Description of courses for 3-year B.Sc. Physiotherapy Program

  • Clinical Bases and Physiotherapy in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Knowledge of issues in the field of gynaecology: conducting interview, gynaecological examination, basic disease entities in gynaecology.
    2. Physiological changes during pregnancy, the most common co-morbidities of pregnancy.
    3. Knowledge of issues related to obstetrics. Physiological and surgical childbirth. Physiology and pathology of childbirth – basic issues.

    Practicals:

    1. Conducting an interview, examination.
    2. Keeping clinical documentation to the extent necessary in physiotherapeutical practice.
    3. Female genital prolapse and urinary incontinence – diagnosis, treatment.
    4. The proceedings after surgery, contraindications for surgery, postoperative complications – prevention and treatment.

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student distinguishes and explains basic concepts related to the subject.
    2. The student distinguished and uses concepts related to diagnostics and treatment in obstetrics and gynaecology.
    3. The student has and uses elementary knowledge of physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology.
    4. The student suggests diagnostics and points to the symptoms of diseases in obstetrics and gynaecology.
    5. The student appropriately and skilfully argues the preparation of physiotherapy program of for the patient based on the conceptual apparatus.
    6. The student cooperates in an interdisciplinary team and works in collaboration with the doctor, midwife.
      The student understands the importance of discussion in the field of gynaecological and obstetric physiotherapy using proper argumentation.
    7. The student understands the needs reported by the patient and responds appropriately selecting a proper physiotherapy program.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Practical Training (2nd year)

    Practical training during the academic year covers 200 hours, including:

    1. Kinesis therapy – 100 hours,
    2. Physical therapy – 100 hours.

    Summer practical training covers 180 hours, including:

    1. Physical therapy practical training – 100 hours,
    2. Clinical practical training – 80 hours.

     

    Curriculum content:

    1. Introducing students to the organization of a hospital or other healthcare facility in which students undergo the practical training (characteristics of the unit).
    2. Introducing students to the equipment; to performance of physical treatments (type of equipment, maintenance, certifications, etc.).
    3. Reading the documentation in the health care unit (card orders).
    4. Performing the exercises of kinesis therapy independently.
    5. Independent performance of physiotherapy, such as: : heat therapy, cold therapy, hydrotherapy and exercise in water, electrotherapy, magnetic therapy, phototherapy, laser therapy, ultrasounds, thermotherapy.
    6. Extending theoretical knowledge during the meetings with the person supervising the practical training and using the knowledge in practice.
    7. Introducing students to the unit in which they undergo the practical training, that is: the types of treatments performed, what kind of diseases the unit is treating, physiotherapy equipment etc.
    8. Introducing students to the profile of training place and the therapeutic regimen for dealing with the most common diseases in hospital. Assisting during work with patients in the above mentioned diseases.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student can read thedocumentationinthephysiotherapyfacility
    1. The student can perform kinesis therapy treatments and therapeutic massage under the control of the training supervisor.
    2. The student can perform physiotherapy, such as: : heat therapy, cold therapy, hydrotherapy and exercise in water, electrotherapy, magnetic therapy, phototherapy, laser therapy, ultrasounds, thermotherapy.

    The student can work with patients in the most common diseases in hospital.

  • Occupational Therapy in Neurology

    Curriculum content:

    1. Occupational therapy for patients with various neurological diseases: multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke.
    2. Practical training in the field of occupational therapy for adult patients with various neurological diseases: multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke, cerebral palsy.
    3. Orthopaedic aids in everyday usage for patients with neurological.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student knows the scope of occupational therapy for patients with neurological diseases: multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke, cerebral palsy
    2. The student can help to select appropriate orthopaedic aids in order to facilitate the daily functioning of patients with various diseases from a group of neurological disorders.

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Cell Biology and Biotechnology in Locomotor Disorders

    Curriculum content:

    1. Structure of the genome and the flow of genetic information (replication, transcription, translation).
    2. Mutations. Methods of inheritance. Diagnosis mutations.
    3. Gene therapy and therapeutic approaches in selected disease entities.

    Stem cells: characterization, source (cloning, IPS, cord blood).

    1. Recombinant proteins, growth factors, PRP in the treatment of organ motion.

    Transgenic animals as models of diseases of the locomotor system and manufacture of recombinant proteins.

    1. The use of gene and cell therapy for the treatment of diseases of bone and cartilage.
    2. The use of gene and cell therapy for the treatment of diseases of muscle and nerve tissues.

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student can describe the structure of the genome and the flow of genetic information (replication, transcription, translation).
    2. The student can describe mutations. Methods of inheritance. Diagnosis mutations.
    3. The student can describe gene therapy and therapeutic approaches in selected disease entities. Stem cells: characterization, source (cloning, IPS, cord blood).
    4. The student can describe recombinant proteins, growth factors, PRP in the treatment of organ motion.
    5. The student can characterize transgenic animals as models of diseases of the locomotor system and manufacture of recombinant proteins.
    6. The student can characterize the use of gene and cell therapy for the treatment of diseases of bone and cartilage.
    7. The student can characterize the use of gene and cell therapy for the treatment of diseases of muscle and nerve tissues.

    Assessment method: credit, test with a grade

  • Palpative Anatomy

    Curriculum content:

    1. Functional anatomy.
    2. Palpative anatomy of the shoulder girdle.
    3. Palpative anatomy of the upper limb.
    4. Palpative anatomy of the pelvis.
    5. Palpative anatomy of the lower limb.
    6. Palpative anatomy of the spine.

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student can discuss the basic division in functional anatomy.
    2. The student can perform palpation of anatomical structures of the shoulder girdle, upper limb, pelvis, lower limb and spine.

     

    Assessment method: credit

  • Sports Medicine

    Curriculum content:

    1. Key information on the aims and objectives of sports medicine.
    2. Detailed discussion of rules of eligibility of people for practicing sports. Discussing main health contraindications for individual sports
    3. General principles for periodic health examinations for people practicing sports.
    4. Main principles of optimizing nutrition in athletic training.
    5. Control methods used in athletic training. Presentation of measurement tools enabling the control of athletic training.
    6. General rules for the fight against illicit substances supporting the body’s ability to exercise. Doping in sport.
    7. General principles for preventing injuries in sports.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student knows goals and tasks of sports medicine.
    2. The student knows the rules of eligibility of people for practicing sports.
    3. The student knows the methods for controlling athletic training and can independently use the knowledge in practice.
    4. The student knows basic information regarding most common injuries in sports and knows general principles for avoiding them.

    Assessment method: credit

  • Clinical Biomechanics

    Curriculum content:

    1. Biomechanics as the study of the structure of human movement: origins, divisions, interdisciplinarity.
    2. The structural parameters of the human movement. The functional parameters of muscle actons.
    3. General characteristics of test methods used in biomechanics.
    4. Mass/inertial parameters of the human body.
    5. Biomechanics of muscles: basic geometrical, static and dynamic characteristics of skeletal muscles.
    6. Biomechanical characteristic of the body posture.
    7. Biomechanical interpretation of the human motor coordination. Bernstein’s theory of movement behaviour.
    8. Biomechanics of locomotion. Kinematic and dynamic structure of walking.
    9. Measurement of characteristic somatic parameters for calculating: masses and radii of mass centres (based on regression equations) and static loads.
    10. Detailed description of the structural parameters of the upper limb, lower limb, the spine and chest with the calculation of their mobility calculation; characterization of the functional parameters of selected muscle actons.
    11. Determination of the position of the general centre of mass using the direct method: the du Bois-Reymond technique.
    12. Calculating the masses and radii of the centres of masses of human body segments based on specific regression equations.
    13. Calculation of static loads in the characteristic geometric positions of the body and limbs, derived from the maintenance of body segments.
    14. Biomechanics of muscles – characteristics of the force/torque dependency and the operating angle of the muscle.
    15. Biomechanics of muscles – description of the dependency between force and torque of a muscle and its length [F= f (L)]; muscle force and the time needed to generate it [F = f (t)]; muscle force/torque and the speed of its contraction [F = f (V)].
    16. Measurement of muscle forces and torques generated in statics and quasi-statics. Topography of torques of muscle forces and its importance in clinical biomechanics/physiotherapy.
    17. Measurement of torques of muscle forces generated by muscles of the torso.
    18. Body postures through studies of postural stability. Laboratory experiments.
    19. Biomechanics of walking – detailed kinematic characteristics of angular changes in the joints: the hip, knee and upper ankle in the walking cycle.
    20. Biomechanics of walking – detailed characteristics of the dynamic reaction of the ground in the walking cycle. Biomechanical interpretation of the walking with crutches. The context of dynamic loading/unloading. Laboratory experiments.
    21. Biomechanical interpretation of movement techniques. The context of compensatory mechanisms.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student has basic knowledge of biomechanics and clinical biomechanics.
    2. The student has knowledge of basic research methods of biomechanics and their application.
    3. The student can interpret: body posture and the problem of postural stability, kinematic and dynamic structure of physiological and pathological walking, the characteristic limit values of the parameters of human walking.
    4. The student can take basic measurements of postural stability.
    5. The student can take basic measurements of forces and torques of chosen groups of muscles.
    6. The student can take basic measurements of ground reaction forces in walking/running type of movement.

    Assessment method: exam

  • Physical Education in Water Pool

    Curriculum content:

    1. Learning to swim with front crawl.
    2. A list of shaping exercises, strengthening upper and lower limbs and muscles of the spine. A list of the following exercises: buoyancy control, breathing exercises, coordination exercises and relaxation exercises. List of games and activities involving swimming.
    3. Exercises increasing the range of movement in joints. Exercises improving the silhouette and correcting posture. Jumping into the water, the elements of water rescuing. Exercises developing endurance.
    4. Learning the butterfly stroke.
    5. Learning the breaststroke.

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student has knowledge of the list of   exercises that increase the range of movement in joints and act on the spine.
    2. The student knows how tu apply shaping exercises in teaching various swimming techniques.
    3. The student has knowledge on how to master swimming techniques properly.
    4. The student knows how use relaxation exercises in the aquatic environment.
    5. The student knows how to apply standard and custom gear in teaching various styles of swimming and to make classes more attractive
    6. The student can use shaping exercises that increase the range of movements in joints and acting on the spine in the aquatic environment.
    7. The student can select the exercises that help mastering swimming techniques.
    8. Has mastered swimming styles.
    9. The student can carry out relaxation exercises in water.
    10. Makes physical activities in water more attractive by using standard and custom gear.

     

    Assessment method: credit

  • Physical Culture in Rehabilitation

    Curriculum content:

    1. Physical culture as one of the elements of rehabilitation.
    2. Mental training – principles and learning how to carry it out independently.
    3. Strength training, games compensating muscular disparities in people with muscle paralysis and paraplegia.
    4. Nordic Walking, strength training, games used in rehabilitation of upper and lower limbs.
    5. Exercise for the elderly, prevention, maintenance and restoration of correct body posture according to exercises by prof. Artur Dziak

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student has knowledge of physical culture regarding elimination of consequences of diseases caused by body dysfunctions.
    2. The student has knowledge of the fitness of the elderly and the basic resource of exercises to be used with this group of people.
    3. The student has knowledge of adapting physical activity to the needs and possibilities of persons threatened with damage to the musculoskeletal system
    4. The student has knowledge of various forms of movement and exercises for people with various disabilities.
    5. Has the ability to present and perform specialized forms of physical activity in order to eliminate the consequences of disease caused by a dysfunction of the body.
    6. Has the ability to perform exercises delaying the ageing process.
    7. Has the ability to adapt physical activity to the needs and abilities of people threatened with damage to the musculoskeletal system.
    8. Has the ability to carry out efficient and safe physical activities with persons with various impairments of the body.

     

    Assessment method: credit

  • Psychology

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Basics of clinical and developmental psychology as a field of research and practice
    2. Human emotional functioning in the course of individual development and psychopathology
    3. Basic theoretical concepts of stress and coping with stress
    4. Psychosomatic and somatopsychic dependencies in human functioning.
    5. ICD10 and DSMIVTR diagnostic classifications and basic diagnostic criteria of selected disorders and factors influencing their incidence.
    6. The ability to recognize and analyse factors interfering with human development.
    7. Tasks implemented by clinical and development psychology: psychopathology, development, features and phases of development.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. Uses knowledge of the models of clinical and developmental diagnosis in undertaking practical tasks, understands the specifics of clinical diagnosis and can determine the importance of a clinical problem with respect to the patient’s behaviour and the relationship with the patient.
    2. The student knows the basic assumptions of clinical and development psychology referring to the patomechanism of most common types of mental disorders.
    3. The student understand the relationship between emotional state and behaviour.
    4. Uses psychological knowledge reflexively in the perception of disorders, risk factors and resources and mechanisms in clinical and developmental psychology.
    5. The student knows the ICD10 and DSMIVTR diagnostic classifications and basic diagnostic criteria of selected disorders and factors influencing their incidence.
    6. The student knows psychosomatic and somatopsychic dependencies in human functioning.

    Assessment method: exam

  • Pediatric Physiotherapy

    Curriculum content:

    1. Characteristics of the infant psychomotor development.
    2. Characteristics of the psychomotor development in early childhood.
    3. Characteristics of reflexive reactions that occur during the pre and postnatal development of the child.
    4. Characteristics of the scale used to assess the psychomotor development of the child.
    5. Improving children’s skills using neurodevelopmental methods.

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student can characterize the psychomotor development of an infant.
    2. The student can characterize the psychomotor development in early childhood.
    3. The student can characterize reflexive reactions that occur during the pre and postnatal development of the child.
    4. The student can use the scale to assess the psychomotor development of the child.
    5. The student can perform basic treatments in the field of rehabilitation and according to the rules of neurodevelopment.

    Assessment method: credit

  • Manual Therapy

    Curriculum content:

    1. The theoretical basis of manual therapy.

    – the place of manual therapy in the physiotherapeutic process.

    – biomechanical and pathophysiological basis of manual therapy.

    – rules for implementing the basic manual techniques: traction and sliding mobilizations.

    – the basic methods of manual therapy – convergences and differences.

    – indications and contraindications for the use of manual therapy.

    1. An analysis of simple and complex human movements in normal conditions and in conditions of various movement disorders.
    2. Methods of performing basic manual techniques: traction and sliding mobilizations – practical presentation of the manual-articular therapeutic techniques.
    3. Examples of the use of manual therapy techniques in patients with impaired organ system.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has knowledge of theoretical and practical bases of manual therapy.
    2. The student has knowledge of biomechanical analysis of simple and complex anatomic movements

    in normal conditions and in conditions of various movement disorders.

    1. The student knows indications and contraindications for the use of manual therapy.
    2. The student can independently perform manual therapeutic techniques according to the methodology used in manual therapy.
    3. The student can independently perform a biomechanical analysis of the locomotor system. The student can independently select and apply therapeutic techniques, suitable for clinical and functional status of the patient.

     

    Assessment method: exam

  • Practical Training (1st year)

    Practical training during the academic year covers 120 hours, including:

    1. a) preclinical practical training – 80 hours,
    2. b) kinesis therapy practical training – 40 hours.

     

    Summer practical training covers 180 hours, including practical training in:

    1. Kinesis therapy – 120 hours
    2. Physical therapy – 60 hours

     

    Curriculum content:

    1. Introducing students to the work and the organization of the unit.
    2. Introducing students to the tasks and the work of a physiotherapist in the unit.
    3. Reading the documentation in the physiotherapy facility.
    4. Carrying out independently interviews with patients.
    5. Making the basic tests to assess the functional status of patients.
    6. Assisting in the execution of the basic exercises of kinesis therapy.
    7. Independent execution of kinesis therapy treatments and therapeutic massage under the control of the training supervisor.
    8. Assisting in the execution of procedures in the field of: heat therapy, cold therapy, hydrotherapy and exercise in water.
    9. Extending theoretical knowledge during the meetings with the person supervising the practical training and using the knowledge in practice.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student can read thedocumentationinthephysiotherapyfacility
    1. The student can independently interview patient.
    2. The student can perform basic tests to assess the functional status of patients.
    3. The student can perform kinesis therapy treatments and therapeutic massage under the control of the training supervisor.

    The student can perform heat therapy, cold therapy, hydrotherapy and exercise in water

  • Sensomotoric Integration

    Curriculum content:

     

    1 History of sensory integration.

    2 Introduction to the theory of sensory integration.

    3 Construction and operation of the sense organs.

    4 Classification of diagnostic categories sensory processing disorders.

    5 Sensory processing disorders – cases.

    6 Getting the surgery sensory integration.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    The student:

    1 explains the definition of sensory integration.

    2 discusses the structure and functions of the sense organs.

    3 explains the classification of disorders of sensory processes.

    4 can describe the diagnostic tools sensory integration processes

    5 can describe the basic equipping the office sensory integration.

    6 assigns case descriptions to each diagnostic category.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Physical Training

    Curriculum content:

    1. Nationwide test of physical fitness.
    2. Proper movement technique and proper breathing during exercise.
    3. The choice of exercises for overall physical strength training.
    4. The choice of exercises for overall physical endurance training.
    5. The choice of exercises and loads in the prevention of posture defects.
    6. The basics of basketball, volleyball and tennis.
    7. Becoming acquainted with the possibilities of using cardio equipment in the development of motor abilities. Learning how to monitor heart rate.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student can carry out a nationwide test of physical fitness.
    2. The student knows movement technique and is aware of the need for proper breathing during exercise.
    3. The student can plan a physical strength training.
    4. The student can plan a physical endurance training.
    5. The student can plan and carry out exercises for the prevention of posture defects.
    6. The student knows the basics of basketball, volleyball and tennis. The student knows the correct volleyball, basketball and tennis posture; ways to move around the court.
    7. The student knows the possibilities of using cardio equipment in the development of motor abilities. The student can monitor heart rate.

     

    Assessment method: credit

  • Polish Language

    Curriculum content:

    1. Treatment and rehabilitation of the musculoskeletal system.
    2. Treatment and rehabilitation of the cardiovascular system and blood circulation.
    3. Treatment and rehabilitation of the respiratory system.
    4. Treatment and rehabilitation of the nervous system.
    5. The organizational structure of health care and its employees.
    6. The equipment to be found in a physiotherapy office.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of treatment and rehabilitation of the musculoskeletal system.
    2. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of treatment and rehabilitation of the cardiovascular system and blood circulation.
    3. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of treatment and rehabilitation of the respiratory system.
    4. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of treatment and rehabilitation of the nervous system.
    5. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of the organizational structure of health care and its employees.
    6. The student knows the vocabulary in the field of the equipment to be found in a physiotherapy office.

     

    Assessment method: credit

  • Introduction to Physiotherapy

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Explaining the concept of rehabilitation and physiotherapy
    2. Discussion of chemical, physical and mechanical stimuli acting on the body during physical therapy.
    3. The effect of and indications and contraindications for balneology, massage, kinesiotherapy, therapy with heat and cold, magnetotherapy, phototherapy, hydrotherapy, therapy with laser and ultrasound.

     

    Practicals:

    1. Assessing the range of motion of limbs using a goniometer.
    2. Assessment of the range of motion of the spine using a tape measure.
    3. Assessment of the muscle strength.
    4. Basic clinical tests
    5. Rehabilitation exercises and techniques – a clinical case.
    6. Synergy and kinematic chains – a clinical case.
    7. Discussion of dynamic and static muscle activity – a clinical case.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student can explain the concept of rehabilitation and physiotherapy.
    2. The student can discuss the chemical, physical and mechanical stimuli acting on the human body during physical therapy treatment.
    3. The student has knowledge of the effect of and indications and contraindications for balneology, massage, kinesiotherapy, therapy with heat and cold, magnetotherapy, phototherapy, hydrotherapy, therapy with laser and ultrasound.
    4. The student can assess the range of motion of limbs using a goniometer.
    5. The student can assess the range of motion of the spine using a tape measure.
    6. The student can assess muscle strength.
    7. The student knows basic clinical tests
    8. The student knows rehabilitation exercises and techniques.
    9. The student can discuss practical synergies and kinematic chains.
    10. The student can discuss muscle function.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Biochemistry

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. The rules of occupational health and safety in a biochemistry lab.
    2. Structure, properties, and nomenclature of biological compounds: carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins and enzymes, fats, nucleic acids, vitamins and hormones.
    3. Biological significance of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins.
      Organization of genetic information. Mutations and mutagenic agents.
    4. The activity of the enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract.
    5. The characteristics and function of biological membranes and their role in the organization of intracellular metabolic processes, the relationship between the structures of cells and their functions.
    6. The basics of biochemical processes occurring in the human body. Body fluids

     

    Practicals:

    1. The reactions of simple and complex carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins.
    2. The composition of a proper human diet, energy balance.
    3. The location of the metabolic pathways in the cell (main processes of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and nucleotides – hormone regulation). Catabolic and anabolic processes. Biological oxidation Bioenergetics as a system of integrated endoergic and exoergic reactions. The use of energy sources.
    4. Biochemical laboratory diagnostics. The reference values of the compounds found in blood and urine
    5. The water and electrolyte balance, acid-base balance

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student knows the rules of occupational health and safety in a biochemistry lab.
    2. The student knows the structure, properties, and nomenclature of biological compounds: carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins and enzymes, fats, nucleic acids, vitamins and hormones.
    3. The student understands the biological significance of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins. The student knows the reactions of simple and complex carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins.
    4. The student has knowledge of the organization of genetic information, mutations and mutagenic factors.
    5. The student has knowledge of the enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract.
    6. The student knows the characteristics and function of biological membranes and their role in the organization of intracellular metabolic processes, and the relationship between the structures of cells and their functions.
    7. The student has basic knowledge of biochemical processes in the human body.
    8. The student can name the components of a proper human diet, taking into account the energy balance.
    9. The student has knowledge of body fluids. The student knows the reference values of the compounds found in blood and urine.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

     

  • Biophysics

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Biophysics of the circulatory system. Types of flows. The continuity equation for fluids. The influence of hydrostatic pressure on the human body.
    2. A detailed discussion of the characteristics of mechanical waves and mechanism of their formation. Active and passive effect of mechanical waves on the human body. The Doppler effect.
    3. A detailed discussion of the effects of factors such as temperature, humidity, acceleration and ionizing radiation on the human body. Referring a problem to physiotherapeutic issues.

     

    Practicals:

    1. Mechanobiology on the cellular level and mechanical properties of the tissues of the biomechanical system. General overview of the problem in relation to physiotherapy and rehabilitation.
    2. Structure of the tissues of the biomechanical system from the perspective of biomechanics. General presentation of the problem: the man as a bio-machine in the context of biomechanical systems.
    3. General information about the physical and chemical structure and physical properties of biological membranes.
    4. General information concerning the organization of the cell membrane, the fluidity with respect to environmental factors. Membrane transport and building of the membrane capacity. The use of the phenomenon in physiotherapeutic practice.
    5. Exercises/Self-education: Becoming acquainted with the sources of the laser light. Detailed discussion of the operating principle and types of lasers. The biological effect of the laser on tissues. The use of laser light in physical therapy.
    6. Exercises/Self-education: General information on the function and structure of the hearing and sight organs. The principles of transduction of sound signals and image conversion in the relevant organs of the human body. Becoming acquainted with the use of sound waves in imaging and physiotherapy treatments.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student knows the structure and mechanical properties of tissues of the musculoskeletal system;
    2. The student knows the types of forces acting on the biomechanical system and understands how they influence the development of the mechanical strength of tissues.
    3. The student can describe the structure of biological membranes and specify their physicochemical properties, as well as foresee the effect of changing environmental conditions of the cells.
    4. The student knows the principles of the membrane transport and knows how the membrane potential is built.
    5. The student knows the rules for performing functional examinations that are necessary for the choice of means in physiotherapy.
    6. The student can describe the types of sound waves used in imaging and physiotherapy treatments.
    7. The student knows the basic laws describing the blood flow in the blood vessels.
    8. The student knows how hydrostatic pressure affects the human body.
    9. The student knows the physical characteristics of mechanical waves and the mechanism of their formation, as well as their active and passive effect on the human body.
    10. The student knows the biological effects of factors such as temperature, humidity, acceleration and ionizing radiation.
    11. The student knows the design and operation of the laser. The student knows how lasers are used in physical therapy and their biological effect in the tissues.
    12. The student can indicate how the biomechanical strength of the tissue will change due to changes in the content of individual building elements and changes in the structure under the influence of biological and mechanical stimuli.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Ethics and Deontology

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Basic concepts of bioethics as a scientific discipline. Basic bioethical attitudes.
    2. Discussion, becoming acquainted with and identifying an ethical problem that can be encountered in the practice of medicine
    3. Becoming acquainted with sources of morality
    4. Developing an attitude of understanding towards basic ethical concepts (utilitarian, personalistic and deontological justification); and identification of professional ethics.
    5. Developing the skill of adopting an attitude towards an ethical dilemma. Identifying culturally conditioned factors of an ethical dilemma. A detailed discussion of the relevance of an ethical dilemma as the conflict of different roles, different practices and values which govern them.
    6. Discussion of bioethical dilemmas: abortion, euthanasia


    Learning outcomes

    1. Has elementary knowledge of key concepts and attitudes in bioethics
    2. The student can identify ethical problem and attempt to adopt a position towards an ethical dilemma
    3. The student understands the importance of differences in the concepts of morality, ethics and bioethics in practical and cultural context

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • First Aid

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Discussion of the chain of survival
    2. The use of practical knowledge about the chain of survival
    3. Detailed discussion of principles for basic life support, a detailed discussion of guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Referring the guidelines with the division into adults and children
    4. Practical use of knowledge of the guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, performing BLS

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has knowledge of chain of survival. The student can put the knowledge into practice.
    2. The student can use the knowledge of CPR and BLS into practice.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Fundamentals of Computer Science

    Curriculum content:

    1. Software used for data analysis (STATISTICA)
    2. Interpretation of data: quantitative and qualitative data
    3. Descriptive statistics
    4. Confidence intervals
    5. Verification of hypotheses

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student knows the software used for data analysis (STATISTICA)
    2. The student can interpret data: quantitative and qualitative data
    3. The student has knowledge of descriptive statistics
    4. The student can use proper confidence intervals
    5. The student can verify hypotheses

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Gross Anatomy

    Curriculum content:

    Lectures:

    1. Detailed information about the skeletal and muscular system
    2. Detailed information about the nervous system
    3. Sensory organs
    4. Skin
    5. Information about the circulatory system
    6. Information about the lymphatic system
    7. General information about the respiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital and endocrine system

    Practicals:

    1. Bone structure, types of bones and connections. Muscles – macroscopic structure, types of muscles. The topographic division of muscles, insertions, functions and innervation. Fascia.
    2. Functional anatomy (muscular activity in subgroups):
    • names of movements in the joints
    • upper limb
    • lower limb
    • thorax
    • head
    1. The division of the nervous system. Peripheral nervous system: types of nerve fibers, tangles, spinal nerves, cranial nerves. The division of the central nervous system. Detailed structure of the spinal cord and brain. Reticular formation. The limbic system. The autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic system, nerve centers, cerebral ganglia.
    2. The sight organ (the eye).
    3. The vestibulocochlear organ.
    4. Skin receptors.
    5. The circulatory system. The structure of the heart. The topography of the heart. General structure of systemic and pulmonary circulation. The system of blood vessels.
    6. The lymphatic system and spleen, thymus. The system of lymphatic vessels. Lymph nodes.
    7. General structure of the pulmonary tract and lungs. The topography of the lungs. The gastrointestinal system, the division and the overall structure of individual sections of the gastrointestinal system. The urogenital system. The structure of the kidneys and urinary tract. Male and female genitals.

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has detailed knowledge of anatomy and functioning of the human movement apparatus.
    2. The student has detailed knowledge of anatomy and functioning of the human nervous system.
    3. The student is able to demonstrate his/her knowledge of the anatomy of the respiratory, digestive, excretory and endocrine system, as well as sense organs.
    4. The student has detailed knowledge of the anatomy and functioning of the human lymphatic system.
    5. The student is able to demonstrate his/her knowledge of the structure and functioning of the respiratory system.
    6. The student is able to demonstrate his/her knowledge of the structure and functioning of the sense organs and skin.

    Assessment method: Exam and credit from particular exercises. Practical exam from the skeletal and muscular part.

  • Health Promotion and Health Care

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Definition and scope of preventive health care, health promotion and health education, phases of preventive health care
    2. The main determinants of health
    3. The concept of salutogenesis by Aaron Antonovsky
    4. Key assumptions of the National Health Programme
    5. Healthy School, Healthy Hospital and Healthy City programs as examples of of habitat programs
    6. Examples of health promoting activities for different aspects of obesity

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student understands the definition and scope of preventive health care, health promotion and health education.
    2. The student can list the main determinants of health.
    3. The student knows the key assumptions of National Health Programme
    4. The student can describe the following programs: Healthy School, Healthy Hospital and Healthy City programs as examples of of habitat programs
    5. The student knows the concept of salutogenesis
    6. The student can name examples of health promoting activities in, among others, different aspects of obesity.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Intensive Care

    Curriculum content:

    1. General presentation of selected life-threatening conditions associated with the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system and polytrauma.
    2. Practical use of knowledge of the selected life-threatening conditions associated with the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system and polytrauma.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has knowledge of selected life-threatening conditions associated with the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system and polytrauma.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Fundamentals of Medical Physiotherapy

    Curriculum content:

    1. General information on therapeutic exercises in diseases of the musculoskeletal system.
    2. Detailed rules for conducting individual and group gymnastics. Main differences and indications for use.
    3. Discussion of main indications and contraindications for therapeutic exercises of the musculoskeletal system.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student knows rules for conducting individual and group gymnastics
    2. The student knows basic main indications and contraindications for individual and group gymnastics.
    3. The student can independently conduct individual gymnastics in the indicated disease entities
    4. The student can make an appropriate selection of exercises and apply appropriate rate for the exercises, taking into account their duration.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Kinesiology

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Detailed information on human psychomotoricity, its terminology and classification. The concept of psychomotoricity in ontogenesis. Physiologic and psychomotoric conditions of psychomotoricity.
    2. Detailed information on the assessment of the correct human posture and motor skills.

    Practicals:

    1. Work on human movement. Detailed information about the indications and contraindications for the use of movement in humans.
    2. Detailed information about the muscle functions and the nervous system in motion. Reference to the physiological state and pathology of motion.
    3. Detailed discussion of human motoricity in terms of speed, endurance, strength.
    4. Detailed information concerning the analysis of simple and complex human movements. The analysis of locomotor movements and of movement in the joints.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has knowledge of human locomotor activity and in the field of kinesiology.
    2. The student has knowledge of anthropometry. The student has knowledge of body posture and its control.
    3. The student has knowledge of functional analysis of simple and complex human movements.
    4. The student has knowledge of movement analysis in the joints and human locomotor movements.
    5. The student has knowledge of different ways of movement therapy.
    6. The student can use the knowledge of the human locomotor activity while working with patients.
    7. The student can independently make anthropometric measurements. The student can assess body posture.
    8. The student can perform an analysis of simple and complex human movements.
    9. Uses the correct description of human locomotor movements. By applying various forms of activity, can develop the patient’s motor skills.

     

    Assessment method: exam

  • Latin

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. The general Latin terminology of musculoskeletal diseases and their symptoms
    2. The Latin nomenclature of connective tissue diseases and their symptoms
    3. The Latin nomenclature of orthopaedic dysfunctions and their symptoms
    4. The Latin nomenclature of neurological diseases of children and adults

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student uses the Latin nomenclature associated with movement disorders
    2. The student uses the Latin vocabulary associated with connective tissue diseases
    3. The student uses the Latin vocabulary associated with orthopaedic dysfunctions.
    4. The student uses the Latin vocabulary associated with neurological diseases.

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Medical Biology

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Structure and function of eukaryotic cells. Cell signaling, function and types of cellular receptors. The divisions and types of cell death. The characteristics and types of stem cells.
    2. The structure and function of the connective tissue
    3. The structure and function of the epithelial tissue

     

    Practicals:

    1. Detailed information:       The structure and function of nerve cells and glial cells, the organization of the central and peripheral nervous system, primary neurodegenerative processes and mechanisms of axonal regeneration
    2. Detailed information: types of muscle cells, the construction of skeletal muscle cells, sarcomeres, the regeneration process of the muscle cells, the mechanism of skeletal and smooth muscle contraction
    3. The structure of the bone tissue cells and the process of their differentiation, the structure of the compact and cancellous bone tissue and the process of its reconstruction, the structure of periosteum and endosteum
    4. General information: The histological structure and function of epithelial cells and muscle layer of the respiratory organs and their secretory functions
    5. General information: the histological structure and functions: salivary glands, oesophagus, stomach and intestines, and pancreas and liver
    6. General information: the operating principles of optical and fluorescence microscopes

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has knowledge of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells.
    2. The student has detailed knowledge of the structure and function of the connective tissue
    3. The student is able to demonstrate knowledge on the structure and function of the epithelial tissue
    4. The student has detailed knowledge of the structure and function of nerve and muscle cells
    5. The student has general knowledge of the histological structure and function of the tissues of the respiratory and digestive system
    6. The student has knowledge on the operating principles of optical and fluorescence microscopes

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Pedagogy

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Special pedagogy and its sub-disciplines, basic terminology, the relationship between physiotherapy and special pedagogy
    2. Characterizing patients based on different criteria (blind and partially sighted, deaf, mentally disabled, chronically ill, patients with reduced mobility, children with learning difficulties, socially maladjusted persons)
    3. The problem of cooperation with the family or legal guardian of the patient, conditions of the effectiveness of interactions between the physiotherapist and the patient and family.
    4. Principles and methods of work with patients requiring special education, revalidation, re-education, rehabilitation possibilities

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student can define special pedagogy and list its sub-disciplines
    2. The student understands the problem of cooperation with the family or legal guardian of the patient, conditions of the effectiveness of interactions between the physiotherapist and the patient and family.
    3. The student knows the principles and methods of work with patients requiring special education, revalidation, re-education, rehabilitation possibilities
    4. The student can characterize patients based on different criteria (blind and partially sighted, deaf, mentally disabled, chronically ill, patients with reduced mobility, children with learning difficulties, socially maladjusted persons)

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Philosophy

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. The specificity of philosophy as a research discipline
    2. Branches of philosophy, the basic question of philosophy, classical research problems and attitude towards them
    3. The origins of Greek philosophy – the formation of the basic philosophical questions in the Ionian, Pythagorean and Elean school of philosophy Plato, Democritus and Aristotle as examples of paradigmatic attitudes towards credibility of cognition and understanding of being
    4. Augustine and Thomas Aquinas, two attitudes towards the possibility of knowing God
    5. Hobbes and Descartes as representatives of attitudes towards the question about the essence of man
    6. Hobbes and Descartes as representatives of attitudes towards the question about the essence of man
    7. Comte, Bergson and Husserl as the representatives of various attitudes towards the role of science
    8. Maritain, Guardini, Wojtyla – personalism

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has knowledge of philosophy as a research discipline
    2. The student knows branches of philosophy, the basic question of philosophy, classical research problems and attitude towards them
    3. The student has basic knowledge of the beginnings of philosophy in Greece
    4. The student can present the attitudes of Augustine and Thomas Aquinas
    5. The student knows the figures of Descartes and Hobbes
    6. The student can describe different attitude towards the role of science
    7. The student has knowledge of personalism in philosophy

     

    Assessment method: exam

  • Physiology

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. The essence of vital functions
    2. Higher nervous functions
    3. Physiology of the autonomic system
    4. Physiology of the skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscle
    5. Perception
    6. Physiology of the cardiovascular system and blood
    7. Reproductive physiology
    8. Physiology of the respiratory system

    Practicals:

    1. Basics of the exercise physiology
    2. Neurohormonal regulation of life processes, electrophysiological processes
    3. Thyroid hormones. Mineralocorticoids. RAAS. Glucocorticosteroids. Adrenal androgens. Catecholamines. Physiology of the parathyroid glands. Hormones of the calcium-phosphate balance.
    4. Thermal regulation
    5. Neurophysiological basis of human behavior. Motivational centers in the hypothalamus.
    6. The structure and role of the limbic system.
    7. Short-term and permanent memory. Conditioned reflexes, learning.
    8. The activity of the brain, physiology of sleep and wakefulness
    9. The organization of autonomic system – the sympathetic parasympathetic and intestinal part, visceral-sensory neurons.
    10. The receptors of the autonomic nervous system – the division due to: the type of transmitter, the second messenger system, the effects induced in the cell. Regulation of the number of receptors. Denervation hypersensitivity The antagonism between the sympathetic and parasympathetic system.
    11. The reflexes the autonomic nervous system. The study of neurological reflexes.
    12. Muscle tension. Maintenance and regulation of muscle tension.
    13. Motor unit.
    14. The division of skeletal muscles. Types of skeletal muscle contractions.
    15. Energy sources of the working muscles.
    16. Smooth muscles – classification, the mechanism of contraction. Plasticity of the smooth muscles.
    17. Dynamometry
    18. The sense of hearing. Hearing tests – objective and subjective methods.
    19. The sight organ (the eye) The optical properties of the eye. Refractive errors. The retina. Creating an image on the retina. Color blindness. The examination of the eye: visual acuity and color vision testing.
    20. The sense of balance. The receptors of the organ of balance. Nystagmus. The methods of balance testing.
    21. The sense of taste. Taste receptors Flavour types. The sense of smell. Olfactory receptors. Stimulation of the olfactory receptors.
    22. Division of the cardiovascular system – anatomical and functional division. Peripheral circulation.
    23. The importance of the elastic arteries in maintaining blood flow. The importance of the muscular arteries in blood distribution.
    24. Regulation of blood flow – local and humoral.
    25. Physiology of the blood. Blood cell counts. Interpretation of the basic parameters of peripheral blood counts
    26. Endocrine activity associated with reproduction. The function of the hypothalamic-pituitary system in the regulation of reproduction.
    27. Reproductive physiology and function of the ovary; ovulation and the ovulation mechanism, function of the corpus luteum. Hormonal function of the ovary: sex steroids, ovarian peptides.
    28. Biological and systemic effect of the androgens. Changes in male hormone levels.
    29. Embryogenesis
    30. The functions of the respiratory system.
    31. Respiratory muscles. Breathing resistance. Ventilation. Lung compliance. The role of the surfactant. Gas exchange in the lungs. Regulation of breathing.

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has knowledge of neurohormonal regulation of life processes and electrophysiological processes, as well as of thermal regulation.
    2. The student has knowledge of functioning of the higher functions of the central nervous system
    3. The student has knowledge of the limbic system
    4. The student has knowledge of learning process and the memory
    5. The student has knowledge of the division and functioning of the autonomic system, the organization of the system b) The student has knowledge about the receptors of the autonomic nervous system – the division due to: the type of transmitter, second messenger system, the effects induced in the cell. Regulation of the number of receptors. Denervation hypersensitivity
    6. The student has knowledge of autonomic reflexes of the nervous system. The study of neurological reflexes.
    7. The student has knowledge of the physiology of the skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscles
    8. The student has knowledge of perception, as well as the methods of examining the sense organs
    9. The student has knowledge of the cardiovascular system and the physiology of blood
    10. The student has knowledge of embryogenesis and reproductive physiology
    11. The student has knowledge of the respiratory system
    12. The student has knowledge of the brain activity, sleep and wakefulness

    Assessment method: exam

  • Sociology

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Man as a social being: socialization and personalities. Sociology of social groups. Sociology of the family
    2. The cultural basis of social life: the essence and importance of culture for the perception of health, illness, disability, old age and death;
    3. The social model of health
    4. Sociology of deviation: social determinants of deviation; social control; disability as social deviation; social labelling of the sick; the power of stigma
    5. Sociology of institutions: the models of hospital care; the impact of social factors on the healing process; stress in the conditions of a hospital ward; staff-patient communication; problems in patient-staff interactions and ways to improve them

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student can characterize the man as a social being
    2. The student has knowledge of cultural bases of social life
    3. The student can describe the social model of health
    4. The student can describe disability as social deviation; social labelling of the sick
    5. The student can describe the hospital as an institution, the impact of social factors on the healing process; stress in the conditions of a hospital ward; staff-patient communication; problems in patient-staff interactions and ways to improve them

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Therapeutic Massage

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Discussion of the rules of conduct in therapeutic massage.
    2. The problem in reference to selected disease entities.
    3. Indications and contraindications for massage in particular diseases.
    4. Methodology of massaging.

    Practicals:

    1. Detailed discussion of the principles of preparing a patient for a massage.
    2. Discussing the adjustment strength, pace, time, and rhythm to the treatment performed in all positions used in a given disease entity.
    3. Detailed discussion and practical improvement of all therapeutic massage techniques used in disease entities.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has basic knowledge of massage in diseases.
    2. The student knows indications and contraindications for a massage in a given disease.
    3. The student knows the methodology of therapeutic massaging.
    4. The student can independently perform massage techniques used in indicated diseases.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Functional Development of Human

    Curriculum content:

    Seminars:

    1. Psychomotor development of the child. Stages of development. Time of acquiring motor skills.

     

    Practicals:

    1. Functional assessment of a healthy child. The objectives of its application. Assessment methods of psychomotor development of a child.
    2. Functional assessment of a child with disabilities. The objectives of its application. Methods for assessing developmental changes, forecasting movement abilities.
    3. Functional assessment of gross and fine motor skills.

     

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student can describe the psychomotor development of a child and the stages of development.
    2. The student can carry out a functional assessment of a healthy child. The student knows the assessment methods of psychomotor development of a child.
    3. The student can carry out an assessment of a child with disabilities.
    4. The student can assess gross and fine motor skills of a child.
    5. The student can assess gross and fine motor skills of an adult.

     

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • History of Medicine and Physiotherapy

    Upon completing this course students will be ready to place the current medical issues in a wider historical perspective. Specifically, they should be able to:

    • discuss the problems of cultural and historical relativity of health and disease
    • understand the origins of contemporary biomedical knowledge
    • give an overview of the history of physiotherapy and of the various areas of medical specialty
    • place the past and present medical practices in the social, political, economic, technological, and ethical contexts
  • Medical Electrodiagnostics in Physiotherapy

    Curriculum content:

    1. Discussing indications to perform examinations in the field of medical electrodiagnostics.
    2. Discussing electromyographic examination and its applications.
    3. Discussing electroencephalographic examination and its applications.
    4. Discussing electroneurographic examination and its applications.
    5. Presenting and discussing results of examinations in the field of medical electrodiagnostics.
    6. Discussing indications for imaging tests.
    7. Discussing MRI examination and its applications.
    8. Discussing computed tomography and its applications.
    9. Discussing ultrasound examination and its applications.
    10. Presentation and discussing the results of imaging tests.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student knows indications for imaging tests.
    2. The student can name the applications of an MRI examination.
    3. The student can name the applications of a computed tomography examination.
    4. The student can name the applications of an ultrasound examination.
    5. The student knows indications for imaging tests.
    6. The student can name the applications of an electromyographic examination.
    7. The student can name the applications of an electroencephalographic examination.
    8. The student can name the applications of an electroneurographic examination.

     

    Assessment method: credit

  • Corrective Physical Exercises

    Curriculum content:

    1. Posture in ontogenesis
    2. Faulty posture
    3. Body posture in children in different disease entities
    4. Methods of faulty posture therapy
    5. Presentation of therapy according to the different concepts of physiotherapy faulty posture

    Learning outcomes:

    1 The student can discuss posture in ontogenesis

    2 The student can discuss what are the possible deviations from the correct body posture.

    3 The student knows the specifics of body posture in children in different disease entities

    4 The student knows the ways and methods of therapy faulty posture

    5 The student can present methods of therapy according to the different concepts of physiotherapy faulty posture

    Assessment method: credit

  • Rescue and Disaster Medicine

    Curriculum content:

    1. Legal and organizational aspects of the functioning of the emergency medical services.
    2. Disaster Medicine – definitions, divisions, organization of medical support, interoperability of units, triage.
    3. The problems of psychotraumatology and psychological first aid.
    4. First Aid – first aid rules, equipment, cooperation with emergency services.

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student knows the operating principles of emergency services.
    2. The student knows the problems related to disasters and disaster medicine.
    3. The student knows the rules for first aid, especially during mass incidents.
    4. The students knows the rules of providing psychological first aid.
    5. The student can provide first aid.
    6. The student can cooperate with emergency services.
    7. The student can recognize psychological threats and react to them.

     

    Assessment method: credit

  • Methodology of Motor Training

    Curriculum content:

    1. Methodology of motor teaching as a field of science.
    2. Indications, planning, organizing and conducting exercises in rehabilitation in the station system.
    3. Methodology of motor teaching.
    4. Skills and tools of a motor teacher.
    5. The Halliwick Concept.
    6. Modern forms of movement exercises.
    7. Movement exercises in various types of disability.
    8. Forms and rules of motor teaching.
    9. Planning and preparation of physical activities.
    10. The development of a motor habit.
    11. The process of teaching motor functions.
    12. Suggesting the outline as the basic tool in future work.
    13. The division of gymnastic exercises.
    14. Shaping exercises. Exercises of upper limbs.
    15. Forms of running classes.
    16. Exercises of the torso in all planes.
    17. Utilitarian sports exercises: utilitarian, focused on agility and acrobatic.
    18. Means of shaping motor skills: strength, speed, endurance.
    19. Means of shaping motor skills: agility, dexterity, balance, motor coordination and jumping ability. Flexibility as human morphofunctional characteristic.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student can list therapeutic exercises, knows the rules for improvement procedures in persons with diseases and malfunctions, according to their clinical and functional condition.
    2. Describes and interprets theoretical bases for techniques and methodologies for therapeutic improvement.
    3. The student can list the developmental aspects of human movement in different aspects of learning and teaching the movements, using various forms for activity in teaching the movements and controlling the process by mastering the movements.
    4. The student can describe and explain the methodology of movement teaching.
    5. The student can plan physical activities in movement teaching and planning and controlling the process of mastering movement skills.
    6. The student can give advice on lifestyle and procedures in states of irreversible malfunctions or chronic diseases in patients.
    7. The student can plan and carry out an individual rehabilitation plan for a patient.
    8. The student has knowledge of the teaching process of motor actions.
    9. The student has knowledge of the phases of development of a motor habit, types and divisions of shaping exercises and the methods of recording them.
    10. The student knowledge of the forms of running movement classes.
    11. The student has knowledge of utilitarian exercises and their application in the rehabilitation process.
    12. The student has knowledge of the motor skills: strength, speed, endurance.
    13. The student has knowledge of the motor skills: agility, dexterity, balance, motor coordination and jumping ability. The student has knowledge of flexibility as human morphofunctional characteristic.
    14. The student has knowledge of the supplementary exercised used.
    15. The student can independently write an outline of motor classes as the basic form of preparation of a physiotherapist for working with a patient.
    16. The student can properly choose exercises and methods of work with a patient to develop a motor habit. The student can choose starting positions for exercises depending on the objectives. The student can use correct terminology related to the types of movement and shoulder exercises.
    17. The student can choose starting positions for exercises depending on the objectives. The student has learned correct terminology related to the types of movement of lower limbs and the torso in various planes.

    Assessment method: exam

  • Physical Therapy (Hydrotherapy, Electrotherapy, Magneto-, Light, Laser Therapy)

    Curriculum content:

    Hydrotherapy:

    1. The theoretical basis of hydrotherapy. The influence of the aquatic environment the human body.

    – mechanical and physiological factors acting on the body in an aqueous medium,

    – the principles of therapeutic exercise in water and hydrotherapy treatments,

    – the division of hydrotherapy treatments.

    1. Indications and contraindications for the use of therapy in water and hydrotherapy treatments.

     

    1. Methods of performing basic therapeutic exercises in the aquatic environment and hydrotherapy treatments.

     

    1. Examples of using exercise in the aquatic environment and hydrotherapy treatments in patients with disorders of the organ system.

    Electrotherapy:

    1. Basic concepts of electrotherapy and stimuli acting the human body during physical treatments.
    2. Treatments using DC and low-frequency currents.
    3. Treatments using medium and high-frequency currents.
    4. Methods of performing galvanization and iontophoresis.
    5. Methods of performing electrostimulation.
    6. Methods of performing treatments using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation
    7. Methods of performing treatments using diadynamic currents.
    8. Methods of performing treatments using interference currents.
    9. Methods of performing shortwave diathermy and Terapuls.

    Thermo-, laser- and magnetotherapy

    1. Physical and physiological bases of magnetotherapy. The use of magnetotherapy in selected disease entities.
    2. Physical and physiological bases of ultrasound and phototherapy. The use of ultrasound and phototherapy in selected disease entities.
    3. Physical and physiological bases of lasertherapy. The use of lasertherapy in selected disease entities.
    4. Devices used in magnetotherapy and principles of operation. Indications and contraindications for treatments. Methods of performing treatments in the field of magnetotherapy.
    5. Devices used in ultrasound treatment and principles of operation. Indications and contraindications for treatments. Methods of performing treatments in the field of ultrasound therapy.
    6. Devices used in phototherapy and principles of operation. Indications and contraindications for treatments. Methods of performing treatments in the field of phototherapy.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    Hydrotherapy:

    1. The student has knowledge of the functioning of the human body in the aquatic environment.
    2. The student knows the rules of rehabilitation with the use of hydrotherapy treatments.
    3. The student knows indications and contraindications for hydrotherapy treatments.
    4. The student can plan and carry out an individual rehabilitation plan for a patient with the use of the aquatic environment.
    5. The student can independently perform treatments in the field of hydrotherapy.
    6. The student can perform hydrotherapy treatments taking into account patients with different diseases.

     

    Electrotherapy:

    1. The student has basic knowledge of electrotherapy.
    2. The student knows the stimuli acting on the human body during physiotherapy treatment.
    3. The student has basic knowledge of the influence of physiotherapy treatment on the human body.
    4. Has practical knowledge of performing electrotherapy treatment.
    5. The student knows indications and contraindications for electrotherapy treatments.
    6. The student can perform treatments using DC.
    7. The student can perform treatments using low frequency currents.
    8. The student can perform treatments using medium frequency currents.
    9. The student can perform treatments using high frequency currents.

     

    Thermo-, laser- and magnetotherapy:

    1. The student has knowledge of physical and physiological bases of magnetotherapy and its use in chosen diseases.
    2. The student has knowledge of physical and physiological bases of ultrasound therapy and its use in chosen diseases.
    3. The student has knowledge of physical and physiological bases of phototherapy and its use in chosen diseases.
    4. The student has knowledge of physical and physiological bases of lasertherapy and its use in chosen diseases.
    5. The student knows indications and contraindications for physiotherapy treatments.
    6. The student can independently operate the apparatuses used in magnetotherapy, ultrasound therapy and phototherapy.
    7. The student can independently operate the apparatuses used in lasertherapy.
    8. The student can independently perform magnetotherapy, ultrasound therapy and phototherapy treatment in different diseases.
    9. The student can independently perform lasertherapy treatment in different diseases.

     

    Assessment method: exam

  • Music Therapy

    Curriculum content:

    1. Music as a method of controlling the physiological life processes
    2. The history of music therapy.
    3. Music therapy for children visually impaired and sighted
    4. Music therapy for patients with motor impairment
    5. Music therapy – the element of therapy for children with autism
    6. Music therapy for patients with eating disorders
    7. Music therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student can describe the influence of music in controlling the physiological life parameters and processes
    2. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for children visually impaired and sighted
    3. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for patients who present motor impairment.
    4. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for children with autism.
    5. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for patients with eating disorders
    6. The student can plan and lead the basic music therapy session for patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Kinesiotherapy in Rheumatology

    Curriculum content:

    1. Discussing disease entities in the field of rheumatology that kinesiotherapy can be applied to.
    2. Discussing the principles of rehabilitation in different disease entities in the field of rheumatology.
    3. Discussing the walking pattern in different disease entities in the field of rheumatology.
    4. The use and function of orthopaedic equipment in rheumatic diseases.

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student knows disease entities in the field of rheumatology that kinesiotherapy can be applied to.
    2. The student knows the principles of rehabilitation in different disease entities in the field of rheumatology.
    3. The student can discuss the walking pattern in different disease entities in the field of rheumatology.
    4. The student knows the use and function of orthopaedic equipment in rheumatic diseases.

    Assessment method: credit

  • Kinesiotherapy

    Curriculum content:

    1. Repetition of information from anatomy, neurology and physiology in the context of kinesiotherapy.
    2. Discussing disease entities that kinesiotherapy can be applied to.
    3. Basic clinical trials – the purpose and manner of execution.
    4. Discussing the principles of rehabilitation in different disease entities.
    5. Discussing the walking pattern and the development of the walking pattern in different diseases.
    6. The rules for walking after endoprosthetics of the hip and knee joint.
    7. Discussing the principles and methods of kinesiotherapy.
    8. Causes and prevention of spasticity.
    9. The use and functioning of orthopaedic equipment.

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student has knowledge of anatomy, neurology and physiology.
    2. The student knows disease entities that kinesiotherapy can be applied to.
    3. The student knows and can carry out basic clinical tests.
    4. The student knows the principles of rehabilitation in different disease entities.
    5. The student can discuss the walking pattern and the development of the walking pattern in different diseases.
    6. The student knows the rules for walking after endoprosthetics of the hip and knee joint.
    7. The student knows the rules and methods, as well as concepts of kinesiotherapy.
    8. The student knows the causes of and how to prevent spasticity.
    9. The student knows the use and functioning of orthopaedic equipment.

     

    Assessment method: exam

  • Fundamentals of Scientific Information

    Curriculum content:

    1. Knowledge of medical sources of scientific information.
    2. Issues related to the recognition and defining own need for information.
    3. Mechanisms for building information retrieval strategies with special emphasis on targeted search.
    4. Bibliographical references – description and bibliographical records.
    5. Basic issues of copyright.
    6. Methods of searching for information in the literature, bibliographic and full text databases and other sources of medical information.
    7. Access to scientific journals in the field of public health and health-related sciences (printed and electronic).
    8. Principles of preparation of bibliographical record according to the Vancouver system.
    9. Methods for assessing the reliability of sources of information, critical analysis and selection of information, especially from electronic sources.

    Learning outcomes

    1. The student has knowledge of medical sources of scientific information.
    2. The student can recognize and define own needs for information.
    3. The student knows mechanisms for building information retrieval strategies with special emphasis on targeted search.
    4. The student knows types of scientific publications.
    5. The student knows the styles of preparing bibliographical records.
    6. The student knows the basics of copyright.

    Assessment method: credit with a grade

  • Pathophysiology

    Curriculum content:

    1. Overall assessment (on the body level) of causes of a disease.
    2. Detailed assessment (on the organ level) of causes of a disease.
    3. Assessment of the formation mechanisms of diseases, systemic reactions to pathological phenomena – fever, pain reactions.
    4. Assessment of compensatory and repair mechanisms, the phenomenon of regeneration.
    5. Overall assessment of the pathomechanism of a disease, discussing subjects related to pathophysiology of organs.
    6. Assessment of distinction between physiological, compensation and pathological mechanisms.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The students has knowledge of detailed assessment (on the organ level) of causes of a disease.
    2. The student has knowledge of the formation mechanisms of diseases.
    3. The student has knowledge of compensatory and repair mechanisms.
    4. The student knowledge of the pathomechanism of a disease.
    5. The student has knowledge of distinction between physiological, compensation and pathological mechanisms.
    6. The student can describe the development of diseases at the body level.
    7. The student can describe the causes of the development of diseases at the organ level.
    8. The student can describe the pathomechanism of a disease.
    9. The student can distinguish between physiological, compensatory and pathological mechanisms.

     

    Assessment method: credit

  • Neurophysiology

    Curriculum content:

    1. Anatomy of the central nervous system.
    2. Anatomy of the peripheral nervous system.
    3. Physiology of nerve cell.
    4. The development of the nervous system.
    5. Basics neurological examination.
    6. Additional examinations in neurology.
    7. Neuroimaging.
    8. Studies of the bioelectrical activity of the brain.
    9. Basic neurological syndromes.

     

    Learning outcomes:

    1. The student has knowledge of the basics of anatomical and physiological functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system.
    2. The student has knowledge of the theoretical foundations and basic terminology used in additional examinations in neurology.
    3. The student has knowledge of the anatomic and physiologic bases of the neurological examination.
    4. Suggests the use of additional examinations of patients in selected disease entities.
    5. Draws conclusions based on the data obtained from a neurological examination and additional examinations of patients in selected disease entities.
    6. The student can independently carry out a preliminary assessment of the neurological status of patients in selected disease entities
    7. The student can communicate effectively with the patient, the patient’s family and social group.
    8. Manifests readiness to cooperate in an interdisciplinary teams in accordance with the laws and rules of professional ethics.
    9. The student can formulate opinions on various aspects of physiotherapy.

    Assessment method: credit