual organization of studies.

§ 24

1. A student who has completed the first year of studies, may apply for a conditional approval of the Dean to begin studies in the following year or semester, once during the whole study period.

The conditional approval enables the student to begin studies in a higher semester/year of studies, while fulfilling the conditions necessary for the completion of studies in the previous semester/year.

2. The conditional approval may be granted to a student who:

1) has failed to complete no more than one course,

2) is required to complete courses due to program differences.

3. The conditional approval cannot be granted if:

1) the course that the students has failed ends with an examination in the given year,

2) the course has been already failed by the student once.

Subject to the provisions of sec. 3, the consent as provided for in sec. 1 cannot be given to a student who has not obtained a credit for more than one course, or the missing credit is for a course that the students has previously failed.

3.The restriction as provided for in sec. 2 concerning the number of courses that the student failed does not apply to students returning from the ERASMUS program and students who failed a course due to an important reason beyond their control.

4. If a student does not fulfill the requirements of the conditional approval within the period determined in the Dean’s decision, the Dean decides if the student should repeat the particular semester/year or be removed from the list of students.

§ 25

1. A written agreement made between the University and each student determines the conditions of payment of tuition fees and educational services.

2. Decisions pertaining to student right to attend classes without paying tuition and fees are made by the President at the student’s request after obtaining the opinion of the Dean.

3. The amount of the tuition fee is determined by the University President at least three months prior to the beginning of the academic year the fee applies to.

4. The regulations regarding a partial decrease of the tuition fee or the full exemption from it are included in in the respective Act of the University Senate.

IV. CONDITIONS FOR RECEIVING CREDITS

§ 26

1. The period in which credits for controlled courses are to be obtained is set by the President. Semesters and an academic year are the periods in which credits for controlled courses are to be obtained.

2. Collecting credits for all of the controlled courses and training practices included in the curriculum for a given year is a condition for receiving credit for the completion of that whole academic year. Students pursuing their studies according to an individual program of study as part of an individual plan of study or an individual mode of study are required to collect credits for all of the controlled courses and training practices included in the curriculum.

3. The threshold for receiving credit for completing the course should not be lower than 60% and not higher than 75%.

Credtis

§ 27

1. The results of end-term tests are announced by means of the University IT system

2. Credits received for courses in the subjects that end with an examination confirm that the student has attended classes and received passing grades for his/her work.

3. In the case of courses which end with credits based on grades received for each course component, the student may retake each unsatisfactory course component test only twice at dates appointed by jointly by the teacher and the student. If the student fails to obtain the required number of passing grades by the end of the academic year, he/she has the right to take an integrative test of the whole course material as presented in Item 1 above. The student is allowed to retake this test only once in case he/she fails it at first try.

4. In the case of courses which end solely:

1) with a final test, should a student receive an unsatisfactory grade he/she is allowed to retake the test maximally twice at dates set by the teacher or a person authorized by the head of the teaching unit,

2) with a system of credits to be achieved throughout the whole course, should a student receive an insufficient number of credits by the end of classes in the particular academic year, he/ she is allowed to take an integrative test of the whole course material as presented in Item 1 above. The student is allowed to retake this test only once in case he/she fails it at first try

5. Detailed conditions for receiving credits are provided in the internal regulations of the particular University teaching units, and they must adhere to these General University Regulations.

6. The student who has failed to comply with the requirements for completing a course has the right to appeal to the head of the relevant teaching unit within 7 workdays. The head of the teaching unit may request that a commission verifies the student’s knowledge. This commission shall consist of the following persons: the head of the unit, the teacher who has taught that class, another specialist in the same subject area, at the student’s request, also the tutor for that year or a representative of the Student Government.

The result of a commission examination is final.

7. The final test — in case of courses which end solely with a final test — is conducted only in cases and according to the detailed schedule discussed previously with the representatives of the Student Government of that class year. The mode of assessment — written or oral — and the date of the examination are determined by the teaching unit and published in the program guide.

8. Each student has the right to see each of his/her written test papers or answer sheets within 5 workdays following the announcement of the test results.

9. A student engaged in research work within the research teams working on University projects may obtain credits for the course or its part, provided that the project subject matter corresponds to the course curriculum.

10. A student taking part in a scientific camp may obtain credits for the student training practice or its part, only in as much as it complies with the training program.

11. Course coordinators are obligated to announce the results of end-term tests no later than within 5 workdays, but no later than September 15.

§ 28

1. A student who has not received credits for courses included in a given year of study must obtain credits for those courses in the next academic year after paying a fee.

2. The rule mentioned above does not apply to first-year students of long cycle programs and first-year students of first cycle programs, who are withdrawn from the University when they fail to obtain credits in particular year of study.

3. The student described in Item 1 has the right to either:

1) repeat the courses without having to continue his/her studies of the next year; or

2) repeat the courses and simultaneously continue his/her studies taking some courses of the next year; or

3) conditionally continue his/her studies in the following year on the terms defined in § 24 of these Regulations.

4. In either one of the cases described in Item 3 above, a failure to receive credits for the repeated courses results in the student’s dismissal from the University.

5. In the course of studies, the student is entitled to choose only one form of repeating the courses as described in Item 2.

6. Each student has to pay a fee for repeating a course. This fee is determined by the Dean based on the current President’s directive regarding the hourly rate for controlled classes for respective Faculties.

Examinations

§ 29

1. The period of time for receiving credits is the continuous examination session system comprising of one or more years of studies during which the student may take his/her examinations at any time.

2. The conditions for obtaining credits in a continuous examination session are as follows:

1) to pass all mandatory examinations for that period;

2) to obtain credits for all non-examination courses and training practices required for that period.

3. A student is not allowed to continue studies in the next year if he/she has failed to collect credits for the continuous examination session of more than one year’s duration.

4. The division of the course of studies into continuous examination sessions is determined by the Faculty Board.

5. With reference to selected curricular courses in the particular continuous session the Faculty Board may decide to transfer the requirement of taking a certain examination by the deadline set.

6. With reference to selected curricular courses in the particular continuous session the Faculty Board may decide to transfer the requirement of taking a certain examination to the following continuous session.

§ 30

1. An examination is a test of the student’s knowledge of the content of a given course of study as determined by the curriculum.

2. Receiving a credit for a mandatory course in a given subject area is a prerequisite to taking an examination.

3. The examination date is negotiated by the student, but it also depends on the appropriate student group’s examination scheduling, through:

1) an individual appointment with the examiner provided that the specified conditions for taking an examination on the first attempt are fulfilled,

2) registering for one of the dates proposed by the examiner since there should be at least three examination dates per academic year and they should be set in agreement with the Student Government of a given class year. The time between the proposed examination dates has to be at least 5 workdays.

4. The result of the OSCE exam is expressed in points – the number of points reached against the maximum number of points.

5. The mode and rules of assessment are defined by the examiner and published in the course regulations.

6. The examination date cannot be set during the time when scheduled classes are held.

7. Course coordinators are obligated to announce the results of examinations no later than within 5 workdays and to deliver signed protocols to respective Dean’s office within 10 days from the date of last examination, but no later than September 15.

§ 31

1. Examinations may be conducted:

1) by academic teachers with scientific titles, i.e., professors, or with a Ph.D. degree also called “doctor with habilitation,” doktor habilitowany — dr hab.

2) by adjuncts and lecturers with Ph.D. degrees as an exception and based on an annual approval of the Faculty Board,

3) by language teachers with practical knowledge of the language involved.

2. During a written examination other employees of the teaching unit may be present, if appointed by the head of the unit.

3. For examinations from courses carried out by several examiners an examiner is decided by a draw with participation of representatives of the Council dedicated for particular year of study.

§ 32

1. Examinations are conducted and evaluated separately in each subject area.

2. An examination may consist of two parts: theory and practice.

3. Students sitting an examination or an end-term test are required to present their ID documents when asked.

4. Students who take examinations while sick and who do not present their sick leave medical certificates may not demand that the results of those examinations be annulled.

5. Until midnight (24:00) of the day the examination was completed, a student has the right to raise objections in writing to the questions included in the test.

6. Examination scheduled for a particular academic year are determined and announced to students by the Dean in the preceding academic year.

7. The regulations for examinations administered in computer-based format are defined in the Regulations of Examinations of in the form of a Test (OpenOLAT).

8. During examinations and tests the following is prohibited:

1) using mobile phones, cameras or other electronic devices,

2) possessing and making use of unauthorized items or texts at his or her desk,

3) copying from the script of another student,

4) dishonestly receiving help from another person,

5) dishonestly giving help to another person.

9. Violation of the above mentioned rules is subject to following disciplinary action:

1) if proven that a student failed to comply with the above mentioned rules during an examination (or during other knowledge verification procedure), he/ she is dismissed from the examination and receives the unsatisfactory grade for that attempt,

2) a notification of this incident will be placed in the student’s file. Additionally, the case may be forwarded to the Disciplinary Commission.

§ 33

1. The following grades are given for examinations, retake examinations and graded credits:

1) very good – 5.0

2) better than good – 4.5

3) good – 4.0

4) fairly good – 3.5

5) satisfactory – 3.0

6) unsatisfactory – 2.0

2. When calculating the GPA, the sum of pass and fail grades obtained from examinations is divided by the total number of examinations, while fail grades which were improved to a grade of better than good after the first retake carried out in the same form as the original examination, are not taken into account.

3. Students of the last year, with the consent of the examiner and the Dean, can retake an exam in one course from the last year of studies, if the prospective grade can change the final grade on the graduation diploma. Both grades obtained by the student are taken into consideration when calculating the GPA.

§ 34

1. For every course, the student who fails the examination has the right to two repeat exams, the mode of which is provided to students together with the schedule. The time between the set exam dates and the results announcement has to be at least 7 workdays, unless an earlier date was appointed jointly by the teacher and the student.

2. The dates set for repeat exams are agreed upon by the examiner and the student or the class representative.

3. The rules pertaining to the repeat NBME exams are defined in the School Regulations for the Students in the English Language Programs.

§ 35

1. The justification for failing to attend an examination must be presented no later than 7 workdays after the date of the examination. Unexcused absence leads to the loss of the right to take the examination on the given date.

2. If the reason for absence is found to be justified, the student and the examiner set a new date which is then considered as the original one.

§ 36

1. A student who questions the fairness of an examination has the right to apply to the Dean for an examination by a commission within 7 workdays following the announcement of the examination results. In the application the student should provide a detailed description of the irregularities perceived during the examination.

2. In duly justified cases, a commission examination may be ordered by the Dean on his/her own initiative.

3. The date of the commission examination is set by the Dean no later than fourteen days following the submission to the Dean’s office of the student’s appeal requesting a commission examination.

4. The examination commission appointed by the Dean consists of:

1) the Dean or Vice Dean as a chairperson,

2) an academic teacher authorized to conduct examinations,

3) the examiner who conducted the previous examination, as observer, in an advisory capacity,

4) another academic teacher authorized to conduct examinations who represents the same discipline or one closely related to it,

5) at the student’s request, as observers, either a tutor for the given academic year or a representative of the Student Government.

5. The examiner who conducted the previous examination cannot serve as the head of the commission.

6. At the student’s request the Dean may appoint a person named by the student to be the other specialist examiner – see Item 4 above.

7. The result of the commission examination is final.

§ 37

1. A student who has failed an examination after all of the possible examination dates have passed, is required to obtain another credit for the controlled course identified by the examiner based on the regulations included in § 28, and must pass the examination before the end of the continued examination session.

2. A failure to pass the retake examination again after the expiration of all possible dates results in the student’s dismissal from the University.

§ 38

1. A student who repeats a given year does not have to receive credits and take examinations in the courses that he/she has already passed.

2. A student may repeat a year of study no more than once throughout the course of studies unless the failure has been caused by prolonged illness or other justified causes.

3. Returning of documents to a student removed from the student list is possible only after the student has returned his/her student identification card and degree clearance slip.

Readmission to a Program of Study

§ 39

1. A student who has been dismissed from the University may apply to enroll again according to the general rules of admission.

2. The student who has been dismissed from the University after the completion of at least the first year of study due to one of the following reasons:

1) a student resigns from studies,

2) a student has not submitted a Master’s or Bachelor’s thesis or taken diploma examination at the scheduled time,

3) in case of a lack of academic progress,

4) in case of failure to receive credit for the completion of a semester or the whole year of study by the deadline,

5) in case of failure to pay tuition fee,

6) a student fails to sign an agreement with the University that determines the conditions of payment of tuition fees and educational services,

may apply on a one-off basis to resume his/her studies after fulfilling the conditions defined by the Dean. The decision of resuming the studies is made by the Dean after a review of the student’s application and a consultation with the Dean’s Council.

3. A student shall file an application for resuming his/her studies not later than 4 months before the beginning of the academic year, in which the reinstatement shall take place.

4. In this decision, the Dean determines the following:

1) the year of studies in which the student can enroll,

2) the examinations required in order to resume studies, but from no more than two courses,

3) the list of courses to be completed in the year which the student resumed his/ her studies,

4) potential programmatic differences to be completed, including the content, number of didactic hours, the deadline and the tuition payment terms,

5) requirements for reinstatement, namely passing the examinations indicated in the Dean’s decision and signing an agreement.

5. The provisions defined in § 38 item 1 of the Regulations apply to a student who has resumed his/her studies.

6. A student removed from the student list due to failure to submit a Master’s or Bachelor’s thesis or take diploma examination at a scheduled time may be reinstated:

1) only to submit a Master’s or Bachelor’s thesis and take diploma examination – unless the application for resuming his/her studies is filed not later than one year from the day of being removed from the student list,

2) for the last year of study – unless the application for resuming his/her studies is filed one year from the day of being removed from the student list.

Before rendering his final decision, the Dean shall ask the thesis supervisor for his/her opinion.

7. A student who after completing at least one year of studies decided to discontinue his or her studies or was removed from the list of students, has the right to apply for a resumption of studies no later than 3 years from the 1st day of the semester when the student was removed from the list of students.

8. A person applying for a resumption has the right to take a reactivation exam at an appointed date.

9. A person applying for a resumption who has not taken the reactivation exam at an appointed date is required to present the Dean with a medical certificate or – in justified cases – another written justification, not later than 5 days from the day the circumstances that caused the absence ceased.

10. Should the person as provided for in sec. 9 present a medical certificate or should another written justification presented by the person be deemed sufficient, the Dean appoints another date for the reactivation exam and this date shall be final.

11. An unexcused absence at the first reactivation exam or an unexcused absence at the final reactivation exam implies the loss of the right to apply for a resumption of studies.

V. AWARDS AND HONORS

§ 40

1. Students may receive the following:

1) scholarships from the Minister of Science and Higher Education. A scholarship from the Minister is the most prestigious award given to the most accomplished student. Detailed regulations and procedures related to the granting of this scholarship are outlined in separate regulations. A student may at the same time receive the President’s scholarship and the scholarship from the Minister of Health. Receiving these scholarships shall not prevent the student from receiving financial aid granted by local authorities, employers, as well as the European Union Structural Funds.

2) awards and honors from the President of the University,

3) awards from state, local government and private institutions, scientific societies, and social organizations, according to the regulations pertaining to the granting of those awards.

2. An award from the University President may be given to a student who has particularly high academic achievements, has fulfilled his/her student responsibilities exceptionally well, and has demonstrated an active and impeccable attitude. The President prescribes detailed rules and procedures for the granting of such awards.

3. The President’s awards are paid out of the teaching activities fund.

§ 41

1. A student who has very good academic achievements; accomplishes good results participating in the student scientific associations; is very active in community service; or has outstanding achievements in the fields of culture, science or sports; may receive honors in the forms of:

1) a public oral commendation from the President or Dean,

2) a congratulatory letter from the President or a Dean,

3) a financial award or a gift,

4) priority over other students also qualify for foreign practice, excursions as well as for the sports, scientific, or recreational camps.

2. The information related to awards received is retained in student file.

§ 42

1. Graduates with outstanding academic achievements and results in community service who have been active in the student scientific, art, and sports associations, and who have a cumulative GPA (grade point average) for all examinations not lower than 4.00 may receive the University Medal for Achievements in Science and Community Service.

2. This medal is conferred by the President on his own initiative, as well as at the request of: the Dean, the Student Government, or other student organizations after obtaining the Dean’s and the University Students’ Representative Council (Rada Uczelniana Samorządu Studenckiego – RUSS) opinion.

3. The medal is presented to the student during the graduation ceremony.

4. The University Medal can be granted only once during studies in a respective field of study.

§ 43

Graduates who have distinguished themselves with outstanding achievements in the work of scientific student associations or cultural organizations, or who have had outstanding results in sports competitions, may receive a congratulatory letter from the University President.

VI. LEAVE OF ABSENCE

§ 44

1. A student may be granted the following types of leaves:

1) a long-term leave, hereinafter referred to as a leave of absence

2) a short-term leave

2. The leave is granted by the Dean at the student’s request.

3. A student may receive an approval for a leave of absence in the following cases:

1) a serious and prolonged illness,

2) having been delegated to study abroad and as part of other types of international mobility,

3) maternity or childcare,

4) difficult financial situation,

5) other compelling reasons.

4. The leave is recorded in documents keeping the track of student’s course of study.

5. The leave delays the time of the planned graduation.

6. During the leave, the student retains a valid student identification card and the right to healthcare, unless the healthcare regulations state differently.

7. During the leave, the student may take part in selected classes, obtain credits, and take examinations with the Dean’s prior approval – so-called active leave of absence.

8. When a leave of absence is granted to a part-time student, the tuition fee paid for those classes that the student did not attend is transferred to the next year and is supplemented by a potential increase of the fee. In the case of any changes to the payment amount, the student or the University respectively is required to make the necessary correction to the payment.

9. Upon the return from the leave, the student is required to present a certificate from the Occupational Medicine Outpatient Clinic stating that the student’s condition allows him/her to resume the studies no later than two weeks prior to the start of the classes and in case of a leave of absence granted due to health issues no later than September 15.

10. A special leave is granted for the period of undergoing active military service.

§ 45

1. Leave of absence is not granted for more than twelve months.

2. Leave of absence is not granted for the period of the preceding academic year or semester.

3. A student may be given a leave of absence twice during the entire duration of studies, unless the reason for it is a prolonged or recurring illness, or childcare.

§ 46

A student may receive approval from the Dean for a short-term leave up to 14 days for domestic or foreign trips that are organized only by the University, the Student Government and student organizations.

§ 47

A student who has completed at least the first year of studies may once interrupt his/her studies for no longer than one year, but will have his/her student rights suspended during that time. The student must notify the Dean before leaving and submit a proper written statement together with the credits book and the student identification card.

VII. GRADUATION

§ 48

1. The conditions for receiving the graduation diploma which signifies graduation and which confers the degree of lekarz (physician) or lekarz dentysta (dental physician) are: the completion of all theoretical and practical classes as well as passing of all examinations in the course of studies.

2. The conditions for receiving the graduation diploma of magister farmacji (Master of Pharmacy) are: the completion of all theoretical and practical classes; passing of all examinations in the course of studies; writing the thesis; obtaining a passing grade from the final Master’s examination; and completing a six-month traineeship in a community and hospital pharmacy following the defense of the thesis.

3. The conditions for receiving the graduation diploma that signifies the completion of the first , second, or one cycle studies, and that confers respectively either the degree of licencjat (Bachelor) or magister (Master of Science), are: the completion of all theoretical and practical classes; passing of all examinations in the course of studies; preparing a Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis; and passing a final examination with a positive result. Additionally, a person who has completed a first cycle program retains his/ her student rights until October 31st of the year he/ she graduated.

§ 49

1. The Dean dismisses a student from the University in the following cases:

1) a student has not undertaken his/ her studies, that is has not met formal requirements to start a program, including not signing an official agreement with the University or failing to attend classes with no justified excuse, or being absent without a valid excuse from curricular classes within 14 days from the day of taking student oath, ending leave of absence or resuming studies after their interruption.

2) a student resigns from studies, and the date of the resignation is the day on which the written resignation has been received by the University,

3) a student has not submitted a Master’s or Bachelor’s thesis or taken diploma examination,

4) a student has been awarded a disciplinary penalty of expulsion from the University.

2. The Dean may dismiss a student from the University in the following cases:

1) in case of a lack of academic progress,

2) in case of failure to receive credit for the completion of the whole year of study or by the deadline in the continuous examination session system,

3) in case of failure to pay tuition fee.

3. Circumstances stated in Item 1 and 2 are defined in separate internal University proceedings initiated by the Dean. The student is notified of the proceedings in writing. The notification should include factual and legal justification as well as instructions on the right to offer explanation within 14 days of written notice.

4. A student has the right to appeal the decisions on issues described in Item 1 and 2 to the University President. The President’s decision is final.

Regulations § 50-57 refer to degrees in Pharmacy, Laboratory Medicine, Cosmetology, Physiotherapy, Nursing, Midwifery, Medical Radiation Sciences, Emergency Medical Care, Public Health.

§ 50

1. The Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis is prepared by a student under the supervision of an academic teacher with a scientific degree of at least a Ph.D., doktor, with potential cooperation from a thesis tutor who holds at least a Master’s degree. An academic teacher who has the right to exercise the profession of a nurse and holds at least a Master’s degree can act as a tutor of a Bachelor’s (case study) thesis in the field of Nursing. An academic teacher who has the right to exercise the profession of a midwife and holds at least a Master’s degree can act as a tutor of a Bachelor’s (case study) thesis in the field of Midwifery.

2. After consultation with the Faculty Board, the Dean may authorize a specialist from outside the University with a scientific degree of at least a Ph.D., doktor, to supervise the Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis defense.

3. A Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis may be written in a foreign language after prior approval from the Dean of the appropriate faculty.

However, such thesis must contain a comprehensive abstract in Polish.

§ 51

1. The scientific interests of a student should be taken into account while defining the subject of a Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis. The subject of thesis should be related to a field of study of a student.

2. If a student receives a funded scholarship, has entered into a preliminary job contract, or becomes a full-time employee, the needs of the hiring institution in question should be taken into account within reasonable bounds.

3. The subject of a Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis approved by the Program Council of the appropriate unit should be defined at least three semesters prior to graduation.

4. In justified situations the subject of a Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis may be changed with the approval of the thesis supervisor and the Dean.

§ 52

1. The Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis reviewer evaluates the thesis by applying the general grading system defined in § 33 Item 1, whereas regulations included in § 46 should be followed by thesis reviewers. In case of discrepancy or differences of opinion regarding thesis evaluation, the Dean decides about admitting the student to a final examination. The Dean may also ask another reviewer for his/her opinion.Only a person holding at least a Ph.D. degree can act as Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis reviewer.

2. A respective University body declares the proceedings pertaining to the conferring of the degree invalid if the degree candidate in the thesis, which forms the basis for conferring the degree, assigns to himself/ herself the authorship of substantial part or other elements of someone else’s work or research findings.

§ 53

1. By September 15th at the latest, the student is required to submit the Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis to the Dean’s office in number of copies required by respective faculty — a hard copy and the other an electronic version on a CD.

2. At the request of the thesis supervisor or the student, the Dean may reschedule the date for the Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis submission, in the following circumstances:

1) a serious or a prolonged illness confirmed by an appropriate medical certificate,

2) an inability to complete a Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis within the given deadline for justified reasons that are independent of the student.

The deadline for submitting a Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis may be moved up by no more than 3 months from the deadline set in Item 1 hereby.

3. In case of a prolonged absence of the Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis supervisor, which could cause a delay in submitting the Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis by the student, the Dean has to appoint a person who will take over the supervisory responsibilities. Switching of the thesis supervisors within the period of 6 months before the graduation date may present a basis for extending the deadline of thesis submission as stated in Item 2.

4. A student who did not submit a Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis by the dates set in Items 1 or 2 is dismissed from the University.

§ 54

1. The conditions for admitting a student to the Bachelor’s or Master’s final examination are as follows:

1) obtaining credits for all classes and training practices in the entire course of studies and delivering to the Dean’s office the examination cards for the third-year student of first cycle (Bachelor’s degree) program, second-year student of second cycle (Master’s degree) program and fifth-year student of long cycle Master’s degree program.

2) obtaining at least a satisfactory grade for the Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis.

2. A Bachelor’s degree examination for Nursing and Midwifery students is comprised of practical and theoretical part as well as a Bachelor’s thesis defense. A practical and theoretical part of the examinations are described in separate regulations.

3. A Bachelor’s or Master’s degree examination is held in the presence of the examination commission, appointed by the Dean and consisting of: the Dean or Vice Dean, or in justified situations, the head of the unit, as the commission chairperson; thesis supervisor; thesis tutor; and thesis reviewer. A practical and theoretical part of the examination in the field of Nursing and Midwifery is held in the presence of the examination commission appointed according to the regulations in Item 2 above. When an academic teacher who holds a Ph.D. degree acts as a tutor of a Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis, an additional member may be added to the examination commission, namely an academic teacher with scientific title “doctor with habilitation,” doktor habilitowany — dr hab. from the unit where the thesis has been carried out.

4. The Bachelor’s or Master’s degree examination should be held within 3 months from submission of the Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis, but no later than September 30.

5. In the case of extending the submission date for a Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis, the examination should be held within 1 month from the date of thesis submission.

6. The Bachelor’s or Master’s examination may be held in a foreign language after prior approval received from the Dean of the relevant faculty.

§ 55

1. At the student’s or thesis tutor’s request a final (diploma) examination may be open to public.

2. The mode of conducting the examination as described in Item 1 is as follows:

1) A student files an application for conducting an open to public diploma examination to the head of respective organizational unit at the latest on the day of submitting the thesis,

2) The head of respective organizational unit notifies the thesis supervisor, the student and the Dean’s office of respective Faculty respectively about the open diploma examination,

3) The Dean’s office of respective Faculty posts information about the open diploma examination on the University website at the latest two weeks before the examination date providing the commission composition, the date and place of the examination, name of the student sitting the examination and the subject of the thesis.

4) A public diploma examination consists of open and closed proceedings.

The open proceedings include:

a) starting the examination by the head of Examination Committee,

b) introducing the members of the Examination Committee,

c) introducing the degree candidate,

d) providing the committee with the subject of the thesis,

e) announcing the grade for the thesis,

f) providing the candidate with an oral justification of the grade,

g) announcing the result of the examination by the head of Examination Committee.

5) During the open proceedings of the diploma examination the student:

a) presents his/ her thesis,

b) takes part in the discussion pertaining to the thesis,

c) answers questions posed by the members of the Examination Committee.

6) Persons taking part in a public diploma examination who are not members of the Examination Committee are not allowed to pose examination questions to the degree candidate and participate in the Committee deliberations during the closed proceedings, but they are allowed to take part in the discussion pertaining to the subject of the thesis.

7) During closed proceedings the Committee determines the following:

a) the final result for the thesis calculated according to the School Regulations,

b) the grade for the diploma examination (based on the answers provided by the degree candidate relating to the thesis and problematic questions).

§ 56

1. A Bachelor’s or Master’s final examination is an oral examination.

2. The general grading system defined in § 33 Item 1 is applied in the assessment of the examination results.

§ 57

1. In case of receiving an unsatisfactory grade in a Bachelor’s or Master’s examination, or of failing to attend an examination on the appointed date without a justified cause, the Dean sets the second date for the examination as the final one. The second examination cannot be held earlier than one month and not later than three months since the original examination date unless an earlier date was appointed jointly by mutual agreement of the parties.

2. In the case of failing a Bachelor’s or Master’s examination on the second attempt the Dean makes his/her decision whether:

1) the student may repeat the final year of studies, or

2) the student is dismissed from the University,

3. The person as described in Item 1 above loses his/her student rights.

§ 58

1. Each PUMS graduate receives a diploma confirming that he/ she obtained a respective degree as well as a diploma supplements according to the format approved by the University Senate. The issuing of the diploma is possible only after fulfillment of the following conditions:

1) returning the student identification card, excluding first cycle program,

2) returning the examination cards,

3) returning the degree clearance slip,

4) making all of the required payments.

2. The basis for calculating the cumulative score is the average of all examination grades obtained throughout the entire study duration that constitutes 70% of the final score. And, as applicable only to Pharmacy and Physiotherapy Program graduates, the grade for the Bachelor’s thesis, Master’s thesis, and a Bachelor’s or Master’s final examination, where each constitutes 15 % of the final grade.

3. In the calculation of the cumulative score provisions defined in § 33 shall apply.

4. The final grades for all examinations and credit courses taken under the pass/fail option but ending with a grade are written into a diploma supplement in according to the resolution of the Faculty Board. The overall cumulative grade in the diploma supplement is calculated according to Items 2 and 3 above.

5. The diploma and the diploma supplement include the final grade determined through the rounding off of the arithmetical average (see Item 3) up to whole number according to the following rule:
satisfactory – up to 3,20
fairly good — 3,21 – 3,70
good — 3,71 – 4,20
better than good — 4,21 – 4,50
very good — 4,51 – 5,00.

6. The rounding off of the arithmetical average up to a whole number applies only to the final grade written in the diploma and the diploma supplement; whereas, in all other certificates and transcripts the actual full final grade is given, calculated as per Item 2 above and according to generally acknowledged mathematical rules.

 

 

Dormitory Regulations for students in the English Language Programs at the Poznan University of Medical Sciences (PUMS)

Student Dormitory residents are required to obey the commonly abiding law and internal regulations of the University, including the Statute, School Regulations and Dormitory Regulations for Students in the English Language Programs at the Poznan University of Medical Sciences (PUMS). Ignorance of the law does not excuse anyone from breaking any regulations.

Every Resident of the Student Dormitory is required to respect the rights of other Residents of the Student Dormitory.

Definitions

Resident is a student enrolled in the university who is legally entitled to live in the dormitory because he/she has signed a contract with the University and is required to pay fees for a place in the Student Dormitory. Residents are obligated to attend floor meetings relating to dormitory issues that are held by R.A.s (absent residents must have a meeting with an R.A. to go over all topics covered).

Residential Advisor (R.A.) is a registered member of the student population at the University who is also a resident in one of the University dormitories. Residential Advisors (R.A.s) are also University representatives. The R.A.s are expected to abide by the all rules and regulations pertaining to their status as a dormitory resident. In addition, they must also follow all rules and regulations set forth by the R.A. system. The R.A. Regulations and R.A. Director Regulations are defined by the Dean of Center for Medical Education in English. The R.A.s and the R.A. Director can be offered a dormitory fee discount, but only up to 50% of the fee.

Resident Council, Rada Mieszkańców, is the representative body of the dormitory residents, and also as an organ of the University Representative Council a co-host of dormitory. The dormitory residents are required to cooperate with the Resident Council, follow and respect its regulations, and abide by its decisions. All residents have both the passive and active right to elect the Resident Council. The members of the Resident Council are obligated to intervene in all cases where the regulations are being infringed upon.

Dormitory environment and observance of the quiet hours

1) The dormitory is an integral part of the University. It is a place where residing students—officially installed in the dormitory system—may live, study and rest. The dormitory is the property of the University and therefore residents have the right to use it only in accordance with the rules established by the University.

Sleeping and studying are considered to be the highest priority among all dormitory activities. All other activities that conflict with sleeping and studying, e.g., having parties or social gatherings, or other boisterous activities, shall be regarded as low priority. In such cases residents are advised to take appropriate actions as defined in item 56 b).

2) Dormitory quiet hours are in effect from 10:00 pm to 6:00 am Sunday through Thursday and from 12:00 am to 6:00 am on Fridays and Saturdays.

Vacuuming, playing loud music, loud talking in hallways, and other types of disturbances are forbidden during these hours. Doing laundry during quiet hours is permitted provided that residents respect their fellow residents and conduct themselves quietly. All persons present in the dormitory are required to abide by the quiet hours regulations.

3) Dormitory residents may make special requests to R.A.s, such as the need for introducing prolonged curfews (lights-out) in the dormitory on the eve of an important exam. Only applications sent to an email address resadv@pums.edu.pl at least 7 days prior to the date of the examination will be taken into account. The consent to introduce prolonged curfews is given by the R.A. Director in agreement with the administration of respective dormitory. Out of respect for fellow students, dormitory residents, after introducing quiet hours upon such requests, are expected to comply by maintaining an environment that promotes studying and sleeping. Non-compliance will be considered as an infraction to dormitory the quiet hours regulations and will be dealt with accordingly.

4) All residents are responsible for helping to maintain a clean dormitory environment. Common areas, which include but are not limited to the: kitchen, lounge, laundry room, and hallway areas, must be kept free and clear of personal items such as shoes, garbage, boxes, clothing racks etc. Under the contract that each dormitory resident has signed with the University, he/she is entitled to rent only the inside of his/her room. Therefore, common areas are not to be used for storage of personal items. Personal items must be kept inside the residents’ rooms, or may be stored free of charge in one of the designated storage rooms (The Storage Room Rules are available at the Dormitory Administration offices). The space outside each resident’s room door, including the hallway, is considered to be a common area and must be kept free and clear of all items at all times. Each resident is responsible for keeping the area in front of the room door free of items at all times. In case there is no storage room in a respective dormitory, students may store their personal belongings free of charge in the PUMS Central Storage located on the PUMS campus (The Storage Room Rules are available in the Central Storage Room office). The University is not responsible for the possessions left in the Storage Room.

5) All residents are responsible for maintaining the cleanliness of their rooms and for reporting any damages to the dormitory administration. Vacuum cleaners, as well as a mop and a bucket, are available from the porter for cleaning purposes.

6) Common areas, such as the kitchen and the lounge, must be kept free and clear of dirty dishes, food, and other types of items. Tables, counters, and floors—if appropriate—must be cleaned after use so that they are left in acceptable condition for fellow residents. Kitchen garbage must be properly disposed of in the garbage receptacles located in all kitchen areas.

7) Garbage from residents’ rooms may not be disposed of in common area garbage receptacles but instead must be taken to the appropriate dormitory garbage disposal area. For example, in the Eskulap dormitory, garbage chutes are provided on every floor for garbage disposal. Garbage must be placed in these chutes. It is not acceptable to leave garbage on the floor by the garbage chute for the cleaning staff to deal with. In all other dormitories—Karolek, Aspirynka, and Medyk—outdoor garbage bins are provided for use and garbage from residents’ rooms must be placed there.

8) Recycling bins are available in all dormitories for the recycling of glass, paper, plastic, and metal items. The use of the recycling bins is compulsory. Large and/or bulky items should be crushed to allow consolidation.

9) Residents may not remove from the common areas for their personal use any items such as chairs and tables, televisions, or anything else intended for community use in the common areas. Personal items left by the residents in the common areas shall be removed by the dormitory administration employees and deposited in the PUMS Storage Rooms in accordance with the provisions defined in the Storage Room Regulations for Residents of Dormitories at Poznan University of Medical Sciences

Entrance and access to the dormitory

10) The dormitory photo I.D. card is the proof that a resident has the right to stay in the dormitory. Residents are required to present their cards to the porter, dormitory administration, and the members of the Resident Council whenever asked to do so. The dormitory I.D. card is issued for one academic year only and hence residents are required to receive a new card from their respective dormitory administration office at the beginning of the new academic year. The porter may refuse entrance to the residents who fail to present their cards

11) No person may enter or leave dormitory buildings via balconies or windows except for an emergency.

12) Dormitory access keys provided by the administration are the full responsibility of the resident, except for situations when the keys are left in the porter’s room. Lost keys will be replaced at the expense of the resident with any additional charges to be covered by the resident, including but not limited to changing the lock to the resident’s room. Residents of all dormitories must leave their keys with the porter each time they leave the dormitory.

Dormitory visitors and guests

13) Residents are not permitted to have visitors in dormitory rooms after midnight.on weekdays. On Friday and Saturday this deadline is extended until 1AM.

In each dormitory, porters have the authority to refuse entry to all persons who are not residents of that dormitory.

Visitors: a dormitory resident is permitted to have visitors provided that the visitors(s) leave their identification documents with a photo (other than a national ID card, a military service book, a passport) in the porter’s office or other designated area, as well as observe these regulations both inside the dormitory or on dormitory property. Visitors must leave the dormitory upon commencement of quiet hours (after midnight on weekdays, and after 1AM on Fridays and Saturdays) or upon request by an R.A., the porter, or by security personnel. In case visitors do not leave by the time quiet hours start, the hosting residents are required to issue a pass for them and pay for their overnight stay to their subaccount. In case visitor(s) do not possess document(s) listed above, they are required to present their identification documents (a national ID card, a military service book, a passport) in the porter’s office or other designated area to Dormitory Administration employee(s) whose duty it is to record the data (first and last name of the guest, the identity card series and type, date and exact hour of entering and leaving the dormitory, first and last name of the hosting resident and his/ her room number) included in these documents. The purpose of keeping the log book is to ensure safety in the dormitory. The data recorded are not processed.

Visitors must leave the dormitory upon commencement of quiet hours or upon request by an R.A., the porter, or by security personnel.

Overnight guest stay: a dormitory resident can make an arrangement with the dormitory administration to have a guest stay overnight provided that the roommate(s) of the host, if applicable, agree to such overnight stays and the hosting resident purchases a pass for his/ her guest. A pass for the guest is valid for the maximum duration of 48 hours unless the Dormitory Administration agrees for a longer stay. A hosting resident can make an arrangement for the overnight stay of one guest at a time. In exceptional cases the head of PUMS Dormitory Administration may agree for a longer stay of a guest at the rate of a pass. A resident may purchase up to four passes for his/ her guests per month. In case a resident purchases more than four passes, he/ she will be charged a regular fee for non-PUMS students/ employees for the each extra pass. Dormitory resident must make this arrangement with dormitory administration prior to the guest’s visit. During the guest’s stay, the hosting resident is fully responsible for the conduct of that guest.

Unauthorized persons: visitors to the dormitory who have not registered with the porter are in violation of dormitory regulations and can be asked to leave the dormitory property by the R.A.s, porters, and security personnel.

If a visitor or a guest causes a disturbance or otherwise breaks the rules on dormitory premises, he/she will be asked to leave, or, if uncooperative, he/she will be removed from the dormitory. Please note that the R.A.s, porters, and the security staff all have the full authority to act in such circumstances.

14) The hosting resident is entirely responsible for his/her visitor’s or guest’s behavior. Visitors or guests visibly under the influence of alcohol, or who otherwise pose a threat to others’ safety and/or security, have no right of entry to the dormitory and will be asked to leave the dormitory area.

Use of dormitory facilities

15) Dormitory residents, as well as student organizations, have the right to use any rooms designated for common use. Priority is given first to dormitory residents and then to student organizations. Without the approval of the head of the PUMS Dormitory Administration, the rooms cannot be used for any purpose other than the purpose designated by the University. A log book where students can register for the use of the common areas in dormitories, such as study rooms, is available in the porter’s office.

16) The use of dormitory facilities is strictly for residents of that dormitory and their registered guests only.

17) The laundry facilities in a particular dormitory are intended for the use of the residents of that dormitory only. Unregistered guests or residents of other dormitories are forbidden from using such equipment.

18) Dormitory administration is not responsible for any personal belongings left in public spaces.

Parties

19) It is not allowed to organize parties in PUMS dormitories. According to par. VII of the School Regulations for English Programs’ Students alcohol is banned at all times and under all circumstances in the University dormitory.

20) Occasional meetings/ gatherings may be organized with the agreement of roommates and neighbors.

21) Cleaning tools such as a mop and a bucket or a vacuum cleaner may be borrowed from the porter for use in the post-party clean-up.

Safety and security

22) Dormitory residents and their guests are obligated to follow all fire, health, and safety regulations in the interest of both their own safety and the safety of other residents living in the dormitories. They are also obligated to use the fire and safety equipment, or electrical and other devices according to their intended purposes. It is strictly forbidden to use any appliances in an inappropriate way, i.e., that causes danger to the user, other residents, or to University property, or that in any way compromises general safety and/or security, including tampering with fire detectors. Blocking the fire department access roads outside the dorm—as well as the fire exits, stairwells, evacuation passages, and corridors inside the dorm—and smoking is also considered to be the breaking of fire safety rules. Residents are charged with the costs of fire service attendance in case of setting on the fire detectors due to smoking in dormitory room, lighting candles etc.

23) Dormitory residents are obligated to immediately inform the R.A.s and the administration about any accident or serious illness involving their roommates.

24) Residents may not throw any items off the dormitory balconies or out of the dormitory windows.

25) Residents may not possess or store dangerous or flammable substances on University property. Such substances will be removed by University personnel.

26) Smoking is forbidden in all dormitory buildings.

27) The following activities are forbidden in PUMS dormitories:

a) using gas and electric cookers, as well as washing machines at places other than designated;

b) using electric kettles without a thermal safety cut-out mechanism;

c) using hotplates and any devices used for cooking in residents’ rooms;

d) using refrigerators with power capacity exceeding 200 W;

e) using any kinds of heaters and air conditioners;

f) unauthorized installing, repairing, or altering of the electrical, water, and gas connections and equipment;

g) changing of locks or installing new ones, as well as making duplicate keys;

h) installing and using other appliances, and devices that pose a threat to human health or life;

i) using, possessing, selling, or distributing of intoxicants and illegal drugs,

j) gambling;

k) possessing any type of guns, especially firearms or pneumatic guns on dormitory property (including sports and collectors firearms);

l) running a business without the consent of the Resident Council, the head of the PUMS Dormitory Administration, and of the Chancellor;

m) storing in dormitory rooms and in common areas of any widely available commodities and goods whose purpose and quantity is suggestive of commercial purposes.

Residents faced with situations that may be health and life-threatening or otherwise pose a threat to dormitory safety and/or security should immediately notify University authorities onsite—R.A.s, porter, security staff—and/or the appropriate emergency services (the police, fire brigade, medical emergency service), if appropriate.

28) Keeping any pets—live animals of any kind—in a dormitory is strictly forbidden. Any student who keeps animals at the dormitory will be required to remove them immediately.

Upon finding evidence of any violations the University will take appropriate disciplinary action including suspension or expulsion.

Dormitory accommodations

29) Eligible students are admitted to the dormitory through the online registration system depending on room availability. Each student interested in obtaining dormitory privileges must complete an online application. Upon acceptance, all necessary formal matters are handled by the dormitory administration staff in conjunction with the Dean’s office located on ul. Jackowskiego 41 in accordance with the following rules:

a) dormitory reservations for incoming students are based on online applications that should be submitted in the University admissions system. The University guarantees accommodation in its dormitories to newly accepted students for one academic year only; students of higher years will be accommodated in case of vacancies, following the order in which the applications for accommodation were received;

b) dormitory assignments for incoming students are made according to the following criteria in the given order: 1) numbers of points achieved in the admissions process, 2) date of payment (the date the University bank account was credited with the payment is decisive) of the fees indicated in the acceptance letter;

c) dormitory reservations for following years are administered by the online system by April 30th of every academic year. For newly accepted students the deadline is appointed for July 31st of a given year. If a student fails to notify dormitory administration of their interest in room reservation for the next academic year by this deadline, the University will be unable to guarantee the room for the upcoming academic year and such a person must move out of dormitories by the end of July od a given year;

d) any changes pertaining to dormitory accommodation of the English Language Programs’ Students, except for the situations described in Item a) and b) as well as situations relating to renovations in dormitories (moving to another dormitory, switching dormitory rooms), are introduced by means of an on-line waiting list available on the University website for English-based Programs;

e) rules relating to dormitory accommodation of students with the status of leave of absence/ deferred students/ students who interrupted their studies are as follows:

–  residents whose student status has been changed to leave of absence/ are deferred students/ who have interrupted their studies/ whose student status has been changed to half-time status etc. are required to notify the dormitory administration in writing about their student status change as well as about their plans to leave in the room just their personal belongings while they are away;

– for students leaving Poland the fee for keeping their belongings in the dormitory rooms amounts to half the price of dormitory fee, both in case of leaving their personal items in the dormitory or the University Storage Room in accordance with the provisions defined in the Storage Room Regulations for Residents of Dormitories at Poznan University of Medical Sciences;

– the situation as described above cannot last longer than 6 months,

– upon coming back the student is required to register for the waiting list and is placed in a dormitory according to availability of rooms.

f) students moving into dormitories are required to pay three monthly payments even if they do not physically stay in the dormitory for that period of time. The first sentence does not concern students who resign from staying in the assigned room in the dormitory within 14 days from moving into the dormitory the latest. In such a case the dormitory fee is calculated daily based on actual number of days spend in the room by a student which means from the day of receiving the key to the room until the day of resignation and returning the key. The above mentioned rule does not apply to newly accepted students who reserved a dormitory room just for one month while registering on-line for dormitory accommodation at PUMS.

30) At the beginning of each student’s dormitory residency, he/she receives bedding and other items, such as a reading lamp, with the understanding that such equipment will be returned in satisfactory condition at the end of the dormitory residency. The resident is obligated to check the condition of the equipment upon receipt to ensure that it is in satisfactory condition and report missing items to respective dormitory administration office so that they can be replenished, but no later than within 48 hours from moving into dormitory. Any damaged or missing equipment or room damages should be immediately reported to the dormitory administration. If the damages are caused by the resident, he/she will become fully responsible for the damage through a deduction out of the security deposit. If such damages exceed the security deposit, then the responsible resident will have the charges billed directly to the student account and will be notified of these charges by the dormitory administration.

31) A single resident may occupy a double room only if he/she pays for two spots in that dormitory, and this arrangement is contingent on the availability of such rooms in the requested dormitory and provided that a resident receives an assignment to this type of room based on his/her waiting list registration.

32) In the case of dormitory rooms shared by two persons, the practice whereby one of the residents moves out and leaves his/her name as registered with the dormitory administration, so that the room in question appears to be occupied by two persons, is strictly forbidden.

33) When one roommate has not appeared in the dormitory or moves out of a double room, the second roommate:

a) for the following month has the right to stay in the room and pay the same dormitory fees as up until now,

b) upon receiving a consent from dormitory administration may stay in the room and pay for two spots,

c) is required to move to another shared dormitory room indicated by dormitory administration within no longer than two weeks from the time of receiving a notice from the administration or accept a roommate designated by dormitory administration to be placed in the room. In case a resident does not agree on the solution defined in item c), he/ she loses the right to be accommodated in the room two weeks after the resident was notified by dormitory administration of the necessity to be placed in a double room / accept a roommate.

d) still retains the right to stay in the room and pay the same dormitory fees as up until now unless dormitory administration presents him/ her an option to place a roommate in the room or to be moved to another shared room.

34) Dormitory residents are obligated to pay for all additional financial commitments, e.g., phone bills resulting from the use of the telephone exchange, as well as for heating and water bills. The process and the terms of payment are established by the dormitory administration. Failure to comply will result in deducting the outstanding charges from the resident’s dormitory deposit and in a possible expulsion from the dormitory.

35) Dormitory fees are announced at the University website. The monthly dormitory fees for newly accepted students are determined in the Attachment no. 1 to the student agreement with the University.

36) If a newly accepted student reserves a dormitory room (the choice of the dormitory is made by the University who has updated information regarding vacancies in particular dormitories), the student is required to pay a refundable deposit in the amount of 1500 PLN (one thousand five hundred PLN) to the University account. The amount is not the dormitory fee, but it is a safety deposit in case of potential damage done by the student or the dormitory fee arrears. The deposit is being settled after the student leaves the dormitory.

37) The deposit is payable in PLN by the deadline given in the letter of acceptance (applies to newly accepted students). Dormitory fee is paid to the designated bank account (individual sub-account) in PLN monthly and in advance by the 15th day of each month. Students moving into dormitories during an academic year are required to pay dormitory fees and security deposits by the 14th day of the month in which they started residing in dormitories.

38) The Erasmus students assigned to PUMS dormitories are required to put down the security deposit in the amount of one monthly rent in respective dormitory.

39) The student is required to inform the dormitory administration in writing if the student leaves the room for the summer period (June, July, August and September), and give the date of leaving and returning before leaving for holidays but by the end of June of a given academic year at the latest, under pain of being charged full dormitory fee for the summer period, should the student fail to do so. If the student stays in the room for the summer period, the student is required to pay regular dormitory fee for every summer month, and if the student only leaves his/her belongings in the room, but does not reside in it, the fee is equal to half of the dormitory fee.

40) For PUMS M.D. and Pharm.D. students in their last year of study undergoing part of their coursework (e.g. elective rotations or six-month traineeship in a pharmacy) abroad the fee for keeping their belongings in the dormitory rooms amounts to half the price of dormitory fee. The students will be charged the standard dormitory fee for the time they were keeping their belongings in the dormitory rooms while away unless they provide dormitory administration with the official documents issued by the accepting institution and confirming the exact dates of the coursework completed abroad before going on electives/ traineeship.

41) For students with the status of leave of absence/ deferred students/ students who interrupted their studies/ half-time status etc. who are leaving Poland for up to 6 months, the fee for keeping their belongings in the dormitory rooms amounts to half the price of dormitory fee (as in item 29 e).

42) The student who moves out of the dormitory during the academic year, and who had already paid the full dormitory fee, is entitled to a refund. The dormitory fee refunds are issued only for the full months and only to students who do not have any unpaid fees. The refunds are given after the move-out from the dormitory is completed.

43) A dormitory resident is not allowed to change rooms without the permission of dormitory administration.

44) Dormitory fees for persons moving into or moving out of dormitories during a certain month will be calculated daily for the specific length of dormitory occupancy.

45) Dormitory administration may assign rooms during the summer break before the start of the academic year. This rule does not apply to students who are not eligible to reserve rooms during summer holidays as they are assigned to dormitory rooms exclusively through the online dormitory registration system.

46) Any belongings or personal items left in a room by a departing resident after the deadline for the resident’s move-out will be used for the benefit of the dormitory, provided that the departing resident had been notified and that 90 days have passed.

47) Under no circumstance is a resident to alter or repair anything that will change the aesthetics of his/her room. Any damages should be reported and the dormitory administration is responsible for fixing any damages in resident rooms. Residents will be held financially responsible for any damages and missing items or equipment in dormitory rooms. In case the identity of the person responsible for the damage(s) is not established, both room residents will be held financially responsible. The charges which include the worth of the missing equipment, or its repair, will be assessed and collected by the head of the PUMS Dormitory Administration in cooperation with the Resident Council.

48) Any currently enrolled students are eligible to sign up for the on-line waiting list, but dormitory assignments from waiting list can be made only after the University has provided dormitory accommodation to all its newly accepted students who registered for dormitory by the end of July of that particular year. The names of students who signed up for the waiting list are not invalidated with the end of an academic year. Dormitory assignments based on waiting list registrations are available between October 15 at the latest and April 15 of a given year according to availability of rooms in a particular dormitory.

49) As part of dormitory waiting list registrations for a single room the University introduces rules with a high priority on seniority:

a) all students in their last and second-to-last years of study (“senior students”) who apply for a single room get assigned on a strictly first-come, first-served basis,

b) all non-first-year persons that apply for a single room and who do not fit into the “senior students” group as described in Item above will be granted a room, but only after all current “senior students” defined in Item a) have had their requests granted,

c) no first year student will be assigned a single room unless the first two criteria described in Item a) and b) have been satisfied,

d) students in their last year of study undergoing part of their coursework (e.g. elective rotations) abroad who apply for dormitory accommodation will have priority over other students, but only after the University satisfies requests of all current first-year students.

Moving out of the dormitory

50) The resident who intends to vacate his/her dormitory room must provide the dormitory administration with a 14-day advance written notice. In cases where the resident fails to provide sufficient notice, then he/she pays the rent amount until the last day of the 14-day notice. The rule defined in this item also applies to the students in their last year of study. The additional confirmation from dormitory administration on the degree clearance slip required for the issuing of the diploma is available only after making all of the required payments by June 30th of a given year or by the estimated day of departure from the dormitory, not later than by July 31st of a given year.

51) When a resident moves out voluntarily or is evicted, he/she is obligated to return all of the bedding and equipment he/she had received during dormitory residency. The departing resident is also obligated to pay up any outstanding accounts and to leave the room in the same condition he/she had found it at the time of moving in. All room furniture must be returned to its original position.

The loss of the right to stay in a dormitory

52) The right to stay in a dormitory will be taken away under the following conditions:

a) a resident has not appeared in the dormitory without providing sufficient reasons within 7 days of the start of the classes for his/ her program in a given academic year;

b) a resident has lived in the dormitory for more than two months but has failed to pay for it despite having received at least two written notifications from the dormitory administration;

c) the administration withdraws permission for the resident to occupy a place in the dormitory;

d) gross infringement of dormitory rules and regulations;

e) a resident graduates from the University;

f) a resident is removed from the student list;

g) a resident is suspended in student rights.

The loss of dormitory privileges under Items (a) and (b) as well Items (e) – (g) as is automatic. Responsibility for enforcing this rule belongs to the head of the PUMS Dormitory Administration. Decisions pertaining to the loss of dormitory privileges described in Items (c) and (d) above, and to a possible extension of the period of time mentioned in Item (b) rest within the authority of the Vice President of Student Affairs.

53) The resident who loses the right to stay in a dormitory must return all equipment and vacate the assigned room, leaving it in a satisfactory condition, within 7 days of having been notified, or eviction by the administration will take place. In the following cases students cannot apply for a spot in a dormitory: failure to pay all the fees and additional costs of staying in dormitory; buying, selling or acting as a go-between in dormitory room trading; gross infringement of dormitory rules and regulations; or assignment to a dormitory on the basis of false personal data.

Disciplinary action

54) The three-strike rule

With respect to the enforcement of dormitory rules and regulations, the following policy has been implemented.

1. Those residents who have committed a minor infraction of dormitory rules will initially be given a first offense warning, which will be registered but no further disciplinary action will be taken for the first incident,

2. For the second minor infraction of the rules the R.A. Director and/ or dormitory administration employee will issue a report to the Dean’s office for the in English language programs, based on the explanations offered by the offender, accounts of at least two witnesses, including an R.A. Then, the resident will receive an official notice of infringement of the PUMS dormitory rules which will be retained in the student’s file forever.

3. Further failures to comply with University rules and regulations obligates the Dean’s office to apply to the Vice-President for Student Affairs to file a reprimand and remove the student from dormitory.

4. The examples of minor infractions include: leaving items in the hallway outside room door (shoes, garbage, etc.); repeated noise-making or engaging in other activities which disturb others; failing to cooperate with the dormitory administration, R.A.s, porters, or security personnel; leaving common areas, such as the kitchen, in unsatisfactory condition for others to use etc. Please note that this is not an entire list.

The University retains discretion of passing an opinion on the type of infraction (minor vs. major infraction) taking into consideration a report from dormitory administration, R.A.s, statements from other residents and if necessary damages caused by the resident.

5. In case of major infractions actions described in Item 2 or 3 will be taken, or alternatively the case will be forwarded to the Disciplinary Commission.

55) These regulations must be followed by all students in the English language programs at PUMS, as well as by students of other universities living in the dormitory, including the LLP Erasmus students, or similar.

56) Any cases which are not covered by these regulations are first addressed by the Residential Advisors; and if the issue in question escalates, forwarded to the Vice President of Student Affairs.

57) All cases of breaching these regulations, or of violating the common basic principles of living in the dormitory social setting, will be first addressed by the R.A.s, then the dormitory administration, and further by the Dean’s office for the English language programs; and they will consequently be resolved by an appropriate disciplinary action.

A violation of any dormitory rules and regulations committed while under the influence of alcohol or drugs or other intoxicating substances will be severely punished, and all such cases will be forwarded to the Disciplinary Committee.

58) The R.A.s act as mediators between dormitory residents and the University Administration. The dormitory residents are obligated to cooperate with the R.A.s, respect the dormitory regulations, and follow the R.A.s’ decisions.

59) The members of the R.A. team are obligated to intervene in all cases where the regulations are being violated.

60) The R.A.s along with the members of the dormitory administration are allowed to conduct unannounced, random room spot checks. In extraordinary life or health threatening situations room spot checks can be performed without the presence of an R.A. by two dormitory administration employees, including the manager of PUMS Dormitory Administration. The manager of PUMS Dormitory Administration is required to submit a protocol following each such spot check visit.

Missing Student Notification Policy

61) The University introduces a procedure related to the notification policy with respect to a missing student who is a resident of the student dormitory, according to which:

– A list that has been constructed of people and organizations whom students, employees, and other persons should contact upon the disappearance of a student after 24 hours have elapsed.

– The dormitory security and administrative personnel as well as the police must be immediately informed about a student’s disappearance.

– Each student may identify a contact person whom the Poznan University of Medical Sciences should notify within 24 hours from the time of learning about the student’s disappearance, provided that the student was determined missing by the dormitory security and administrative staff, and by the police.

– Students will be instructed that the contact information will be kept confidential, that it will be made available only to the authorized administrative personnel, and that it cannot be disclosed to anyone except for the law enforcement agencies involved in the search for the missing student.

– Students under 18 years of age will be instructed by the Poznan University of Medical Studies that the University will have to inform, besides the contact person selected by the student, also the student’s parent or legal guardian of the student’s disappearance within 24 hours from the time it was confirmed that he/she is missing.

– Students will be made responsible for keeping the dormitory administration informed of their absences from the dormitory that are longer than 24 hours.

The dormitory administration is the organization responsible for the notification process regarding any missing students who are registered dormitory residents.

Complaints and suggestions

62) In the cases where there is an issue of concern in the dormitory, the resident should alert the following authorities:

a) Residents faced with situations that may be health and life-threatening or otherwise pose a threat to dormitory safety and/or security should immediately notify University authorities onsite (administration, R.A.s, porter, security staff) — and/or the appropriate emergency services (the police, fire brigade, medical emergency service), if appropriate.

b) In the case of some non-threatening and non-violent situations or issues, like: roommate disputes; nuisance disturbances like parties, loud music or other noise-related matters; as well as in dealing with other less critical issues, we suggest that you try to resolve them peacefully at first by yourself. We suggest that you try to refrain from engaging the help of the R.A.s or any other administrative resources at a higher level. next, only if the matter could not be resolved by you, please involve the R.A.s or the dormitory staff as appropriate. We recommend that issues of lesser impact be handled initially by the dormitory resident.

c) If you cannot resolve the situation on your own, activate the R.A. system by contacting an R.A. in your dormitory. The R.A. will then take over the situation and try to address it.

d) The R.A. system will escalate the situation to the appropriate University authorities if necessary.

e) Complaints should be made in writing if possible so that there is a record of the complaint. Anonymous complaints are difficult to follow up on because the information concerning the incident cannot be properly collected from the complainant. Please rest assured that complaints will be treated as strictly confidential.

f) The R.A. system does not handle such matters as room assignments, room or equipment repairs, or dormitory payment issues. You may ask an R.A. for advice on these issues, but they are usually handled by the dormitory administration. In general, the Dean’s office and the dormitory administration are not to be contacted directly by dormitory residents for help with other types of problems except for emergency circumstances.

63) Dormitory residents have the right to make any suggestions or share ideas concerning dormitory operations or the functioning of the R.A. system. Such suggestions should be submitted to any R.A. and/or to any authorized member of the student organizations that are part of the English language programs at the University of Medical Sciences (English Programs’ Student Union—EPSU). Then, the R.A.s and/or the representatives of those student organizations will take proper steps to address residents’ ideas or concerns.

64) Any serious offenses, which include but are not limited to sexual assault, battery, racial discrimination, and financial disputes, will be subject to disciplinary action and in case the offense will meet the legal/statutory criteria of a crime respective enforcement authorities will be notified. Dormitory residents may initially ask an R.A. for assistance in contacting University administration, security personnel, and/or the police, but otherwise these matters lie outside of the scope of the R.A. responsibilities.

65) In the case of issues that cannot be resolved by the above regulations, we follow the Dormitory Regulations for the Poznan University of Medical Sciences.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

We are very grateful to the PUMS students and staff who in concert with the dormitory management authorities have richly contributed to the content of this document. Please keep in mind that this is a document-in-progress and we welcome the ideas, comments, and suggestions from all concerned parties. We hope it will enable us to support our students in their dormitory life, their home away from home for the duration of their studies in Poznan. Please direct your comments to the e-mail address dorm@ump.edu.pl.

 

 

Come meet us in Toronto and Chicago!

If the difficult task of choosing your future alma mater is still ahead of you and you are in need of information to help you with the choice, you are more than welcome to visit the Polish Universities Fair organized by the Fahrenheit Center for Study Abroad. The event will give you an opportunity to meet with PUMS representatives and find out in detail about our educational offer.

The fair will be held in Toronto and Mississauga on Mar 1 to Mar 2, 2013, after which it will move to Chicago for Mar 3 to Mar 4, 2013.

More details available on the following website: http://www.fahrenheitcenter.org/iii-polish-universities-fair.html

AccessMedicine training session

Dear students,

We are pleased to invite you to attend the AccessMedicine training session that will be held on Wednesday (Jan.30th ) and Thursday (Jan.31st), from 4:45 pm – 5:30 pm in Swiecickiego lecture room located in Gynecology and Obstetrics Hospital at 33 Polna Street (AccessMedicine_training_Jan13).

We hope to see you there!
Dean’s office

MD Consult and Clinical Key on-line resources

Dear PUMS students,

This is to remind you that access to MD Consult for the following title has been set up for all PUMS IPs.

Your access has been set up via IP Authentication. Access can now be gained by going to the following URL– http://www.mdconsult.com

Please see our MD Consult Information site at http://info.mdconsult.com

With IP Authenticated access, we also have created the ability for end users within PUMS IP ranges to register online and create a user name and password. This user name and password will allow your end users to take access MD Consult remotely, from their homes, offices or any other location.

To set up a user name after entering MD Consult through IP verification, follow the “Register” link.

Please be informed that you can also access CLINICAL KEY on-line resources on the PUMS Library website at http://www.bg.am.poznan.pl/index.php?lang=eng

Best wishes,
Dean’s office
Center for Medical Education in English